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Music

Submission + - DOJ inquiry on Apple armtwisting music publishers (cnet.com)

wannabgeek writes: According to an article in CNET, DoJ is asking questions on whether Apple sabotaged Amazon's "MP3 Daily Deals". It states that Apple managers had informed the labels that any music included in Amazon's promotion would receive no promotion at iTunes. Of course, this is just a preliminary inquiry and may or may not result filing of charges. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to watch what comes of it and if it helps free'ing up the competition, then it's a win for consumers.

Submission + - Friday, May 28, Science will be 2,595 years old (umd.edu)

Subm writes: Physicist Robert Park points out "On May 28, 585 B.C. the swath of a total solar eclipse passed over the Greek island of Miletus. The early Greek philosopher, Thales of Miletus, alone understood what was happening. The world's first recorded freethinker, Thales rejected all supernatural explanations, and used the occasion to state the first law of science: every observable effect has a physical cause. The 585 B.C. eclipse is now taken to mark the birth of science, and Thales is honored as the father. What troubles would be spared the world if the education of every child began with causality?"

Submission + - Mark Twain to Reveal All After 100 Year Wait

Hugh Pickens writes: "The Independent reports that one of Mark Twain's dying wishes is at last coming true: an extensive, outspoken and revelatory autobiography which he devoted the last decade of his life to writing is finally going to be published one hundred years after his death. Twain, the pen name of Samuel Clemens, left behind 5,000 unedited pages of memoirs when he died in 1910, together with handwritten notes saying that he did not want them to hit bookshops for at least a century but in November the University of California, Berkeley, where the manuscript is in a vault, will release the first volume of Mark Twain's three volume autobiography. Scholars are divided as to why Twain wanted his autobiography kept under wraps for so long with some believing it was because he wanted to talk freely about issues such as religion and politics. Michael Shelden, who this year published "Man in White," an account of Twain's final years, says that some of his privately held views could have hurt his public image. "He had doubts about God, and in the autobiography, he questions the imperial mission of the US in Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines," says Shelden. "He's also critical of [Theodore] Roosevelt, and takes the view that patriotism was the last refuge of the scoundrel. Twain also disliked sending Christian missionaries to Africa. He said they had enough business to be getting on with at home: with lynching going on in the South, he thought they should try to convert the heathens down there." Interesting enough Twain had a cunning plan to beat the early 20th century copyright law with its short copyright terms. Twain planned to republish every one of his works the moment it went out of copyright with one-third more content, hoping that availability of such 'premium' version will make prints based on the out-of-copyright version less desirable on the market."
Media

Scribd Switches To HTML5 177

drfreak writes "This story from OSNews describes Scribd, a site for uploading and reading documents, switching from Flash to HTML5. The major reason for the decision was that HTML5 supports all the major points of the site's previous functionality, so they saw no point in using Flash any more. The big improvement in the rollout is that documents are now first-class citizens of HTML and no longer need to sit in a Flash 'window.'"

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