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Submission + - Twitter blocks website supporting Phil Robertson Following anti-gay comments (hollywoodreporter.com)

cultiv8 writes: Social network giant Twitter has reportedly blocked users from tweeting the phrase "iStandWithPhil.com," a hashtag representing the petition drive to have Phil Robertson reinstated to A&E's "Duck Dynasty" reality show. Robertson was indefinitely suspended from the show last week after he described homosexuality as a sin in an interview with GQ Magazine. The organization running the organization does not know why it is being blocked, as a diagnostic page says the site "has not hosted malicious software over the past 90 days."

Submission + - Application security is non-existent and my boss doesn't care. What should I do?

An anonymous reader writes: I am a senior engineer and software architect at a fortune 500 company and manage a brand (website + mobile apps) that is a household name for anyone with kids. This year we migrated to a new technology platform including server hosting and application framework. I was brought in towards the end of the migration and overall it's been a smooth transition from the users' perspective. However it's a security nightmare for sysadmins (which is all outsourced) and a gloryhole for any hacker with minimal skills. We do weekly and oftentimes daily releases that contain and build upon the same security vulnerabilities. Frequently I do not have control over the code that is deployed, it's simply given to my team by the marketing department. I inform my direct manager and colleagues about security issues before they are deployed and the response is always, "we need to meet deadlines, we can fix security issues at a later point." I'm at a loss at what I should do. Should I go over my manager's head and inform her boss? Approach legal and tell them about our many violations of COPPA? Should I refuse to deploy code until these issues are fixed? Should I look for a new job? What would you do in my situation?
Google

Submission + - Google selects 8,000 Glass Explorer Winners (time.com)

cultiv8 writes:

Google has picked out 8,000 people who will be given a chance to don a pair of Internet-connected glasses and make a fashion statement likely to be envied by gadget-loving geeks around the world. The pool selected by Google won a contest conducted last month requiring U.S. residents to submit 50-word applications through Twitter or Google’s Plus to explain how they would use a technology that is being hailed as the next breakthrough in mobile computing. Google Inc. began notifying the winners Tuesday.

I'm a winner as long as I wasn't disqualified.

Google

Submission + - Google wants to be a wireless carrier (bgr.com)

zacharye writes: Google has already conquered the software side of smartphones and now the technology giant is reportedly in talks to take over the air waves. A report on Thursday claims that Google has held talks with satellite television provider Dish Network regarding the possibility of a venture that would see Google launch its own cellular network and compete directly with the likes of Verizon and AT&T...
Education

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Next career steps for developer turning engineer

An anonymous reader writes: I currently work as a "practice lead" at a medium-sized consulting firm, which is to say I manage a team of 6-10 PHP/LAMP programmers to build enterprise CMSs and applications. While I enjoy what I do, I've recently been considering a second bachelors degree and really a new career in engineering. Specifically I'm interested in the combination of mechanics, electronics, and computing, which is currently pointing me towards the mechatronics field of engineering. My goal is to be able to understand, from start to finish, how an "electronic" product is designed, manufactured, and brought to market. My challenge is finding the right program; I have 2 masters degrees (statistics and an MBA) but lack the core math/physics knowledge that any engineering student should grasp. I have 10+ years experience programming (Perl, Python, PHP, VB, nothing in C or C++) and needless to say would like to learn more CS theory. So my question /.: What programs/disciplines do you recommend? What should I study on my own vs. what to study in the university? What skills should I expect to learn on-the-job vs. in the university?
Software

Submission + - how to re-enter the job market as a software engin (ulsanonline.com) 4

martypantsROK writes: It's been over 15 years since my main job was a software engineer. Since then I have held positions as a Sales Engineer, then spent a few years actually doing sales as a sales rep (and found I hated it) and then got into teaching. I am still a teacher but I want to really get back into writing code for a living. In the past couple of years I've done a great deal of Javascript, PHP, Ajax, and Java, including some Android apps.
So here's the question...how likely would I be to actually get a job writing code? Is continual experience in the field a must, or can a job candidate demonstrate enough current relevance and experience (minus an actual job) with a multi-year hiatus from software development jobs? I'll add, if you haven't already done the math, that I'm over 50 years old.

Submission + - H5N1 Bird Influenza - not a credible threat (cbsnews.com) 9

rubycodez writes: "A 39 year old bus driver has died of H5N1 in Shenzhen, a city next to Hong Kong. But none of the 120 people he had close contact with show any signs of infection with the virus. Usually only those with close contact with dead animals get H5N1, and there are no cases of person to person transmission. In the last seven years, less than 350 people have died from H5N1. Meanwhile, they more common flus that children bring home from school every year will kill tens of thousands. It is time to stop worrying about a rare disease that has killed hardly anyone, and put to rest the hype."
Media

Submission + - The New York Times' Kitchen Table of the Future (niemanlab.org) 1

bughunter writes: "Matt Boggie, The Times Co.'s Media & Technology Strategist for R&D, demonstrates the Times' screen-top version of a kitchen table. It's based on Microsoft's Surface technology, modified by the Times' R&D Lab to create a Times-oriented user experience that reimagines the old "around the breakfast table" reading of the paper. The prototypes on display at the R&D Lab consider how news can be used, in particular, in the home, woven into the intimate contexts of the morning coffee."
China

Submission + - Chinese want to capture an asteroid (dvice.com)

geekmansworld writes: "Dvice reports that the Chinese want to capture an asteroid into earth's orbit and mine it. From the article: "At first glance, nudging an asteroid closer to Earth seems like one of those "what could possible go wrong" scenarios that we generally try and avoid, and for good reason: large asteroid impacts are bad times. The Chinese, though, seem fairly optimistic that they could tweak the orbit of a near-Earth asteroid by just enough (a change in velocity of only about 1,300 feet-per-second or so) to get it to temporarily enter Earth orbit at about twice the distance as the Moon.""
The Military

Submission + - Top General: Defense Department IT In 'Stone Age' (computerworld.com) 1

CWmike writes: "U.S. Marine Corps Gen. James 'Hoss' Cartwright, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was sharply critical Tuesday of the the department is pretty much in the Stone Age as far as IT is concerned,' Cartwright said. He cited problems with proprietary systems that aren't connected to anything else and are unable to quickly adapt to changing needs. 'We have huge numbers of data links that move data between proprietary platforms — one point to another point,' he said. The most striking example of an IT failure came during the second Gulf War, where Marines and the Army were dispatched in southern Iraq, he said. 'It's crazy, we buy proprietary [and] we don't understand what it is we're buying into,' he said. 'It works great for an application, and then you come to conflict and you spend the rest of your time trying to modify it to actually do what it should do.'"
Earth

Submission + - World's Largest Visualization Analytics Display (smartertechnology.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: An 80-foot wide visualization screen at California ISO graphically displays sensor readings from thousands of smart meters as well as provides predictive analytics. By analyzing the grid and environmental inputs like where the wild fires are burning, Space-Time Insights claims its algorithms head off power outages before they can materialize, turning California ISO operators into forecasters instead of damage controllers. If it keeps the lights on and the air conditioners running, I'm all for it!
Security

Submission + - Cancer cluster possibly found among TSA workers (epic.org)

OverTheGeicoE writes: TSA employees at Logan International Airport believe they have identified a cancer cluster in their ranks, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act and released by the Electronic Privacy Information Center. They have requested dosimetry to counter "TSA's improperly non-monitored radiation threat". So far, at least, they have not received it.

The documents also reveal a document from Johns Hopkins that in effect questions whether it is even safe to stand near an operating scanner, let alone inside one. Also, the National Institute of Standards and Technology says that the Dept. of Homeland Security "mischaracterized" their work by telling USA Today that NIST affirmed the safety of the scanners when in fact NIST does not do product safety testing and never tested a scanner for safety.

Android

Submission + - Dispute Damages Would Exceed Android Revenues (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "A new document in a year-old patent lawsuit filed by Oracle against Google over Android intellectual property suggests Oracle could be seeking huge damages from Google. The damages owed to Oracle, if granted by federal Judge William Alsup for the U.S. District Court for Northern California, would 'far exceed any money Google has ever earned with Android' and could lead to a rewrite of Android's Dalvik virtual machine, considered integral to Android and used by Android device manufacturers and potentially thousands of Android app developers, wrote one blogger, Florian Mueller, who writes about intellectual property issues involving the software industry."
Android

Submission + - Android malware set to double says Kaspersky (computerweekly.com)

doperative writes: Mobile malware is set to at least double that of 2010 based on the number of new malware signatures detected in the first quarter of the year, says Kaspersky Lab ..

The growth will be driven by the growth in popularity of Google's Android mobile operating system, according to the firm's first quarter security threat report.

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