Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Submission + - Has modern Linux lost its way? (complete.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Debian developer says that Linux is no longer "clean, logical, well put-together, and organized" after systemd.

Submission + - Alibaba Bets $590 Million on Becoming Smartphone Player

An anonymous reader writes: China's Alibaba Group Holding Ltd is taking a $590 million stake in an obscure domestic smartphone maker as the e-commerce giant tests ways to expand its mobile operating system in a shrinking, cut-throat handset market. Extending a previously muted push into hardware, Alibaba said on Monday it will buy an unspecified minority stake in smartphone maker Meizu Technology Co. Dwarfed by rivals like Xiaomi Inc, privately owned Meizu's slice of China's smartphone market is estimated by analysts at below 2 percent. The deal, unlike U.S. rival Amazon.com Inc's foray into smartphones with its own-brand Fire Phone, is designed to help Alibaba push its mobile operating system within China through Meizu's handsets. In return, Zhuhai, Guangdong-based Meizu will get access to Alibaba's e-commerce sales channels and other resources, the companies said in a joint statement.

Submission + - What does a person use for a three button mouse these days? 2

guises writes: Ever since mouse wheels were introduced the middle mouse button has been sidelined to an inadequate click-wheel function, or in some cases ditched altogether. This has never sat well with me, a proper middle button is invaluable for pasting, games, and navigation. More than that, my hand categorically rejects two button mice — the dangling ring finger causes me genuine physical discomfort. I have begged Logitech on multiple occasions to make just one, among their many screwy specialty mice, to replace the Mouseman which I loved so dearly. I thought for a moment that I had been answered with the g600, only to find that they had put the right mouse button in the middle.

So my question to Slashdot is: where does a person turn for a three button mouse these days? I've only found two, both ergonomic and priced accordingly. I use the Contour and like the shape and wheel position, but would love to find something wireless and with a higher DPI sensor.

Submission + - Software deployed to fight 'Felony Lane' theft gang (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A gang of thieves operating across at least 34 US states is being targeted by law enforcement agencies using criminal analytics software. Key "Felony Lane Gang" leaders have been difficult to prosecute because they are highly mobile and use intermediaries to cash stolen checks.

Analytics software is being used to build profiles of these gang members and deliver actionable insights into their activities.

Submission + - Judge cites use of secure email Riseup as a potential terrorist indicator (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Is it possible that using secure email services can be construed as an indicator of being a terrorist? Although it's a ridiculous notion that using secure email implies criminal activities, a judge cited that reason to partially justify arrests in Spain.

In December, as part of "an anti-terrorist initiative" Operation Pandora, over 400 cops raided 14 houses and social centers in Spain. They seized computers, books, and leaflets and arrested 11 people. Four were released under surveillance, but seven were "accused of undefined terrorism" and held in a Madrid prison. This led to "tens of thousands" participating in protests. As terrorism is alleged "without specifying concrete criminal acts," the attorney for those seven "anarchists" denounced the lack of transparency.

Submission + - The next big step for Wikidata: forming a hub for researchers (wikipedia.org)

The ed17 writes: Wikidata, Wikimedia's free linked database that supplies Wikipedia and its sister projects, is gearing up to submit a grant application to the EU that would expand Wikidata's scope by developing it as a science hub. ... This proposal is significant because no other open collaborative project ... can connect the free databases in the world across disciplinary and linguistic boundaries. ...the project will be capable of providing a unique open service: for the first time, that will allow both citizens and professional scientists from any research or language community to integrate their databases into an open global structure, to publicly annotate, verify, criticise and improve the quality of available data, to define its limits, to contribute to the evolution of its ontology, and to make all this available to everyone, without any restrictions on use and reuse.

Submission + - Linux distro for hybrid laptop (convertible)

Steve Parrish writes: I needed a new laptop and found a great deal on an Asus Transformer TP500L from Microsoft. It is a flip type that can be used as a tablet. I knew I would likely replace Windows 8.1 and may have a difficult time finding a linux distro that would work on it. I soon realized that I really hate Windows and am looking for a replacement OS. I have been using Mint, SolydX, and older Ubuntu versions. I installed the latest Ubuntu with Unity and don't like it but it installed with only a few minor issues. Has anyone tried any other distros on a hybrid laptop with touchscreen? I am not a linux guru. I have used linux for several years but am not comfortable with the command line or the advanced workings in linux. I am an experienced Windows user with an IT background. I just have not delved into administration on Linux. Any help would be appreciated.

Submission + - Federal monies to influence State elections? (reason.com)

bkcallahan writes: Seems a taxpayer-subsidized tour is coming through Oregon — one of the states voting on legalizing marijuana this year — and it seems they're trying to influence a ballot Measure — #91. Regardless of which side you are on with respect to the Measure, shouldn't there be more outrage at this? Why isn't this on the news. Kevin Sabet has been caught on a local forum with an unequivocal message: Vote No On measure 91 http://www.katu.com/news/local...

Submission + - Don't Try To Sell a "Smart" Gun in the U.S. 3

R3d M3rcury writes: How's this for a good idea? A gun that won't fire unless it's within 10 inches of a watch? That's the iP1 from Armatrix. Of course, don't try to sell it here in the United States:

Belinda Padilla does not pick up unknown calls anymore, not since someone posted her cellphone number on an online forum for gun enthusiasts. Then someone snapped pictures of the address where she has a P.O. box and put those online, too. In a crude, cartoonish scrawl, this person drew an arrow to the blurred image of a woman passing through the photo frame. “Belinda?” the person wrote. “Is that you?”

Her offense? Trying to market and sell a new .22-caliber handgun that uses a radio frequency-enabled stopwatch to identify the authorized user so no one else can fire it. Ms. Padilla and the manufacturer she works for, Armatix, intended to make the weapon the first “smart gun” for sale in the United States.

“I have no qualms with the idea of personally and professionally leveling the life of someone who has attempted to profit from disarming me and my fellow Americans,” one commenter wrote.

Their complaint? The gubmint...

Submission + - Apple's Spotty Record Of Giving Back To The Tech Industry (itworld.com)

chicksdaddy writes: One of the meta-stories to come out of the Heartbleed (http://heartbleed.com/) debacle is the degree to which large and wealthy companies have come to rely on third party code (http://blog.veracode.com/2014/04/heartbleed-and-the-curse-of-third-party-code/) — specifically, open source software maintained by volunteers on a shoestring budget. Adding insult to injury is the phenomenon of large, incredibly wealthy companies that gladly pick the fruit of open source software, but refusing to peel off a tiny fraction of their profits to financially support those same groups.

Exhibit 1: Apple Computer. On Friday, IT World ran a story that looks at Apple's long history of not giving back to the technology and open source community. The article cites three glaring examples: Apple's non-support of the Apache Software Foundation (despite bundling Apache with OS X), as well as its non-support of OASIS and refusal to participate in the Trusted Computing Group (despite leveraging TCG-inspired concepts, like AMDs Secure Enclave in iPhone 5s).

Given Apple's status as the world's most valuable company and its enormous cash hoard, the refusal to offer even meager support to open source and industry groups is puzzling. From the article:

"Apple bundles software from the Apache Software Foundation with its OS X operating system, but does not financially support the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in any way. That is in contrast to Google and Microsoft, Apple's two chief competitors, which are both Platinum sponsors of ASF — signifying a contribution of $100,000 annually to the Foundation. Sponsorships range as low as $5,000 a year (Bronze), said Sally Khudairi, ASF's Director of Marketing and Public Relations. The ASF is vendor-neutral and all code contributions to the Foundation are done on an individual basis. Apple employees are frequent, individual contributors to Apache. However, their employer is not, Khudairi noted.

The company has been a sponsor of ApacheCon, a for-profit conference that runs separately from the Foundation — but not in the last 10 years. "We were told they didn't have the budget," she said of efforts to get Apple's support for ApacheCon in 2004, a year in which the company reported net income of $276 million on revenue of $8.28 billion."

Carol Geyer at OASIS is quoted saying her organization has done "lots of outreach" to Apple and other firms over the years, and regularly contacts Apple about becoming a member. "Whenever we're spinning up a new working group where we think they could contribute we will reach out and encourage them to join," she said. But those communications always go in one direction, Geyer said, with Apple declining the entreaties.

Today, the company has no presence on any of the Organization's 100-odd active committees, which are developing cross-industry technology standards such as The Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) and the Public-Key Cryptography Standard (PKCS).

Submission + - Big data projects should not start with IT (citeworld.com)

mattydread23 writes: When business leaders talk about big data analytics, two terms repeatedly heard are velocity and value. Business users want to improve the speed at which they can turn data into valuable insights that will help the business operate more efficiently. And they want to see the correlation between the big data being collected and the business innovation that results. That means IT should play only a supporting role.

Submission + - SPAM: The high-tech bubbles that can blow away your illness

diseasestypes writes: Doctors have a new weapon to add to their disease-fighting arsenal — bubbles. Tiny bubbles, smaller than the width of a human hair, are being used to diagnose, treat and prevent illness.

Stroke, cancers, furred arteries and respiratory diseases are among conditions being tackled, and many more potential uses are in the pipeline, including for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and depression.

Link to Original Source

Slashdot Top Deals

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it is too dark to read.

Working...