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Submission + - Hawkeye Initiative Highlights Sexism in Comic Books with Humor

An anonymous reader writes: For those who haven't seen it yet, The Hawkeye Initiative is a creative project to highlight sexism in comic book art. The concept is simple: take an image of a woman from a comic book and substitute in Hawkeye (or another male character), and notice just how absurd the image (the pose, the costume, the proportions) actually is. A related treatment of sci-fi and fantasy book covers by fantasy author Jim C. Hines takes the bit a step further with photographs of himself attempting to replicate the cover art.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Looking for tech-focused radio

An anonymous reader writes: I'm looking for a radio station (broadcast or internet, but not satellite) that focuses on tech stories, and other things interesting to nerds. Something like a cross between Slashdot and NPR, with the topics of the former, and the in depth reporting of the latter. Any suggestions? Broadcast stations would be for the Boston, MA area, but other readers might also be interested in stations elsewhere.

Submission + - Mass anti-piracy litigation dismissed, no longer w (

Wesociety writes: Evan Stone, one of the main prosecuting attorneys of mass peer-to-peer copyright infringement lawsuits in the United States has been smacked down by a senior Texas judge, who has made it clear that his courtroom will not tolerate these types of cases.

Submission + - Ants build cheapest networks (

schliz writes: When building a network from scratch, Argentine ants tend to connect their nests in the way that, while more inconvenient for individual ants, requires the minimum amount of trail. Researchers studying "supercolonies" of the ants found them building networks that closely resembled the mathematical shortest path — a Steiner tree. They hope to apply their work to self-healing, organic computing networks of self-organising sensors, robots, computers, and autonomous cars.

The Science Credibility Bubble 1747

eldavojohn writes "The real fallout of climategate may have nothing to do with the credibility of climate change. Daniel Henninger thinks it's a bigger problem for the scientific community as a whole and he calls out the real problem as seen through the eyes of a lay person in an opinion piece for the WSJ. Henninger muses, 'I don't think most scientists appreciate what has hit them,' and carries on in that vein, saying, 'This has harsh implications for the credibility of science generally. Hard science, alongside medicine, was one of the few things left accorded automatic stature and respect by most untrained lay persons. But the average person reading accounts of the East Anglia emails will conclude that hard science has become just another faction, as politicized and "messy" as, say, gender studies.' While nothing interesting was found by most scientific journals, he explains that the attacks against scientists in these leaked e-mails for proposing opposite views will recall the reader to the persecution of Galileo. In doing so, it will make the lay person unsure of the credibility of all sciences without fully seeing proof of it, but assuming that infighting exists in them all. Is this a serious risk? Will people even begin to doubt the most rigorous sciences like Mathematics and Physics?"

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