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Submission + - How Intel's faith in x86 cost it the mobile market (

concealment writes: "Intel executives continue to claim that the key benefit of x86 is compatibility: with Windows and with the vast library of application software already coded for the platform. Otellini banked on buyers wanting to run that software on their mobile devices too.

May be they do, though there’s no real evidence to show that that’s the case. Certainly, users have exerted little pressure on makers of ARM-based mobile devices to develop x86-based versions that can run Windows and Windows apps. Yes, Microsoft is offering an x86 version of its Surface tablet, but that’s as much about Redmond playing all the angles as a firm sense that some folk don’t want an ARM-based Surface."


Submission + - How Walmart is going all out with mobile (

concealment writes: "Walmart will use you location to provide you with an app designed specifically for that store. Head to another Walmart and your app will work for that store. It has useful features: You can make a list by speaking into the phone. You can search a product by typing in a name — tissues, say, or light bulbs — and the app will show you what aisle to go to. It has an interactive map. It lets you scan items as you shop, so you can go quickly through self-checkout. And it shows you promotions specific to that store.

  Perhaps most importantly, the app lets you easily buy an item online that you don't find in the store. So if you're shopping for a pink bike, and the store you're in only has it in blue, you can tap on the app and instantly order the pink bike.

The result: Two weeks after Walmart launched "in-store mode" with its app, roughly 60 percent of its shoppers opted to use it. Moreover, about 12 percent of Walmart's online sales are now coming from customers who are inside a store and using "in-store mode." All of Walmart's 4,000 U.S. stores have an "in-store app.""


Submission + - Now that it's here, is there a place for Windows RT? (

concealment writes: "This is a point that takes a while to sink in. Does Windows RT support multiple users? Yes, because Windows 8 does. Does Windows RT support Flash in Internet Explorer 10? Yes, because Windows 8 does. Can Windows RT run Internet Explorer 10 on the desktop as well as in Metro? Yes, because Windows 8 can. Does Windows RT have the same bundled applications, like Mail, Video, Music, Weather, and so on? Yes, because Windows 8 does. Does Windows RT support Bluetooth mice and keyboards, USB hubs? Yes, because Windows 8 does. As a general rule, if Windows 8 has a feature Windows RT has the same feature.

This is not to say that getting Windows running on ARM was a trivial undertaking. Typical ARM SoCs don't use PCI for their integrated peripherals or ATA for their mass storage, and so Windows had to be modified to not require PCI and to support booting from MMC storage. But those changes are now part of core Windows; Windows 8 systems built around Intel's Clover Trail platform will also use MMC."


Submission + - Is mobile broadband a luxury or human right? ( 1

concealment writes: "Moderating a discussion on the future of broadband, Mashable editor-in-chief Lance Ulanoff tossed a provocative question to the audience: "By quick show of hands, how many out there think that broadband is a luxury?"

Next question: "How many out there think it is a human right?" That option easily carried the audience vote."


Submission + - Conservative voters less likely to use smartphones (

concealment writes: "Pew found that while liberal, conservative and independent voters are equally likely to own a cell phone, only 40% of conservative voters own a smartphone, significantly fewer than liberal (56%) or moderate (55%) voters. Also, only 68% of conservatives use text messaging, compared to 78% of moderates and 81% of liberals.

Getting news is a popular election-related activity: 27% of cell phone-owning voters do this, especially those under age 50. Liberals (37%) are more likely to get election or political news on their phones than moderates (28%) or conservatives (25%)."

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