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Submission + - Trump doesn't make Microsoft's CEO nervous (cnn.com)

mykepredko writes: Some CEOs are nervous at the prospect of a 6 a.m. tweet from President-elect Donald Trump, accusing their company of not doing enough to keep jobs in the U.S. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, however, is confident about Microsoft's place as a job creator. "We're a U.S.-based company that operates worldwide and our predominant employment is in the United States," Nadella told CNNTech at the DLD tech conference in Munich on Monday. "We've already created a tremendous amount of high-paying jobs in the U.S."

Considering the issues with Microsoft's past use of H1-B visas, this seems like some misplaced hubris on the part of Mr. Nadella.

Submission + - Kaggle Data Science Bowl Perfect Score Submission (kaggle.com)

karlnyberg writes: In the Data Science Bowl 2017 competition (with $1M in prize money available), Oleg Trott has shown that he can "game" the system and achieve a perfect score using only probes and test scores (not actual solutions to the problem at hand).

And he's good-humored about it, since this is only Stage 1 of the competition, meaning he's no closer to actually winning the $500K for first prize to be awarded at the end of Stage 2.

Submission + - Scientists Turn Docile Mice Into Ruthless Hunters

BenBoy writes: A couple of years ago, a story surfaced about smarter mice: Scientists Create Super-intelligent Mice, Discover They're Also Very Laid Back. Well, implicit challenge accepted! 2017 brings us a report from Cell, via The Scientist:

Neural circuits in the amygdala are responsible for predatory behavior in mice, according to a study published January 12 in Cell. Using optogenetics, a technique that uses light to turn neural circuits on and off, a group of researchers led by neuroscientist Ivan de Araujo of Yale University was able to turn docile mice into ruthless hunters.

Nuclear death-mice are, we assume, right around the corner ...

Submission + - Hackers Lovin' It As McDonald's Site Vulnerable To Phishing Attack

Mickeycaskill writes: McDonalds’ main website is putting customer data including names, addresses, contact details and passwords at risk as a flaw is leaving it vulnerable to phishing attacks, according to Dutch software engineer Tijme Gommers.

A reflected server cross-site-scripting vulnerability means it is possible for hackers to steal and decrypt the passwords and personal information of users who sign up for the McDonald’s newsletter.

Gommers says he tried to contact McDonald’s several times, but decided to ignore the customary 30-day grace period and disclose the vulnerability after failing to receive a reply from the company.

Submission + - Facebook's 2016 EEO-1 Diversity Report Still MIA on MLK Day

theodp writes: EEO-1 reports for 2016 were due to be submitted to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by 9-30-2016. So, it's not too surprising that Microsoft, Apple, and Google have gotten around to posting theirs to company diversity sites, albeit with footnotes urging visitors not to pay much heed to the government-mandated raw numbers and to instead trust the tech company-provided as-seen-in-How-to-Lie-With-Statistics percentages. Move-fast-and-break-things Facebook, on the other hand, is still dragging its feet on disclosing its numbers. For all its talk of making the world more open and transparent, Facebook had to be dragged kicking-and-screaming to the EEO-1 disclosure table. Last year, Facebook didn't see fit to reveal its 2015 EEO-1 report until July 2016 (and oddly did so with a no-copy-and-paste-allowed .png), with a mea culpa for its lack of improved numbers and a $15 million pledge to Mark Zuckerberg-backed Code.org to make U.S. kids more CS-savvy. To be fair to (legally) H-1B visa-dependent Facebook, its Black employees may actually make up a higher percentage of U.S.-born (vs. U.S. payroll-based) Facebook employees than 1.72%, although one doesn't imagine Facebook — or Google or Microsoft or Apple for that matter — will be using that defense and voluntarily disclosing those numbers anytime soon.

Submission + - Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE Edition Beta is available for download now (betanews.com) 1

BrianFagioli writes: So what is new? The KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment is the star of the show — after all, if you do not want KDE, you wouldn't choose this version. The shipping Linux kernel is 4.4.0-53, which is surprisingly outdated. Ubuntu-based operating systems are never known for being bleeding-edge, however.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Distributed file sharing 1

DeathToBill writes: I'm a software engineer, and so also the guy who knows stuff about IT, in a company with five employees. All five are based in different cities on two continents. So far, we've used Dropbox for file sharing. The main drawbacks are the cost (£108 per year per user) for still-limited storage space, not-terribly-good collaborative editing, limited version history and very coarse permissions (top-level folder controls only). I'm looking into other solutions, but am finding it difficult to get a feel for how well different solutions actually work. We really like Google Docs' collaborative editing, but we'd like to still be able to use MS Office as users are familiar with it. As well as documents, spreadsheets and presentations, we also need to be able to share engineering outputs such as CAD drawings, schematics, PCB layouts and so on. Most of our work happens on Windows, but a couple of us (mostly me) switch back and forward to Ubuntu for some jobs, so a Linux client would be very useful (even if Office documents aren't editable there). We need some sort of permission control, preferably reasonably find-grained but easy enough for non-technical people to set permissions. At the moment we're getting by with a few GB, but that's becoming a struggle. Most of our users are usually connected, but offline access is occasionally important. We're currently using hosted services, but are happy to host our own if it makes it better or cheaper. What does Slashdot recommend? Is there something great out there that solves all of these?

Submission + - SPAM: It Can Power a Small Nation. But This Wind Farm in China Is Mostly Idle.

schnell writes: The New York Times reports on a massive wind farm in remote Gansu province that boasts more than 7,000 wind turbines but whose capacity goes more than 60% unused. The wind farm epitomizes China's struggles in its efforts to become a world renewable energy leader: the Chinese economy is slumping, leading to decreased energy demand; the country lacks the infrastructure to haul power from remote wind-producing regions to industrial centers; and government policies continue to favor the domestic coal industry. China has 92,000 wind turbines, more than double the US's capacity, but China generates only 3.3% of its electricity from wind compared to 4.7% in the United States.

Submission + - SPAM: Wyndham Worldwide Portal down for 8.5 hours

Jager Dave writes: Unreported, but experienced first-hand, the Wyndham Worldwide Portal, the cloud interface that runs reservations and availability for probably 75% of their hotel chain (they are the largest hotel chain in the world), was down from approximately noon until 8:30p (EST), leaving a great deal of their properties dark. When contacted, the statement was "We're aware of the issue and are working on a resolution".

No URL, because it was not reported on. Yet.

Submission + - Gambler Phil Ivey Sued For Being Too Good (thefederalist.com) 2

schwit1 writes: “The Borgata alleged that Ivey’s actions, which the casino agreed to in advance, constitute cheating. In fact, they merely constitute a gambler getting a legitimate advantage over the casino. In this age of cozy cooperation between the state and the gaming industry, that’s something that’s just not allowed.”

Submission + - Driverless electric shuttle being tested in downtown Vegas (yahoo.com)

schwit1 writes: There's a new thrill on the streets of downtown Las Vegas, where high- and low-rollers alike are climbing aboard what officials call the first driverless electric shuttle operating on a public U.S. street.

The oval-shaped shuttle began running Tuesday as part of a 10-day pilot program, carrying up to 12 passengers for free along a short stretch of the Fremont Street East entertainment district.

The vehicle has a human attendant and computer monitor, but no steering wheel and no brake pedals. Passengers push a button at a marked stop to board it.

The shuttle uses GPS, electronic curb sensors and other technology, and doesn't require lane lines to make its way.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Are Headphone Cables Designed To Fail Within Weeks Of Purchase? 3

dryriver writes: I'm a heavy headphone user. It doesn't matter what headphones I buy — Sony, Philips, Logitech you name it — the headphones typically fail to work properly within a few weeks of purchase. It is never the headphones/earbuds themselves that fail. It is always the part of the headphone cable where the small wires connect to the almost indestructible 3.5mm metal headphone jack. Result? Either the left or right ear audio cuts out and you need new headphones. Putting 1/2 a cent worth of extra rubber/plastic/metal around that part of the cable to strengthen it would likely fix the problem very effectively. The headphones would last for a year or even longer. But almost no manufacturer seems to do this. I keep trying new models and brands, and they all have the same "cable goes bad" problem — earbuds that came with a Sony MP3 player I bought developed the problem within 15 minutes of first use. My question to Slashdot: Do headphone manufacturers do this deliberately? Do they think "We'll sell 40% more headphones each year if the average pair doesn't last beyond 3 months of normal use" and engineer a deliberate weakness into the headphone cable? How can these major brands with all their product engineers not be able to strengthen the most obviously failure-prone part of the headphone cable a bit?

Submission + - SpaceX Returns to flight, nails manding (cnn.com)

Applehu Akbar writes: SpaceX successfully launched a 10-satellite Iridium Next package, and then landed on a drone ship — this time from Vandenburg AFB in California. The launch had been delayed several days by this week's record rainfall and flooding.

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