Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - Peace Corps Gang Rape: U.S. Agency Ignored Warning (go.com)

An anonymous reader writes: More than 1,000 young American women have been raped or sexually assaulted in the last decade while serving as Peace Corps volunteers in foreign countries, an ABC News 20/20 investigation has found. In some cases, victims say, the Peace Corps has ignored safety concerns and later tried to blame the women who were raped for bringing on the attacks.

Between 2000 and 2009, Peace Corps figures show there were 221 rapes or attempted rapes, 147 major sexual attacks and 719 other sexual assaults—defined as unwanted or forced kissing, fondling or groping.

According to the figures, there is a yearly average of 22 rapes. There were 15 in the year for which the figures are most recently available, 2009

Peace Corps officials say the number of rapes has gradually declined over the decade.

The Internet

Submission + - Cable Subscribers Flee, But Is Internet To Blame (npr.org)

An anonymous reader writes: TV subscribers are ditching their cable companies at an ever faster rate in the past few months, and many of them aren't signing up with a satellite or phone competitor instead.Third-quarter results reported this week by major cable and satellite TV companies show major losses, but don't settle the question of what's causing them. On Thursday, Time Warner Cable Inc.'s chief operating officer, Landel Hobbs, said the company doesn't see evidence of people dropping cable in favor of the Internet. He said the biggest subscriber losses have been among people who don't have cable broadband services; high-speed Internet — from cable or a competitor — is key to watching video online. These people seem to be going to satellite or giving up on pay TV entirely.

On the theory that college students might be among the first to drop cable TV, the company looked at changes in subscriber figures in college towns such as Austin, Texas, and Columbus, Ohio. They weren't out of line with previous years, and they corresponded to the level of student enrollment, he said.Cable companies have been losing video subscribers for some time, but they have been compensating by upgrading basic subscribers to more expensive digital tiers, as well as adding broadband and phone subscribers.

However, both Time Warner Cable and Cablevision Systems Corp. lost digital video subscribers in the third quarter. Both added record-low number of phone subscribers, as years of growth are coming to an end.

Politics

Submission + - Court declare Labour MP's election void (yahoo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The specially convened election court ruled Mr Woolas' election to Parliament void due to illegal practices undertaken during his campaign. They found the 50-year old guilty of knowingly making false statements about an opponent.

Mr Woolas was found guilty of attacking his opponent's personal conduct and character with statements that he courted Muslim extremists who had advocated violence against the Labour MP.

He had suggested Mr Watkins had refused to condemn such threats in pursuit of personal advantage. Both statements were untrue and Mr Woolas knew them to be, the judges said

Democrats

Submission + - Winning Party Backers Do More Porn Searches (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With the Republicans handily winning a whole bunch of House seats in the elections, apparently you can expect the amount of searching for internet porn to increase in the states that voted Republican. Sound ridiculous? Yes, but apparently it's science. On The Media points us to the news of a new study that looked at porn searches before and after elections and found that they tend to increase in states that support the "winning" party. Of course, I'd take these results with a pretty serious grain of salt, but the study's authors note that they're statistically significant. You can read the whole study (pdf) if you'd like. The abstract is:

        The current study examined whether or not individuals who vicariously win a competition seek out pornography relatively more often than individuals who vicariously lose a competition. By examining a portion of Google keyword searches during the 2004, 2006 and 2008 US election cycles, the relative popularity of online pornography keywords searches was computed for each state and the District of Columbia the week before and the week after each election. Consistent with the Challenge Hypothesis, following all three election cycles, individuals located in states voting for the winning political party tended to search for pornography keywords relatively more often than individuals residing in states voting for the losing political party.

The "Challenge Hypothesis," if you're unfamiliar with it, is the idea that competition itself increases testosterone in men, and winning a competition increases testosterone even more — and this includes just witnessing the competition. So, other studies have apparently found increases in testosterone in men watching their favorite sports teams win. So this study looked at whether or not porn searches might act as a proxy for such increased testosterone.

Apple

Submission + - Lack of Flash Gives MacBook Air Two Extra Hours (wired.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Having Flash installed can cut battery runtime considerably — as much as 33 percent in our testing. With a handful of websites loaded in Safari, Flash-based ads kept the CPU running far more than seemed necessary, and the best time I recorded with Flash installed was just 4 hours. After deleting Flash, however, the MacBook Air ran for 6:02 — with the exact same set of websites reloaded in Safari, and with static ads replacing the CPU-sucking Flash versions.
Politics

Submission + - Backers of Winning Party Search For More Porn (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With the Republicans handily winning a whole bunch of House seats in the elections, apparently you can expect the amount of searching for internet porn to increase in the states that voted Republican. Sound ridiculous? Yes, but apparently it's science. On The Media points us to the news of a new study that looked at porn searches before and after elections and found that they tend to increase in states that support the "winning" party. Of course, I'd take these results with a pretty serious grain of salt, but the study's authors note that they're statistically significant. You can read the whole study (pdf) if you'd like. The abstract is: The current study examined whether or not individuals who vicariously win a competition seek out pornography relatively more often than individuals who vicariously lose a competition. By examining a portion of Google keyword searches during the 2004, 2006 and 2008 US election cycles, the relative popularity of online pornography keywords searches was computed for each state and the District of Columbia the week before and the week after each election. Consistent with the Challenge Hypothesis, following all three election cycles, individuals located in states voting for the winning political party tended to search for pornography keywords relatively more often than individuals residing in states voting for the losing political party.
Politics

Submission + - Prison Economics Help Drive Ariz. Immigration Law (npr.org)

An anonymous reader writes: NPR spent the past several months analyzing hundreds of pages of campaign finance reports, lobbying documents and corporate records. What they show is a quiet, behind-the-scenes effort to help draft and pass Arizona Senate Bill 1070 by an industry that stands to benefit from it: the private prison industry... According to Corrections Corporation of America reports, executives believe immigrant detention is their next big market. Last year, they wrote that they expect to bring in "a significant portion of our revenues" from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that detains illegal immigrants.

As soon as Pearce's bill hit the Arizona statehouse floor in January, there were signs of ALEC's influence. Thirty-six co-sponsors jumped on, a number almost unheard of in the capitol. According to records obtained by NPR, two-thirds of them either went to that December meeting or are ALEC members.Thirty of the 36 co-sponsors received donations over the next six months, from prison lobbyists or prison companies — Corrections Corporation of America, Management and Training Corporation and The Geo Group.

Privacy

Submission + - The War on Commuters: Panic! (wtop.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The day after federal investigators unveiled an unsuccessful terrorist plot against the D.C. Metro system, transit police are considering implementing one of the most controversial security measures available to them.

Metro police now believe they may have to resort to random bag searches, after learning of the FBI's Wednesday arrest of Farooque Ahmed, 34, of Ashburn, Va., for helping to plan an attack on the D.C. subways.

"We will definitely look at that," Metro Transit Police Chief Michael Taborn tells WTOP.

"That is one of the initiatives that was recommended (by the Federal Transit Administration) to many transit agencies — Boston, New York. So it is a methodology that can be used."

The Economist adds at http://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2010/10/war_commuters
How does this make sense? The feds didn't unveil an unsuccessful terrorist plot. They unveiled a man's willingness to join a fabricated plot. But let us suppose that Mr Ahmed had signed on to an honest-to-goodness mass-murder conspiracy, and that this intrigue is now exposed and its principals rounded up. The chances of an attack are now higher or lower? There is now more or less reason for police to nose through the personal belongings of law-abiding citizens? I say: lower, less. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs seems to suggest as much. "This is another important example of work by the FBI by all levels of our law enforcement and by our national security team to keep this country safe," Mr Gibbs said at a press briefing. If it's working, it's working!

Security

Submission + - U.S. airport security 'completely redundant' (foreignpolicy.com)

An anonymous reader writes: n remarks at the annual conference of the UK Airport Operators Association in London on Tuesday, he said the practice of forcing people to take off their shoes and have their laptops checked separately in security lines should be ditched.

Mr. Broughton said there was no need to "kowtow to the Americans every time they wanted something done" to beef up security on U.S.-bound flights, especially when this involved checks the U.S. did not impose on its domestic routes.

"America does not do internally a lot of the things they demand that we do," he said. "We shouldn't stand for that. We should say, 'We'll only do things which we consider to be essential and that you Americans also consider essential'." [...]

Mr. Broughton said no one wanted weak security, but added: "We all know there's quite a number of elements in the security programme which are completely redundant and they should be sorted out."

Security

Submission + - BA boss slams US airport security (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: The chairman of British Airways has said some "completely redundant" airport security checks should be scrapped and the UK should stop "kowtowing" to US security demands.

Practices such as forcing passengers to take off their shoes should be abandoned, Martin Broughton said.

And he questioned why laptop computers needed to be screened separately.

"We all know there's quite a number of elements in the security programme which are completely redundant and they should be sorted out."

Colin Matthews, chief executive of BAA, said security at Heathrow and its other airports was "defined by the authorities" and consisted of "one requirement laid on top of another".

He added: "There's European requirements, there's UK requirements, and... US requirements laid on top of that.

"We could certainly do a better job for customers if we could rationalise all of that into a single, coherent process, and I'd love to have the chance to do that."

Submission + - Free speech protects Amazon buyers' data (usatoday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Lists that identify the books, music and movies individual customers bought from online retailer Amazon.com are protected from North Carolina tax collectors, a federal judge has ruled.

Amazon said in a lawsuit it filed in April in its hometown of Seattle that disclosing the names, addresses and purchases of its customers as requested by the North Carolina Revenue Department would harm anyone who may have bought controversial books or movies.

U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman ruled late Monday that the First Amendment protects a buyer from the government demanding to know the books, music, and audiovisual products they've bought.

Government

Submission + - The Real Underemployment Figure Is 22.5% (consumerist.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "Officially the unemployment rate is 9.6%, but there's a lot more people out of work than that. If you add on top of that people who have dropped out of the labor-force, as well as people who work part-time but would prefer full-time if they could get it, AND people who have been out of work for over a year, as economist John Williams has done, you get a whopping 22.5% underemployment rate for September"

Submission + - Blizzard Suing Creators Of StarCraft II Hacks (rockpapershotgun.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Blizzard have taken the extremely peculiar decision to ban players from playing StarCraft II for using cheats in the single-player game. This meant that, despite cheating no one but themselves, they were locked out of playing the single-player game. Which is clearly bonkers. But it’s not enough for the developer. Blizzard’s lawyers are now setting out to sue those who create cheats.

Gamespot reports that the megolithic company is chasing after three developers of hacks for “destroying” their online game. It definitely will be in violation of the end user agreement, so there’s a case. However, it’s a certain element of their claim that stands out for attention. They’re claiming using the hacks causes people to infringe copyright:

        “When users of the Hacks download, install, and use the Hacks, they copy StarCraft II copyrighted content into their computer’s RAM in excess of the scope of their limited license, as set forth in the EULA and ToU, and create derivative works of StarCraft II.”

Government

Submission + - More than 2Bil records in US monitoring database (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: "Thousands of US sex offenders, prisoners on parole and other convicts were left unmonitored after an electronic tagging system shut down because of data overload. BI Incorporated, which runs the system, reached its data threshold — more than two billion records — on Tuesday. This left authorities across 49 states unaware of offenders' movement for about 12 hours."

2 Billion records??

Media

Submission + - The Privacy Landmine of Duke ‘Senior Thesis& (forbes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Karen Owen, a 2010 graduate, kept detailed notes on her sexual adventures with 13 members of Duke’s lacrosse, baseball and tennis teams over the last four years. She then put those notes, along with the athletes’ names and photos into a PowerPoint presentation, that concludes with a ranking of the 13 on what she calls her “F*** list.”

Interestingly, Jezebel redacted the names of all those involved and blurred out the athletes’ faces. Deadspin, on the other hand, did not.

When something like this goes viral, it’s hard to keep people’s identities under wraps. Mainstream blogs often deliberate on whether to reveal people’s identities at the risk of being sued for defamation and invasion of privacy. It’s strange that the bloggers at Gawker came to two different conclusions on how to handle it.

What about the male athletes whose names, photos, and tales of sexual prowess (or lack thereof) are now tabloid fodder? I suspect there are going to be invasion of privacy lawsuits in the near future; I imagine their lawyers are already working hard to get Gawker to take the PowerPoints down.

Slashdot Top Deals

Happiness is twin floppies.

Working...