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Submission + - Amazon Proposes Dedicated Airspace For Drones (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Amazon has published two new position papers which lay out its vision for future drone regulation. Under Amazon's plan, altitudes under 200ft would be reserved for basic hobbyist drones and those used for things like videography and inspection. Altitudes between 200ft and 400ft would be designated for "well-equipped vehicles" capable of operating autonomously out of line of sight. They would need sophisticated GPS tracking, a stable data uplink, communications capabilities with other drones, and sensors to avoid collisions. This, of course, is where Amazon would want to operate its drone delivery fleet. From 400ft to 500ft would be a no-fly zone buffer between the drone airspace and integrated airspace. Amazon's plan also makes room for "predefined low-risk areas," where hobbyists and other low-tech drones can fly higher than the 200ft ceiling. "Additionally, it is Amazon's view that air traffic management operations should follow a 'managed by exception' approach. This means operators are always aware of what the fleet is doing, yet they only intervene in significant off-nominal cases."

Submission + - Two Years Later, White House Responds To 'Pardon Edward Snowden' Petition (whitehouse.gov)

An anonymous reader writes: In June of 2013, a petition was posted to Whitehouse.gov demanding that Edward Snowden receive a full pardon for his leaks about the NSA and U.S. surveillance practices. The petition swiftly passed 100,000 signatures — the point at which the White House said it would respond to such petitions. For two years, the administration was silent, but now they've finally responded. In short: No, Edward Snowden won't be receiving a pardon. Lisa Monaco, the President's Advisor on Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, said, "Mr. Snowden's dangerous decision to steal and disclose classified information had severe consequences for the security of our country and the people who work day in and day out to protect it. If he felt his actions were consistent with civil disobedience, then he should do what those who have taken issue with their own government do: Challenge it, speak out, engage in a constructive act of protest, and — importantly — accept the consequences of his actions. He should come home to the United States, and be judged by a jury of his peers — not hide behind the cover of an authoritarian regime. Right now, he's running away from the consequences of his actions."

Submission + - Dice announces plans to sell Slashdot Media (arstechnica.com)

cjm571 writes: DHI Group—formerly known as Dice Holdings Incorporated prior to this April—announced plans this morning to sell the combination of Slashdot and SourceForge. The announcement was made as part of DHI’s 2Q15 financial results.

Submission + - FTC now in the business of designing iPads? (wsj.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In a case of regulatory overreach the Federal Trade Commission approved a $32.5 million settlement with Apple in a case that the dissenting commissioner, Joshua Wright, says boils down to this question: "Do you really want a regulatory agency designing your iPad?"

Mr. Wright's fellow commissioners pursued Apple over what they decided was poor design of the iPad. The case arose when some parents complained that their children had ordered virtual goods, such as digital currencies within game apps, without their consent. Like many other online services, Apple's iTunes store does not make users retype passwords every time they want to make a purchase. Once a password is entered, purchases can be made for 15 minutes without having to sign in again.

Networking

Submission + - Paul Baran, packet switching inventor, dies (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Paul Baran, whose Cold War era invention of packet switching technology helped to lay the foundation for the Internet, has died at the age of 84. A native of Poland whose family moved to Philadelphia when he was a youngster, Baran developed his concept of a survivable store-and-forward communications network while at RAND Corp.in the midst of the Cuban Missile Crisis. That concept of packet switching, a digital communications method involving the movement of data divvied up into what Baran called "message blocks" over shared and distributed networks, later found its way into the ARPANET, which evolved into the Internet.
Image

Measuring the Speed of Light With Valentine's Day Chocolate Screenshot-sm 126

Cytotoxic writes "What to do with all of those leftover Valentine's Day chocolates? — a common problem for the Slashdot crowd. The folks over at Wired magazine have an answer for you in a nice article showing how to measure the speed of light with a microwave and some chocolate. A simple yet surprisingly accurate method that can be used to introduce the scientific method to children and others in need of a scientific education."
The Almighty Buck

Harvard Says Computers Don't Save Hospitals Money 398

Lucas123 writes "Researchers at Harvard Medical School pored over survey data from more than 4,000 'wired' hospitals and determined that computerization of those facilities not only didn't save them a dime, but the technology didn't improve administrative efficiency either. The study also showed most of the IT systems were aimed at improving efficiency for hospital management — not doctors, nurses, and medical technicians. 'For 45 years or so, people have been claiming computers are going to save vast amounts of money and that the payoff was just around the corner. So the first thing we need to do is stop claiming things there's no evidence for. It's based on vaporware and [hasn't been] shown to exist or shown to be true,' said Dr. David Himmelstein, the study's lead author."

Submission + - Harvard: Computers Don't Save Hospitals Money (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: Researchers at Harvard Medical School pored over survey data from more than 4,000 "wired" hospitals and determined that computerization of those facilities not only didn't save them a dime, but the technology didn't improve administrative efficiency. The study also showed most of the IT systems were aimed improving efficiency for hospital management not doctors, nurses and medical technicians. "For 45 years or so, people have been claiming computers are going to save vast amounts of money and that the payoff was just around the corner. So the first thing we need to do is stop claiming things there's no evidence for. It's based on vaporware and [hasn't been] shown to exist or shown to be true," said Dr. David Himmelstein, the study's lead author.

Submission + - Google Patent Reveals New Data Center Innovations (datacenterknowledge.com)

miller60 writes: Google is seeking to patent a system that provides precision cooling inside racks of servers, automatically adjusting to temperature changes while reducing the energy required to run chillers. The cooling design uses an adjustable piping system featuring "air wands" that provide small amounts of cold air to components within a server tray. The cooling design, which could help Google reduce the power bill for its servers, reinforces Google’s focus on data center innovation as a competitive advantage. Check out the patent application and a diagram of the system.
Education

Submission + - Teaching Girls to Tinker (edweek.org)

azadrozny writes: Recently girls have been gaining ground and are now surpassing boys in almost all areas of academic achievement. Given this, why are girls still not choosing to pursue degrees in engineering and computer science? One possible explanation is that girls are not being taught to tinker. The author writes, "Boys see computers as toys interesting in their own right, while girls see them as tools for accomplishing tasks. By approaching computers and other mechanical devices as toys, boys are able to learn how they function from the inside out. ... When tinkering with machines, they develop their mechanical reasoning, an arena of cognitive skill that boasts one of the largest of all gender gaps." Teaching girls to how tinker at a young age will provide them the critical skills necessary to enter these fields.
Medicine

Submission + - Stephen Hawking Is Hospitalized

McGruber writes: The Wall Street Journal is reporting (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124024051155535173.html) that Stephen Hawking, age 67, has been rushed to a hospital and is seriously ill.
Windows

Windows 7 To Be "Thoroughly" Tested For Antitrust Compliance 364

CWmike writes "Technical advisers to the antitrust regulators who monitor Microsoft's compliance with the 2002 antitrust settlement will test Windows 7 'more thoroughly' than earlier versions of the operating system were tested, according to a new status report filed with the federal judge watching over the company. Microsoft is also facing renewed scrutiny from the EU, which two weeks ago filed preliminary charges against the company over bundling IE with Windows, and said more recently that Microsoft 'shields' IE from competition."

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