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Comment Re:blacklist from the HB1 system! (Score 1) 167

Where would we get our indentured servants?

According to Trump, 96 million Americans are out of work and need jobs. Start with them. You might have to wait for the child labor and retirement laws are repealed to force the youngest and oldest to work. Should have plenty of people in between those two age groups.

Comment Re:If Edge is as good as MS says it is... (Score 1) 197

I've given it a couple of chances. It's a substandard piece of software. It just doesn't work very well. There's a reason that despite all of MS's efforts to promote it, including fucking with people who use Chrome, it's still used by an incredibly small minority of Win10 users. That's because it's just fucking awful.

Comment Re:Try focusing on your real competitors (Score 1) 197

It says something about far Microsoft has fallen that not even leveraging their power over the operating system can get them any penetration with their built-in browser. I'd say they have not only lost the browser war, they're no longer in the same browser universe. Part of it has to do with the fact that Edge is truly a horrible piece of software, and part of it is that Google has basically colonized Windows with Chrome.

Comment Re: Non Issue (Score 4, Informative) 197

As much as I dislike systemd, it's hardly the same thing at all. IE and Edge are applications that should be no more or less embedded than any other application. Systemd is a system-level component/utility. The equivalent would be demanding that Microsoft take out, say, the event logging system.

Comment Re:Distances (Score 1) 108

Technically you can scale Hyperloop to several times higher speeds, if you can build sufficiently straight segments (e.g. Great Plains). It does however require one alteration of note: you have to increase your leak compensation pumping capacity severalfold (it's an unknown at this point how bad leaks will be, though they tried to be pessimistic in their assumptions), while injecting hydrogen or helium to maintain the same pressure. Ideally hydrogen (it's not explosive nor embrittling at such tiny pressures, although its behavior when compressed would need to be studied). You need light gases to raise the speed of sound inside the tube (also reduces air resistance / compressor mass throughput requirements). Water would work also instead of hydrogen or helium (it's a gas at those pressures), although not as well (but better than air).

At least, pessimistically it's required. I don't think they've done anything to simulate what sort of temperature the rarified gas inside the tube would maintain under full load (the effect of passing vehicles on the tube itself is trivial - the gas is a terrible conductor of heat, and the tube has a huge convecting surface area). If the rarified gas was left significantly hotter than the tube (due to its poor conduction of heat), that too would raise its speed of sound.

Comment Re:Hey, I have a tangential question . . . (Score 1) 293

I wonder if fracking will bring enough money into the region to pay for the damages which will be caused by the major earthquake which is now foreseeably coming their way?

LOL no. Oklahomans seem to think they're in the business of exporting energy. No. They're in the business of importing environmental devastation from other states who want energy without destroying their own homes. So thanks, Oklahoma! Enjoy the money while it's still medically safe for your kids to play outside, but understand that the rest of us have no plans to help you clean up the mess afterward. After all, that's what we paid you for. Best of luck!

Comment Re: Distances (Score 1) 108

Same solution Japan uses for high speed rail. You're in a tunnel. Now you're out and instantly on a bridge! Now you're off and instantly in a tunnel! Now a bridge! Tunnel! Bridge! Tunnel! Bridge! (repeat until you arrive at your destination)

That said, tunnel costs are proportional to diameter and bridge costs proportional to peak loading, so a Hyperloop-style system wouldn't be such a bad idea in such an environment.

Comment Re:Distances (Score 1) 108

A more detailed breakdown of the differences versus high speed rail in general is in this post.

As for versus maglev: maglev is even more expensive to construct than conventional high speed rail, and suffers from the same design challenges that Hyperloop is designed to eliminate. Beyond that, Hyperloop is entirely self-powering - it uses so little power (coasting the vast majority of the time) that it's easy to have enough solar panels atop the tube to provide for its energy needs. Anything not in a rarified atmosphere moving at those sorts of speeds is plowing against a large amount of air resistance.

The small size of Hyperloop cars is a feature, not a bug; it's not just the cross section that's kept down, but the length as well. By keeping cars small (but frequently launched for equivalent throughput), they minimize peak loadings. Viaduct costs are roughly proportional to peak loadings. Elevation allows them to reduce a huge amount of overhead costs (the majority of the costs of a typical rail project) and eliminates a lot of the technical challenges with HSR involving ground shifting and earthquakes, transferring all of your support to readily adjustable fixed points.

As for passenger comfort, the interior looks more comfortable than any train I've ever been on. Of course, you can't get up and walk around, but then again, trips are so short there's not really any need to. I would say that the excellent leg room would be great for stretching out for napping, but that would be a very short nap ;)

As for loading, multiple capsules are loaded up at once. It's not a one-at-a-time thing.

Comment Re:Distances (Score 2) 108

What is so difficult for you about reading the design document, "dumbass"? Did you really think that that isn't covered? Section "Earthquakes and Expansion Joints". The tube is not firmly affixed to each pylon; it's mounted on a multiaxis damper. Its positioning is automatically controlled relative to independent factors, including earthquakes, ground shifting over time, and daily thermal expansion (which results in planned for anticipated changes in bend radii as well as a net overall expansion or contraction at the endpoints)

What it is about some topics that convince people to go online and write rants without having read the design document? It's not that long, for crying out loud. It's one thing to disagree with a particular engineering decision. It's an entirely different thing to have no clue what the engineering decisions are but still rant anyway.

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