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Networking

Submission + - Security of open-source software again being scrutinized (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "recent round of flaws discovered in open-source software has reignited concerns that security is getting bypassed in the rush to continue expanding the large and extremely popular code base used by millions. For instance, although the Java-based Spring Framework was criticized by security researchers in January as having a major flaw that allowed remote-code execution by attackers against applications built with it, the updates to Spring this week don't address this security problem."
Communications

Submission + - Artificial aurora lights-up arctic skies (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "It did not light up the sky like real aurora borealis can but researchers with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory said they have created an artificial version that can be used to explore ionospheric occurrences and their impact on communications, navigation and space weather. Specifically what the researchers did was produce what they called a "sustained high density plasma cloud in Earth's upper atmosphere," using the 3.6-megawatt High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter facility, Gakona, Alaska."
Networking

Submission + - West Virginia auditor blasts Cisco, state for "oversized" router buy (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "West Virginia wasted millions in federal grant money when it purchased 1,164 Cisco routers for $24 million in 2010, a state audit concluded. A report issued this month by the West Virginia Legislative Auditor found the state used a "legally unauthorized purchasing process" when awarding the router contract, paid for with federal stimulus funds, to Cisco. The auditor also found Cisco "showed a wanton indifference to the interests of the public" in recommending the investment in its model 3945 branch routers, the majority of which were "oversized" for the requirements of the state agencies using them, the report stated.
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Communications

Submission + - Drones still face major communications challenges getting onto US airspace (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Communications and effective system control are still big challenges unmanned aircraft developers are facing if they want unfettered access to US airspace. Those were just a couple of the conclusions described in a recent Government Accountability Office report on the status of unmanned aircraft and the national airspace. The bottom line for now seems to be that while research and development efforts are under way to mitigate obstacles to safe and routine integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace, these efforts cannot be completed and validated without safety, reliability, and performance standards, which have not yet been developed because of data limitations"
Networking

Submission + - What if Ethernet failed? (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Token Ring? FDDI? What would the networking world look like if Ethernet hadn't won? "Standards, consistency, simplicity, scale and innovation would have suffered," says IDC analyst Rohit Mehra. "If there was no consistency, networking would be even more complex than it is today.""
Android

Submission + - Sandia lab fires up 300,000 virtual Android devices to test out security (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Researchers with the Sandia National Laboratory have tied together 300,000 virtual Android-based devices in an effort to study the security and reliability of large smartphone networks. The Android project, dubbed MegaDroid, is carefully insulated from other networks at the Labs and the outside world, but can be built up into a realistic computing environment, the researchers stated."
Networking

Submission + - 'Net pioneer Kleinrock still kicking out emerging technologies (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "It's not hard to find Internet pioneer Dr. Leonard Kleinrock — he's been at UCLA for 50 years, since 1963. His current position is not too much different than it's always been: distinguished professor of computer science. But he's also involved, and has been involved, in several other ventures outside of UCLA"
Networking

Submission + - Insider security threat gets a serious look by US protection agencies (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "Interesting study out today that took an in-depth look at 80 insider security cases and developed patterns of behavior that could help private companies, government, and law enforcement more better prevent, deter, detect, investigate, and manage this devious problem.
The study, “Insider Threat Study: Illicit Cyber Activity Involving Fraud in the U.S. Financial Services Sector” funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in collaboration with the U.S. Secret Service (USSS) and the CERT Insider Threat Center, part of Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute looked at what they called technical and behavioral patterns from 67 insider and 13 external fraud cases that occurred between 2005 and now to develop “insights and risk indicators of malicious insider activity.”"

Google

Submission + - Would you open your home to a hacker – for free? (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "What do you get when you mix access to Google's ultra-fast fiber network and old fashioned grass roots business ideas? Well, in this case you'd get someone living on your couch for free for three months. This week a group calling itself the "Kansas City Hacker Homes," launched a program that calls on the good folks of Kansas City to open up their homes to entrepreneurs and developers who would live and work there for a period of three months, rent and utility free. They have to buy their own food."
Networking

Submission + - The fascinating world of the ubiquitous antenna (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: The antenna — it has been around so long and is mounted and used so routinely it is rarely even noticed. But such antenna technology has changed a lot over the years and has gone into space, war, water and just about anywhere else you can imagine. Here we take a look the world of the ubiquitous antenna.
Google

Submission + - Google goes IPv6 for internal network (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "In a project that has taken longer than company engineers anticipated, Google is rolling out IPv6 across its entire internal employee network.

Google network engineer Irena Nikolova discussed the company-wide implementation and shared some lessons that other organizations might benefit from as they migrate their own networks to the next generation Internet Protocol."

Networking

Submission + - FBI takes out $14M DNS malware operation (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "US law enforcement today said it had smashed what it called a massive, sophisticated Internet fraud scheme that injected malware in more than four million computers in over 100 countries while generating $14 million in illegitimate income. Of the computers infected with malware, at least 500,000 were in the United States, including computers belonging to U.S. government agencies, such as NASA."

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