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Submission + - Graphene Nanocomposite a Bridge to Better Batterie ( 1

derGoldstein writes: ScienceDaily has an article of yet another practical use for graphene: "Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created a graphene and tin nanoscale composite material for high-capacity energy storage in renewable lithium ion batteries. By encapsulating tin between sheets of graphene, the researchers constructed a new, lightweight "sandwich" structure that should bolster battery performance."

Submission + - Wave-harvesting Ships, instead of long cables (

derGoldstein writes: From Discovery: "Harnessing wave energy may be a packed genre, but the non-musical super group composed of researchers from Boston University and the Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation think you might dig their sound ideas on producing cleaner and cheaper wave energy. They want to harness energy from waves using a fleet of ships. The fleet would replace expensive transmission cables currently used to transfer electricity from offshore power generators to the mainland could ultimately be done away with. Typically, these cables fetch a salty price — often more than $500,000 for about .62 miles." You can download a (rather primitive) visualization of the idea here. In terms of cost: "The project could potentially produce electricity at $0.15 per kilowatt hour — far cheaper than the cost of current wave technology, which falls anywhere from $0.30 to $0.65 per kilowatt hour."

Submission + - Cutting your energy bill by a third (

derGoldstein writes: There's an article up on LifeHacker on how to cut your energy bill by a third using "Tech and Common Sense". The article offers some interesting technical solutions on how to find out what's drawing the most power, and when.

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