Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Science

Submission + - Leonardo da Vinci: How accurate were his anatomy drawings? (bbc.co.uk)

antdude writes: "BBC News, with a 2.5 minutes embedded video, answers how accurate were Leonardo da Vinci's anatomy drawings — "During his lifetime, Leonardo made thousands of pages of notes and drawings on the human body.

He wanted to understand how the body was composed and how it worked. But at his death in 1519, his great treatise on the body was incomplete and his scientific papers were unpublished.

Based on what survives, clinical anatomists believe that Leonardo's anatomical work was hundreds of years ahead of its time, and in some respects it can still help us understand the body today.

So how do these drawings, sketched more than 500 years ago, compare to what digital imaging technology can tell us today? ..."

Seen on Neatorama."

Movies

Submission + - Roger Ebert: The Essential Man (esquire.com)

antdude writes: Boing Boing shares a seven pages Esquire article (one print page) on Roger Ebert's recent degrading health life, but with strong spirits — "It has been nearly four years since Roger Ebert lost his lower jaw and his ability to speak. Now television's most famous movie critic is rarely seen and never heard, but his words have never stopped..."

Submission + - Sitting down too long is bad even if you exercise. (google.com)

Ant writes: "The Register and many more sources on Google News report that sitting down too long, even with exercises, is bad — "Swedish scientists have warned that too much sitting on your backside can provoke cancer, diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

That's pretty obvious, you might think, but the researchers from the Karolinska Institute and the Swedish School of Sport and Health warn that the excessively sedentary are running serious risks, irrespective of how much exercise they do when they're not plonked behind a desk, or lying on the sofa...""

Science

Submission + - How Long Could Luke Skywalker or Anyone Survive in (wolfgnards.com)

Ant writes: "This Wolf Gnards asks "How Long Could Luke Survive in a Tauntaun?" and answers with:

"All good Jedi know that the best way to survive a snow storm is in the snugly belly of your nearest Tauntaun. Just cut open with your handy dandy light saber, a single horizontal slice across the midsection will do, push squirming intestines aside, and crawl right in. Warm as it is comfortable, the intestines mold to your body like a memory foam mattress. But how long could you survive in a Tauntaun?

Realistically, the sub-zero environment of Hoth is no place to be, Tauntaun or not. And it's important to remember that Luke Skywalker didn't need to survive in his Tauntaun over night, he simply needed a warm place to be until Han had time to build a proper shelter. So, the better question might be, how long did Han have to build a snow shelter until Luke was in serious trouble."

Seen on Boing Boing."

Medicine

Submission + - Why Doesn’t Exercise Lead to Weight Loss? (nytimes.com) 2

antdude writes: New York Times' Well blog reports that "for some time, researchers have been finding that people who exercise don't necessarily lose weight.

A study published online in September 2009 in The British Journal of Sports Medicine was the latest to report apparently disappointing slimming results. In the study, 58 obese people completed 12 weeks of supervised aerobic training without changing their diets. The group lost an average of a little more than seven pounds, and many lost barely half that. How can that be? Exercise, it seems, should make you thin. Activity burns calories. No one doubts that..."

Seen on Blue's News.

Submission + - Milk drinking started around 7,500 years ago ... (eurekalert.org)

Ant writes: "EurekaAlert! reports that "milk drinking started around 7,500 years ago in central Europe. The ability to digest the milk sugar lactose first evolved in dairy farming communities in central Europe, not in more northern groups as was previously thought, finds a new study led by UCL (University College London) scientists published in the journal PLoS Computational Biology.

The genetic change that enabled early Europeans to drink milk without getting sick has been mapped to dairying farmers who lived around 7,500 years ago in a region between the central Balkans and central Europe. Previously, it was thought that natural selection favoured milk drinkers only in more northern regions because of their greater need for vitamin D in their diet. People living in most parts of the world make vitamin D when sunlight hits the skin, but in northern latitudes there isn't enough sunlight to do this for most of the year...

Seen on Neatorama."

Social Networks

Submission + - The Buddy System: How Medical Data Revealed Secret (wired.com)

antdude writes: "Wired has a three pages article (one full page) on "how medical data revealed secret to health and happiness. A revolution in the science of social networks began with a stash of old papers found in a storeroom in Framingham, Massachusetts (MA). They were the personal records of 5,124 male and female subjects from the Framingham Heart Study. Started in 1948, the ongoing project has revealed many of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including smoking and hypertension.

In 2003, Nicholas Christakis, a social scientist and internist at Harvard, and James Fowler, a political scientist at Unviersity of California, San Diego (UCSD), began searching through the Framingham data. But they didn't care about low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or enlarged left ventricles. Rather, they were drawn to a clerical quirk: The original Framingham researchers noted each participant's close friends, colleagues, and family members...""

Slashdot Top Deals

"Today's robots are very primitive, capable of understanding only a few simple instructions such as 'go left', 'go right', and 'build car'." --John Sladek

Working...