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Government

Submission + - Appeals court tosses FCC's Indecency Rule (thehill.com)

GovTechGuy writes: The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals threw out the FCC's policy of fining broadcasters for curse words used on live television. The court found that the threat of being fined would ultimately force broadcasters to self-censor their content in violation of the First Amendment. The ruling traces the FCC's change in policy to the 2003 Golden Globe awards, where U2 frontman Bono exclaimed "This is really fucking brilliant" upon winning an award. The ruling also expresses references a Fox decision not to re-broadcast an episode of "That 70s Show" which garnered praised for its capable handling of the topic of masturbation.

Comment Re:Not news (Score 2, Interesting) 374

Correct me if I'm wrong (I very well may be; I'm not overly familiar with the Drake equation), but doesn't that broadcasting time apply mainly to before a civilization has the technology to broadcast? What about when they still broadcast, but in such a way that their signals don't pollute deep space? Is that taken into account?
Security

Submission + - New attack exploits virtually all intranets, VPNs (threatpost.com) 1

redsoxh8r writes: Security researcher Robert Hansen, known as Rsnake, has developed a new class of attacks that abuses a weakness in many corporate intranets and most browsers to compromise remote machines with persistent JavaScript backdoors. Threatpost reports: "The attacks rely on the long-term caching policies of some browsers and take advantage of the collisions that can occur when two different networks use the same non-routable IP address space, which happens fairly often because the amount of address space is quite small. The bottom line is that even a moderately skilled attacker has the ability to compromise remote machines without the use of any vulnerability or weakness in the client software. "If you're even vaguely clever, developing this might take you two hours. It's not that difficult," said Robert Hansen, the researcher who wrote about the attacks in a white paper published this week, called "RFC1918 Caching Security Issues."
Space

Submission + - One-fifth of us have lost sight of Milky Way (cosmosmagazine.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Light pollution has caused one-fifth of the world's population — mostly in Europe, Britain and the U.S. — to lose their ability to see the Milky Way in the night sky. "The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage," said Connie Walker, and astronomer from the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona. Yet "more than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the U.S. population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way."

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