Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
AI

Submission + - AI programmers struggle to makes games 'imitate life' (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "Artificial intelligence, a field of programming employed by video game developers to make characters smarter and improve their decisions, still has a ways to go before it actually yields intelligent characters. "There are AI games with very little 'I' in them," said Brian Schwab, senior AI and gameplay engineer at Blizzard Entertainment, which has published the hugely successful "Warcraft," "StarCraft" and "Diablo" series of strategy games."
NASA

Submission + - NASA IG paints bleak picture for agency projects, IT security (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The bottom line for NASA as well as any number of government agencies in this new era of sequestration is money — and NASA in this case has too many programs chasing too few dollars. That is just one of a number of bleak conclusions NASA's Inspector General Paul Martin laid out to a Congressional hearing today adding that "declining budgets and fiscal uncertainties present the most significant external challenges to NASA's ability to successfully move forward on its many projects and programs. For the first 6 months of this year, NASA has operated under a continuing resolution that funds the Agency at last year's level of $17.8 billion. Moreover, NASA's share of the Government-wide sequestration cuts reduce that spending authority by $894 million.""
The Internet

Submission + - Preserving the "Web before the Web:" Minitel history could be lost (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "It's been almost a year since France Telecom shut down its once widely popular Minitel online services and historians are worried that its legacy from a preservationist point of view is being lost forever. The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA., naturally wants to collect and preserve all manner of industry historical artifacts and Minitel if one of the central components of its "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing" exhibit."
IBM

Submission + - IBM: In the next 5 years computers will learn, mimic the human senses (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "IBM today issued its seventh annual look at what Big Blue researchers think will be the five biggest technologies for the next five years. In past prediction packages known as "IBM 5 in 5" the company has had some success in predicting the future of password protection, telemedicine and nanotechnology."
Google

Submission + - Quick Look: Google Glass goes high-fashion (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Functionality be damned, these are high-fashion times apparently and Google went all out over the weekend showing off its wrap-around Project Glass computer glasses at New York’s Fashion Week. Fashion mogul Diane von Furstenberg utilized the glasses in her show and a host of models ran them down the runway. The actual glasses you may recall can stream data to the lenses, and feature a built-in camera and a number of other high-tech features."
Apple

Submission + - Rare operating Apple 1 rakes in $374,500 at Sotheby's auction (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "It's not one of a kind but pretty darn close. Sotheby's this week auctioned off a rare working Apple 1 computer for $374,500 to an unnamed bidder. The price was more than double the expected price listed on the Sotheby's web site.
The Sotheby's notes about the Apple 1 say it is one of six thought to be operational boxes and one of about 50 known to exist."

IBM

Submission + - ENIAC, world's first digital computer, turns 66 (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Introduced to the world on Feb. 14, 1946, the ENIAC — Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer — was developed by the University of Pennsylvania's John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert under a 1943 contract with the U.S. Army. It was the world's first large-scale electronic general-purpose digital computer, and its development was the birth of large computing systems that dominated the industry for years to come."
Technology

Submission + - Computer factories are the energy hogs (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The main idea behind saving energy in the high-tech world has been to buy newer, more energy efficient devices, but researchers say maybe that’s the wrong way to look at the issue, since as much as 70% of the energy a typical laptop will consume during its life span is used in manufacturing the computer.
More energy would be conserved by reducing power used in the manufacturing of computers, rather than reducing only the amount of energy required to operate them say researchers from the Arizona State University and Rochester Institute of Technology."

Science

Submission + - Too late? China's rare earth threat tweaks US (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: In the face of China wielding menacing control over 97% of the world's rare earth materials, the US House of Representatives this week passed a bill that would bolster research and development of the key elements and help find substitutions for the materials. Rare earth metals are used to build everything from wind turbines, hybrid-vehicle batteries, weapons guidance systems, oil refining catalysts, computer disk drives, televisions and monitors, compact fluorescent light bulbs and fiber optic cable.

Slashdot Top Deals

Recent research has tended to show that the Abominable No-Man is being replaced by the Prohibitive Procrastinator. -- C.N. Parkinson

Working...