Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Woman charged with wiretapping for filming cops wins $57,000 payout (arstechnica.com)

mpicpp writes: A local New Hampshire police department agreed Thursday to pay a woman who was arrested and charged with wiretapping $57,000 to settle her civil rights lawsuit. The deal comes a week after a federal appeals court ruled that the public has a "First Amendment" right to film cops.

The plaintiff in the case, Carla Gericke, was arrested on wiretapping allegations in 2010 for filming her friend being pulled over by the Weare Police Department during a late-night traffic stop. Although Gericke was never brought to trial, she sued, alleging that her arrest constituted retaliatory prosecution in breach of her constitutional rights. The department, without admitting wrongdoing, settled Thursday in a move that the woman's attorney speculated would deter future police "retaliation."

The First US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled (PDF) in Gericke's case last week that she was "exercising a clearly established First Amendment right when she attempted to film the traffic stop in the absence of a police order to stop filming or leave the area."

Submission + - Boston Bombing Suspect Identified from Lord & Taylor video (newjerseynewsroom.com)

An anonymous reader writes: There are conflicting reports whether an arrest was made today regarding the Boston Marathon bombings.

Earlier today, CNN's John King reported that authorities had identified a suspect based on an analysis of video from a Lord & Taylor department store near the site of the second blast, and that video from a Boston TV station also helped. King cited a source who was briefed on the investigation.

A federal law enforcement source told CNN's Fran Townsend that someone was arrested. But two senior administration officials and another federal official then told Townsend that there had been a misunderstanding among officials and that no one has been arrested.

Scores of victims of the Boston bombing remained in hospitals, many with grievous injuries. Doctors who treated the wounded corroborated reports that the bombs were packed with shrapnel intended to cause mayhem. In addition to the 5-year-old child, a 9-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy were among 17 victims listed in critical condition. (ESPN Boston)

Submission + - Is Google SoC supporting the open hardware movement? (publiclab.org)

jywarren writes: Open source community Public Lab http://publiclab.org/ is a mentoring org this year for Google Summer of Code, meaning that you can now apply for funding to work on CERN OHL licensed projects from spectrometric matching to kite-photography georectifying. Does this indicate support by Google for the open hardware movement? Or the DIY environmental movement?
Iphone

Submission + - 10 ways Apple is looking more like Microsoft (itnews.com.au)

schliz writes: iPhone app developer Darren Winterford considers himself an admirer of Apple, but if they genuinely care about their brand, they may need to address a few concerns that have began to disillusion even some of their most faithful, he says. With a growing propensity for secrecy, paranoia, trademark battles and regulatory exemptions, is Apple beginning to act like the very brand it set out to crush?
Science

Submission + - Working Terahertz Lens Enables X-Ray Vision (sciencemag.org)

cremeglace writes: X-ray-like imaging without the harmful radiation and cell phones with more bandwidth are closer to reality now that researchers have developed a novel type of lens that works with terahertz frequencies. The new lens is a metamaterial, an artificial material with a structure made from many tiny parts, and it could drastically expand what lenses can do. ScienceNOW has the full article.
Microsoft

Submission + - Internet Explorer 9 Will Not Support Windows XP (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: "As it turns out, news is this week that the same features that made IE9's hardware-acceleration possible, probably aren't compatible with Windows XP. Microsoft initially dodged giving a straight answer to the question of XP support but has since admitted that the new browser won't be XP-compatible when it launches. This has created a small tempest of protest from those users still using XP, but this is less of an arbitrary decision than some appear to think. It's literally impossible to port Windows Vista/Win 7-style hardware acceleration backwards to XP. Microsoft would have to either develop a workaround from scratch or create a CPU-driven "software mode." Using such a mode could easily max out a CPU or at the very least, negatively impact system speed and battery life."

Slashdot Top Deals

It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats.

Working...