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Apple

Submission + - Steve Jobs' yacht impounded over unpaid bill (nbcnews.com)

capnkr writes: Steve Job's "minimalist" 100 million+ euros yacht "Venus" sits impounded in Amsterdam over contention that only 6 of a promised 9 million euros have been paid to the designer, Philippe Starck. A lawyer for Stark's company said "These guys trusted each other, so there wasn't a very detailed contract.". Jobs was never able to use the yacht prior to his death.
Education

Submission + - Are App Vendors Guilty of "Reverse Redlining"?

theodp writes: Apple iOS parents, reports GeekWire, can pick up the Dr. Seuss classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas in app form for their kids this holiday season for 99 cents. The interactive storybook app is also available for Xmas gift-giving by Windows 8 parents, but they'll pay $4.99 for a version that lacks the features available in the $0.99 iOS version. Which raises some interesting questions: 1. As concerns are being raised over a new Digital Content Divide, is it cool to have owners of the cheapest computers pay 5x the price charged to the most elite consumers, especially for an inferior port of an existing app from the same vendor? 2. Why exactly does a port of an existing app have to be sold at a price which so vastly exceeds that of the original — is it mostly due to economies of scale, difficulties of cross-system app development, or pricing shenanigans?

Submission + - I don't Read Code Anymore - Linus Torvalds

An anonymous reader writes: There is a excellent interview over at the H with Linus Torvalds. Glyn Moody's second interview with Linus since 1998 is both informative and revealing. Linus response to his role as the kernel maintainer has this interesting tidbit: "Well, the big thing is I don't read code any more... when it comes to the major subsystem maintainers, I trust them because I've been working with them for 5, 10, 15 years, so I don't even look at the code." The interview goes on to talk about Amazon, Google, phones tablets and the cloud. Further on the topic of coding, the interview ends with Linus stating: "When I was twenty I liked doing device drivers. If I never have to do a single device driver in my life again, I will be happy. Some kind of headaches I can do without." Like all of us, Linus is getting older and taking a less hands on approach to the development of the kernel. Of course this is understandable. Even the great Git himself is a slave to the passage of time, but thankfully for us, his creation is not.

Submission + - Ada 2012 Language Approved as Standard by ISO (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: The Ada Resource Association (ARA) announced that the Ada 2012 programming language has been approved and published as a standard by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Announcing the development, ARA and Ada-Europe said that the new version brings with it the concept of contract-based programming, Concurrency and Multicore Support, Increased Expressiveness and Container Enhancements. Under the contract-based programming, developers will have the “ability to specify preconditions and postconditions for subprograms, and invariants for private (encapsulated) types.”
Earth

Submission + - SPAM: The roundest objects ever built by hand 2

An anonymous reader writes: The most perfectly spherical object ever made by hand IS only the size of a ping pong ball, but its surfaces are so smooth that were it blown up to the size of Earth, the tallest mountain would be only eight feet high. It’s one of four spheres that are current floating in Gravity Probe B, which is possibly the coolest piece of space engineering evah. Gravity Probe B is an audacious attempt by NASA and Stanford to confirm Einsteinian physics by measuring, with utterly berserk precision, how much Earth’s enormous mass curves space-time around it.
Link to Original Source
Security

Submission + - Is your antivirus made by the Chinese gov't? (the-diplomat.com)

guanxi writes: Huawei, a large Chinese telecom and IT company with close ties to the Chinese military has faced obstacles doing business in other countries, because governments are concerned about giving Huawei access to critical infrastructure. That hasn't stopped them completely, though. Huawei Symantec is a joint venture with one of the world's largest IT security companies which sells security products in the U.S. And the Chinese government is not alone. Would the Chinese or other governments take the opportunity to create back doors into western IT networks? Wouldn't they be crazy not to?

Submission + - MMCC/GW - A scandal too big for these words

capnkr writes: It’s in fact a conspiracy of many of the world’s leading global warming scientists that involves massaging data, dodging scrutiny, hounding out sceptical editors, fudging figures, the possibly criminal destruction of data under FOI request, tax avoidance, gloating over a sceptic’s death, character assassination of sceptics. admissions of using “tricks” to “hide” inconvenient trends, farming grants, private admissions of grave doubts in their own public warming warnings, close collusion with green groups, the joint concocting of the most alarmist announcements and much more. 'Hackers' (some are proposing whistle-blowers) leak emails from leading MMCC/GW scientists which seem to show massive collusion to defraud and disinform about the 'data' behind man-made climate change/global warming...
Linux Business

Submission + - Red Hat @SCO Bankruptcy - Tells SCO "Not so fa 1

capnkr writes: Red Hat Linux takes aggressive action against sue-happy SCO in their bankruptcy proceedings. Over at Groklaw, PJ writes:

"Red Hat is letting the court know that it cares about its litigation, it intends to vigorously pursue it as soon as the bankruptcy stay is lifted, and its claim should not be thrown off a cliff without giving Red Hat notice and an opportunity to be heard."

It seems that SCO wants what has been (for them) a very favorable judge to just take care of the matter of that pesky Red Hat litigation they began oh-so long ago...

It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - If McD's = MS of food, then "Chinese food" (ted.com)

capnkr writes: From the "Submissions Which Aren't Top 10 Lists" department:

Who among geekdom hasn't resorted to snarfing down some take-out Chinese food when in a late night coding frenzy? Over at TED, "Reporter Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the origins of familiar Chinese-American dishes — exploring the hidden spots where these two cultures have (so tastily) combined to form a new cuisine."

Late in her talk she makes the point that Chinese food is arguably a form of worldwide Open Source cuisine. Maybe we can have our GNU, and eat it to...

(And while you're there at TED, for more geeky goodness, check out Richard Prestons amazing discussion of the giant trees of the PNW.)

Feed Techdirt: Time For Another Technology Moral Panic? Digital Drugs! Be Afraid! (techdirt.com)

USA Today got us talking about the concept of technology moral panics with their fear mongering article about predators using game consoles -- and now it's back with a big warning about "digital drugs" in a column by Kim Komando. It's actually just an article about binaural beats, which are hardly new. And, yes, there are those who believe that there are certain binaural beats that can have an effect like drugs, though there are many who believe the impact is mostly self-created.

However, while the article briefly points out that some are skeptical, it immediately moves on to suggest that even so, binaural beats are somehow dangerous as a sort of gateway drug, claiming that they "encourage drug use." Of course, the article doesn't present any evidence of that -- and you could just as easily argue the opposite: that they offer a non-chemical way for people to experience other states of consciousness (if it works, that is). If Komando believes that this somehow encourages drug use, then does she also believe that meditation is encouraging drug use? After all, doesn't that also push people to experience other states of consciousness?

But, of course, when it comes to creating a technology moral panic, all you need is a bunch of scary sounding claims in a major newspaper... and then you just wait for politicians to take over. How long until someone somewhere proposes banning these dangerous sounds?

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Government

Submission + - Russia is attacking Georgia (cnn.com)

c0d3r writes: "CNN is reporting that Russia is now attacking Georgia. Per TFA: "Georgia's president said Friday that his country is under attack by Russian tanks and warplanes, and he accused Russia of targeting civilians as tensions over the breakaway Georgian region of South Ossetia appeared to boil over into full-blown conflict." Reminds me of the movie Red Dawn, which was filmed in my home town of Las Vegas, NM in the Southwest."
The Internet

Submission + - GoDaddy DNS Migration Silliness

An anonymous reader writes: We wanted to consolidate our and our clients' domains with one registrar and after a review we chose GoDaddy for their very slick and comprehensive DNS manager control panel. After we pulled the trigger and moved a small batch of domains over to get started, we discovered that you can't populate the GoDaddy nameservers with A, CNAME and other records unless and until the GoDaddy nameservers are authoritative for the domain in question. In other words, GoDaddy forces you to light up your domains with a blank zone file, which for a pre-existing domain means there will be downtime. Not great when you have a bundle of A and MX records for a group of production mailservers sitting in a non-GoDaddy colo. Numerous calls to GoDaddy support and an escalation to GoDaddy's "ATS" (Advanced Technical Support) yielded the repeated "That's the way it works; no one else has ever complained about this before." Any other Slashdotters think this is as embarrassingly silly as we do? And who else is there who offers reliable domain registrar services and a great DNS manager control panel (where we can pre-populate zone files of course)? TIA!
Linux Business

Submission + - SPAM: Group to push "defensive" patent pubs for

Death Metal Maniac writes: "A tech vendor-backed company that buys up patents in an effort to protect the Linux community from intellectual property litigation will soon launch a Web site to help inventors file defensive publications — documents that make details of an invention public, preventing others from later making patent claims on it."
Link to Original Source
Biotech

Submission + - SPAM: new technology in footwear

metaliar writes: "MBT stands for Masai Barefoot Technology and the footwear are designed to copy walking on a beach in the sand. It's a multiple layered, curved sole that obtains this by creating a natural, but uneven walking surface. This Masai technology is meant to make the core strengthening muscles more active, producing better posture, better back strength and increasing shock absorption for all of the joints. It also makes wearing these walking footwear quite a unique experience to say the least, and quite a workout."
Link to Original Source

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