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Power

Submission + - Swiss to end use of nuclear power (reuters.com)

mdsolar writes: "Energy minister Doris Leuthard is set to propose Switzerland gradually exits nuclear power, two Swiss newspapers reported on Sunday, citing sources close to the government.

The multi-party Swiss government was expected to make an announcement on nuclear policy on Wednesday and may recommend an exit.

Switzerland's five nuclear reactors generate about 40 percent of the country's electricity."

Desktops (Apple)

Submission + - Don't Panic Over the Latest Mac Malware Stories (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Many recent stories are suggesting a large increase in customers who are complaining about malware in Apple support forums. All of these posts are meant to persuade readers that, indeed, the Mac is becoming just like Windows: malware-laden and dangerous.

As with most stories Mac-related, recent malware-is-finally-coming stories attracted a lot of press. It made the rounds across the tech world, started a huge flame war on Slashdot, and set Twitter afire.

It has taken the Windows malware supply chain twenty years to evolve to its current level of stratification and sophistication. It stands to reason that supply chain won’t be replicated overnight for the Mac.

Here is why Mac OS might not be as attractive to attackers as you might think and how the Mac is relatively low-risk computing platform this month, and will continue to be one next month, too.

Amiga

Submission + - What will the upcoming C64 / Amiga reboot change? (commodoreusa.net) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Commodore USA is close to starting production of the new C64s and Amigas it has been designing around modern PC hardware. A new OS nobody has seen yet — Commodore OS 1.0 — is also in the works. COS will, amongst other things, allow "games for the Commodore PET, Vic20, C16, C64, C128 and AMIGA" to be played on the new machines in emulation mode. It also promises "a distinctive, attractive, advanced and stable operating system experience".

Will these machines only interest a few hundred thousand people who grew up with a C64 or Amiga at home and are feeling nostalgic? Or could the new machines become wildly popular, sell millions of units just like in the old days and possibly signify a true "return" or "resurrection" of the long extinct "Commodore Platform"? Could this "old-new" platform possibly then become a popular 4th choice for people who want neither a Windows PC, nor a Mac, nor a Linux box? Could the new Amiga lineup in particular, which features fairly powerful hardware, become a renewed magnet for cool audio, video, 2D/3D graphics, music apps and other creative software like the old Amiga was? Will we walk into game shops and see dedicated "Amiga Games" again?

Internet Explorer

Submission + - Feedback from IE9 bug reports

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft offers http://connect.microsoft.com/ that allows developers to file IE9 bugs. Has anyone here actually gotten feedback from these reports and seen things be fixed? I personally have already filed 3 bugs against IE9 in only a week or so of testing.
Nintendo

Submission + - 3DS battery is Quick to die and Slow to charge (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "Everyone is interested in the real-world performance of the 3DS battery. It's as bad as we feared, with five hours of play seeming to be the best-case scenario. "

it also takes 3.5 hours to charge

Businesses

Submission + - AT&T and T-Mobile Merger Is Bad For Consumers

adeelarshad82 writes: AT&T recently announced that it will buy T-Mobile for $39 billion. If the transaction gets approved by the government and closes in a year as planned, it will create the nation's largest wireless carrier by far. While this is great news for both companies, analyst believe that it's an awful idea for end consumers for a number of different reasons from obvious ones like rise in rates due to lower competition to others like more selective phone choices for consumers.
Space

Submission + - Was The Early Universe 2 Dimensional Spacetime? (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "According to two theoretical physicists, our current four-dimensional Universe (3 dimensions of space, 1 dimension of time) is actually an evolution from a lower-dimensional state. The early Universe may have existed with just one spatial dimension (plus one time dimension) up until the Universe cooled below an energy state of 100 TeV. At this point, a transition occurred when the spatial dimension "folded" to create 2 dimensions. At 1 TeV, it folded again to create the Universe we know today: 3 dimensions of space, one of time. This may sound like a purely theoretical study, but there might be evidence of the evolution of universal dimensions in cosmic ray measurements and, potentially, in gravitational wave cut-off frequency."
Businesses

Submission + - Man Convicted of Issuing Competing Currency (fbi.gov) 15

roman_mir writes: This FBI file is about a North Carolina man, who is convicted of minting silver coins, which compete with the currency issued by the US Mint.

The 67 year old is is facing 15 years of prison time and $250,000 fine as well as confiscation of $7,000,000 worth of silver and silver coins.

Following an eight-day trial and less than two hours of deliberation, von NotHaus, the founder and monetary architect of a currency known as the Liberty Dollar, was found guilty by a jury in Statesville, North Carolina, of making coins resembling and similar to United States coins; of issuing, passing, selling, and possessing Liberty Dollar coins; of issuing and passing Liberty Dollar coins intended for use as current money; and of conspiracy against the United States.

Von NotHaus designed the Liberty Dollar currency in 1998 and the Liberty coins were marked with the dollar sign ($); the words dollar, USA, Liberty, Trust in God (instead of In God We Trust); and other features associated with legitimate U.S. coinage.

In coordination with the Department of Justice, on September 14, 2006, the United States Mint issued a press release and warning to American citizens that the Liberty Dollar was “not legal tender.”

Article I, section 8, clause 5 of the United States Constitution delegates to Congress the power to coin money and to regulate the value thereof.

“Attempts to undermine the legitimate currency of this country are simply a unique form of domestic terrorism,” U.S. Attorney Tompkins said in announcing the verdict. “While these forms of anti-government activities do not involve violence, they are every bit as insidious and represent a clear and present danger to the economic stability of this country,” she added. “We are determined to meet these threats through infiltration, disruption, and dismantling of organizations which seek to challenge the legitimacy of our democratic form of government.”

Of-course the value of the US dollar under the US government has been in steady decline ever since the creation of the Federal reserve bank. Here is some data on how much value US dollar lost only in the last 25 years.

US Mint does not like competition, so it would be interesting to see its take on JP Morgan announcing that they are accepting physical gold as collateral with its counterparties.

Submission + - RSA SecurID two-factor authentication hacked (rsa.com)

religious freak writes: The two factor authentication SecurID used by many corporations and the US government for security has been hacked by an "Advanced Persistent Threat (APT)". "[T]his information could potentially be used to reduce the effectiveness of a current two-factor authentication implementation"
Technology

Submission + - 'Pruned' Microchips Twice as Fast and Efficient (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: If you had to use a commuting bicycle in a race, you would probably set about removing the kickstand, fenders, racks and lights to make the thing as fast and efficient as possible. When engineers at Houston's Rice University are developing small, fast, energy-efficient chips for use in devices like hearing aids, it turns out they do pretty much the same thing. The removal of portions of circuits that aren't essential to the task at hand is known as "probabilistic pruning," and it results in chips that are twice as fast, use half the power, and are half the size of conventional chips.

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