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Submission + - "Nothing Left to Prove" on The Linux Deskt (cnet.com)

blitzkrieg3 writes: Matt Asay likes the latest Fedora release, especially when it comes to the desktop. From the article:

This is the state of "desktop" Linux today: it really has nothing left to prove. It took years to become user friendly, but it has arrived, helped along by the world's move to browser-based computing. At this point, the only thing that Fedora and the other Linux distributions can do is embrace and extend the Windows or Mac computing experience, because they've largely matched them (especially Windows).

I'm impressed with the work on xrandr and HAL, particularly with regard to input properties. Devices can now be hotplugged without major issues, and most new distros are having users delete their xorg.conf.

Transportation

Submission + - General Motors Snubs Battery Exchange Model (nytimes.com)

blitzkrieg3 writes: Better Place, the electric vehicle company that partnered with Israel, Denmark, San Fransisco, Austraila, and recently Hawaii to install electric vehicle grids, is also working with automakers Renault and Nissan to produce electric vehicles that will accept their standardized batteries. General Motors was also asked to participate, but declined. Thomas L. Friedman argues it's because of such short-signed decisions and general lack of innovation that the big three are having to ask Congress for $15 billion. The business model that Better Place is pioneering has the potential to revolutionize the auto industry as we know it, possibly killing the gasoline car in the process. Did GM make a mistake by not becoming a partner?
Google

Submission + - Google - perhaps doing some evil? (nytimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google, a company known for its "do no evil" policy, is raising the price of their day care services for their employees, from $1,425 a month to almost $2,500 while insisting that they were planning it all along. Of course, they also neglected to tell this to people applying for jobs, and in fact, they have removed day care from their list of benefits. Apparently, Google suddenly realized they were providing a huge subsidy with day care and had a two-year waiting list for day care. They decided the best way to solve both issues was to open a more expensive day care center, then convert the existing one into the more expensive option, allowing only the wealthier Googlers to utilize it. "At a T.G.I.F. in June, the Google co-founder Sergey Brin said he had no sympathy for the parents [who couldn't afford day care], and that he was tired of "Googlers" who felt entitled to perks like "bottled water and M&Ms," according to several people in the meeting."

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