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Submission + - How Walmart is going all out with mobile (

concealment writes: "Walmart will use you location to provide you with an app designed specifically for that store. Head to another Walmart and your app will work for that store. It has useful features: You can make a list by speaking into the phone. You can search a product by typing in a name — tissues, say, or light bulbs — and the app will show you what aisle to go to. It has an interactive map. It lets you scan items as you shop, so you can go quickly through self-checkout. And it shows you promotions specific to that store.

  Perhaps most importantly, the app lets you easily buy an item online that you don't find in the store. So if you're shopping for a pink bike, and the store you're in only has it in blue, you can tap on the app and instantly order the pink bike.

The result: Two weeks after Walmart launched "in-store mode" with its app, roughly 60 percent of its shoppers opted to use it. Moreover, about 12 percent of Walmart's online sales are now coming from customers who are inside a store and using "in-store mode." All of Walmart's 4,000 U.S. stores have an "in-store app.""


Submission + - How to add 5.5 petabytes and get banned from Costco during a hard drive crisis (

concealment writes: "“We buy lots and lots of hard drives . . . . [They] are the single biggest cost in the entire company.”

Those are the words of Backblaze Founder and CEO Gleb Budman, whose company offers unlimited cloud backup for just $5 a month, and fills 50TB worth of new storage a day in its custom-built, open source pod architecture. So one might imagine the cloud storage startup was pretty upset when flooding in Thailand caused a global shortage on internal hard drives last year.

Backblaze details much the process in a Tuesday-morning blog post, including the hijinks that followed as the company got creative trying to figure out ways around the new hard drive limits. Maps were drawn, employees were cut off from purchasing hard drives at Costco — both in-person throughout Silicon Valley and online (despite some great efforts to avoid detection, such as paying for hard drives online using gift cards) — and friends and family across the country were conscripted into a hard-drive-buying army."

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