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Submission + - Sourceforge hijacks GIMP For Windows project, adds malware to downloads (google.com)

David Gerard writes: SourceForge has taken over control of the GIMP for Windows SF project and is now distributing an adware/malwared installer for GIMP. They also locked out the maintainer, Jernej Simoni. Sourceforge claims it was "abandoned" and they're providing a service by "mirroring" the original, though it's unclear how much value malware adds for the end user, rather than for SF. (This comes two years after SF claiming its malware was just "misunderstood".) Since being busted, SF is now serving an .exe that matches that at the official download site. Other projects recently hijacked by SF include many Apache projects (Allura, Derby, Directory Studio, the Apache HTTP server, Hadoop, OpenOffice, Solr, and Subversion); Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird, and FireFTP; Evolution and Open-Xchange; Drupal and WordPress; Eclipse, Aptana, Komodo, MonoDevelop, and NetBeans; VLC, Audacious, Banshee.fm, Helix, and Tomahawk media players; and many others.

Submission + - Mt Gox hacked. All coins gone. (wired.com)

ch0ad writes: Mt. Gox, once the world’s largest bitcoin exchange, has gone offline, apparently after losing hundreds of millions of dollars due to a years-long hacking effort that went unnoticed by the company.

The hacking attack is detailed in a leaked “crisis strategy draft” plan, apparently created by Gox and published Monday by Ryan Selkis, a bitcoin entrepreneur and blogger (see below). According to the document, the exchange is insolvent after losing 744,408 bitcoins — worth about $350 million at Monday’s trading prices.

Piracy

Submission + - Rights Holders See Little Point Creating Legal Content Sources (itnews.com.au) 1

aesoteric writes: Six weeks after Hollywood lost a landmark internet piracy case in Australia, it appears the film studios have gone cold on the idea of helping develop legal avenues to access copyrighted content as a way to combat piracy. Instead, they've produced research to show people will continue pirating even if there are legitimate content sources available. The results appear to support the studio's policy position that legislation is a preferable way of dealing with the issue.
The Internet

Submission + - UN Takeover of Internet Must be Stopped, US Warns (cnet.com) 1

benfrog writes: "In a rare show of bipartisan agreement, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle warned this morning that a United Nations summit in December will lead to a virtual takeover of the Internet if proposals from China, Russia, Iran, and Saudi Arabia are adopted. Called the World Conference on International Telecommunications, the summit would consider proposals including "[using] international mandates to charge certain Web destinations on a 'per-click' basis to fund the build-out of broadband infrastructure across the globe" and allowing ""governments to monitor and restrict content or impose economic costs upon international data flows." Concerns regarding the possible proposals were both aired at a congressional hearing this morning and drafted in a congressional resolution (pdf)."

Submission + - Can QR Codes Save Lives? (itworld.com) 1

itwbennett writes: "Paramedics in Marin County, California, may soon be putting QR codes to lifesaving use. According to an IDG News Service report, 'Lifesquare, a Silicon Valley start-up, has partnered with two emergency response agencies in Marin County to run a year-long pilot program. Lifesquare wants residents to input personal information about their medications into its website, then place corresponding QR code stickers where emergency responders can scan them with an iPhone.' The first hurdle: Getting people to put the sensitive information online. 'The way that we look at is that people already put their information into their driver's license, that's owned by the government, people put their information into credit card company's and that's owned by private corporations,' said Ryan Chamberlain, director of public outreach at Lifesquare."

Submission + - Making a privacy monitor from an old LCD one (hackaday.com) 2

ryzvonusef writes: Instructables Member *Dimovi* utilised a spare LCD monitor and converted it into a “privacy” monitor.

He took apart the monitor’s plastic frame, cutting out the polarised film with a utility knife and removed the film adhesive from the glass panel before reassembling the monitor, which now shines a bright white regardless of what is actually being displayed on the screen.

He then removed the lenses from a pair of theatre 3D glasses, and replaced it with the polarised film he had just removed from the monitor.

Now, he is the only one who can see what he is doing on his computer.

IT

Submission + - Why everyone hates the IT department (pcpro.co.uk) 1

Barence writes: "Why are IT staff treated with near universal contempt? PC Pro has investigated why everyone hates the IT department. From cultivating a culture of "them and us", to unrealistic demands from end users and senior management, to the inevitable tension created when employees try and bring their own equipment into the office, PC Pro identifies the key reasons for the lack of respect for IT."
Networking

Submission + - London wires up for 2012 Olympic games (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: While London's massive Olympic park is still very much a frenetic construction site, IT engineers are fine tuning the equipment that will be used to transmit scores, let athletes send e-mail and transmit high-definition video of the Games. The Olympic Games are set to kick off on July 27 next year and will be followed by the Paralympic Games. Test athletic events are already under way, which are being used to evaluate the resiliency of high-speed data networks costing millions of pounds. The Technology Operations Center has been opened in the Canary Wharf financial district.
Spam

Submission + - Advertising Company VP wants Emails to Expire (circleid.com)

Anonymous Coward writes: "Josh Baer, former VP of Datran Media and current CEO of OtherInBox has been floating an idea at the DMA's Email Experience Council and a few other places, and recently got some traction in Ken Magill's Magill Report. What Josh is proposing is to create the technical means by which a Sender can decide when email 'expires' and is automatically removed from a recipient's inbox, either by deletion, or perhaps archiving (in the case of Gmail). This would supposedly help the end-user, by removing marketing offers that are no longer available."
Google

Submission + - Google Apps Bug Lets Allows Free Voice Calls To US (digitizor.com) 2

dkd903 writes: While Google is busy squashing bugs on Chrome, they have also introduced some in Google Apps! Recently there has been a lot of updates by Google Apps team. In the most recent update on Google Apps, they have integrated nearly all the Google services with Google Apps.

However, this one is about a bug in the Google Apps services that actually lets you make free voice calls to the US from some other country. (India in our case)

Submission + - Russia moves to universal ID card (uecard.ru)

prostoalex writes: On January 1st 2012, Russian government will start issuing universal ID cards that will replace current national identification system (Russia has a system of internal passports), medical insurance cards, student IDs, public transport passes, and debit cards. The smart card contains unique personal identifiers and allows for multiple levels of authentication. The Russian government is pushing for local government agencies, transportation providers, banks and retail operators to adopt the government-issued ID to streamline their operations.

Submission + - The effect of illegal downloads on authors (livejournal.com)

martyros writes: An Author's perspective on illegal downloads of their work, with actual numbers. From the article: "It’s going out of print in hardcover because demand for it has dwindled to 10 or so copies a month. This means I will never get a royalty check for this book. By all appearances, nobody wants it anymore. But those appearances are deceiving. According to one download site’s stats, people are downloading SHADOWED SUMMER at a rate of 800 copies a week. When the book first came out, it topped out at 3000+ downloads a week. If even HALF of those people who downloaded my book that week had bought it, I would have hit the New York Times Bestseller list. ...And let me tell you guys the sales figures on SHADOWED SUMMER had a seriously detrimental effect on my career. It took me almost two years to sell another book. I very nearly had to change my name and start over."

Submission + - Microsoft slams Google over HTML5 video decision (networkworld.com) 2

jbrodkin writes: Microsoft is accusing Google of some heavy-handed tactics in the battle over HTML5 video standards. In an attempt at humor, a clearly peeved Microsoft official wrote "An Open Letter from the President of the United States of Google," which likens Google's adoption of WebM instead of H.264 to an attempt to force a new language on the entire world. Internet Explorer 9, of course, supports the H.264 codec, while Google and Mozilla are backing WebM. The hyperlinks in Microsoft's blog post lead readers to data indicating that two-thirds of Web videos are using H.264, with about another 25% using Flash VP6. However, the data, from Encoding.com, was released before the launch of WebM last May. One pundit predicts the battle will lead to yet another "years-long standards format war."

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