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Submission + - Anonymous hacker explains his attack on Boston Children's Hospital (huffingtonpost.com)

Okian Warrior writes: Martin Gottesfeld of Anonymous was arrested in connection with the spring/2014 attacks on a number of health care and treatment facilities in the Boston area. The attacks were in response/defense of a patient there named Justina Pelletier.

Gottesfeld now explains why he did what he did, in a statement provided to The Huffington Post.

Submission + - EU court: Linking without permission violates copyright

BarbaraHudson writes: From the "look-but-don't-link dept

Reuters is reporting that Playboy has won a lawsuit against a Netherlands news site for linking to photos without permission.



"It is undisputed that GS Media (which owns GreenStijl)provided the hyperlinks to the files containing the photos for profit and that Sanoma had not authorised the publication of those photos on the internet," the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) said in a statement.

"When hyperlinks are posted for profit, it may be expected that the person who posted such a link should carry out the checks necessary to ensure that the work concerned is not illegally published.

The European Commission, the EU executive, is set next week to propose tougher rules on publishing copyrighted content, including a new exclusive right for news publishers to ask search engines like Google to pay to show snippets of their articles.

Submission + - FBI says foreign hackers penetrated state election systems (yahoo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The FBI has uncovered evidence that foreign hackers penetrated two state election databases in recent weeks, prompting the bureau to warn election officials across the country to take new steps to enhance the security of their computer systems, according to federal and state law enforcement officials.

The FBI warning, contained in a “flash” alert from the FBI’s Cyber Division, a copy of which was obtained by Yahoo News, comes amid heightened concerns among U.S. intelligence officials about the possibility of cyberintrusions, potentially by Russian state-sponsored hackers, aimed at disrupting the November elections.

Submission + - AMD lands 3 large semi-custom SoC orders, expects revenue of $1.5 Billion over n (arstechnica.com)

John Smith writes: AMD announced an expected 15% income gain in Q2 2016 (and even larger ones in Q3 2016) mostly driven by three semi-custom SoC orders. They expect these three to bring in $1.5 billion in revenue over the next 3-4 years.
We know one of them is the new PlayStation from various leaks, but what are the other two? General suspicion seems to be the Nintendo NX and a Xbox refresh. This would among other things suggest that Nintento is going for an SoC design over their previous PowerPC/AMD chips, and that an Xbox refresh is coming soon.
However, whatever these turn out to be we are going to be seeing them soon. According to Ars Technica, "At least one of those three SOC deliveries will begin "ramping" in the second half of this year, with all of those SOCs launching by 2017."

Submission + - Dyson Airblades 'Spread Germs 1,300 Times More Than Paper Towels' (telegraph.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: The Journal of Applied Microbiology published a report claiming Dyson Airblade hand-driers spread 60 times more germs than standard air dryers, and 1,300 times more than standard paper towels. The researchers from University of Westminster conducted their research by dipping their hands in water containing a harmless virus. Then, they dried their hands with either a Dyson Airblade, a standard hot-air dryer, or a paper towel. Their research shows the Dyson drier's 430mph blasts of air are capable of spreading viruses up to 3 meters across a bathroom. Typical driers spread viruses up to 75cm (about 2.5ft), and the hand towels 25cm (less than 1ft).

Submission + - Seagate Debuts World's Fastest NVMe SSD With 10GBps Throughput (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Seagate has just unveiled what it is calling "the world's fastest SSD," and the performance differential between it and the next closest competitive offering is significant, if their claims are true. The SSD, which Seagate today announced is in "production-ready" form employs the NVMe protocol to help it achieve breakneck speeds. So just how fast is it? Seagate says that the new SSD is capable of 10GB/sec of throughput when used in 16-lane PCIe slots. Seagate notes that this is 4GB/sec faster than the next fast competing SSD solution. The company is also working on a second, lower-performing variant that works in 8-lane PCIe slots and has a throughput of 6.7GB/sec. Seagate sees the second model as a more cost-effect SSD for businesses that want a high performing SSD, but want to keep costs and power consumption under control. Seagate isn't ready yet to discuss pricing for its blazing fast SSDs, and oddly haven't disclosed a model name either, but it does say that general availability for its customers will open up during the summer.

Submission + - Julian Assange might turn himself in to police on Friday (bbc.co.uk)

peetm writes: Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has said he will turn himself over to UK police on Friday if a UN panel rules he has not been unlawfully detained.

He took refuge in London's Ecuadorian embassy in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden over sexual assault claims.
In 2014 he complained to the UN that he was being "arbitrarily detained" as he could not leave without being arrested.

Submission + - Mozilla Giving $1 Million To Open Source Projects It Relies On (mozilla.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla has been a big part of the open source community for a long time, and their main projects rely heavily on independent open source work. They've now announced the Mozilla Open Source Support program, which aims to give back to the projects they rely on, and to also reward other projects that make the community stronger. Mozilla has allocated $1 million to award to these projects — to start. This appears to be Mozilla's efforts to fix a problem we've become painfully aware over the past year and a half: huge portions of the modern web rely on critical bits of open source software that have minimal resources. The company has already begun to compile a list of the projects they rely on. Hopefully it will inspire other organizations to support the open source software they rely on as well.

Submission + - 2015 Physics Nobel Awarded for Neutrino 'Flip' Discovery

Dave Knott writes: The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has been won by Takaaki Kajita (of the University of Tokyo in Japan) and Arthur McDonald (of Queens University in Canada), for discovering how neutrinos switch between different "flavours".
In the late 1990s, physicists were faced with a mystery: all their Earth-based detectors were picking out far fewer neutrinos than theoretical models predicted — based on how many should be produced by distant nuclear reactions, from our own Sun to far-flung supernovas. In 1998, Prof Kajita's team reported that neutrinos they had caught, bouncing out of collisions in the Earth's atmosphere, had switched identity: they were a different "flavour" from what those collisions must have released. Then in 2001, the group led by Prof McDonald announced that the neutrinos they were detecting in Ontario, which started out in the Sun, had also "flipped" from their expected identity. This discovery of the particle's wobbly identity had crucial implications. It explained why neutrino detections had not matched the predicted quantities — and it meant that the baffling particles must have a mass. This contradicted the Standard Model of particle physics and changed calculations about the nature of the Universe, including its eternal expansion.

Submission + - Europe's highest court just rejected the US's 'safe harbor' agreement (businessinsider.com)

craigtp writes: The European Court of Justice has just ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which lets American companies use a single standard for consumer privacy and data storage in both the US and Europe, is invalid.

The ruling came after Edward Snowden's NSA leaks showed that European data stored by US companies was not safe from surveillance that would be illegal in Europe.

This ruling could have profound effects on all US based companies, not just tech companies, that rely upon the "safe harbor" agreement to allow them to store their European customers' data in the US.

Under this new ruling, they could effectively be forced to store European customers' data in Europe and then have to follow 20 or more different sets of national data privacy regulations.

Submission + - SPAM: Why to Invest in Espadrilles - An Brief Idea

husen13 writes: As awkward as it may feel to pronounce this evolutionary footwear, espadrilles are contrarily comfortable to walk in. If the scorching summer heat is inescapable, a comfortable pair of espadrilles works as the right antidote. These are believed to be originated from Pyrenees Catalonia, as very many centuries ago they were in fashion for the locals and continue to make an excellent choice for the citizenry even now. Subdued or glamorous, these can be worn on a vacation to an exotic beach location or a semi-formal party in the office.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Real Ghost Story: The People I See (hiduth.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Ever since I was ten I have noticed weird things that a normal 10 year old would not notice or see. I was ten when I saw my first spirit. I was visiting my grandmother for the summer, my first summer away from my family.

It was a couple weeks, and one night something weird happened. It was about 10:30 when I went to bed, my grandmother went to go to bed and she always closes my door. I went to sleep in the guest room, around 11 she went to sleep. About at midnight I was sleeping and I got a sense I was being watched. I open my eyes and there was a older gentleman about his late 70’s and, he was wearing a suit like 1800’s clothing nothing like what people were wearing, now this was in 2005 in Astoria, Oregon. I looked at for few seconds. He was standing in my doorway looking down the hall at my grandmothers room. He told me to watch my grandmother she was in danger. I got scared, knew it wasn’t a evil spirit it had a calm sense like he knew her, but I got scared, what 10 year old wouldn’t be scared.

Submission + - Lightning wipes storage disks at Google data center (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A lightning storm in Belgium last Thursday hit Google’s St Ghislain data center causing power loss and damage to disk storage, leaving some customers without access to data. The facility was hit directly by four successive lightning strikes which immediately took down the centre’s operations from Thursday 13th until Monday 17th August, according to Google. Despite the uncontrollable nature of the incident, Google has accepted full responsibility for the blackout and promises to upgrade its data center storage hardware, increasing its resilience against power outages.

Submission + - The Cash Code (blogspot.com)

Freya Mickalson writes: So everybody wants to make money online or own an online business but yet it must be quick and effortless. Like most online money making systems this is exactly what The Cash Code promises to deliver. Once again the system requires no previous marketing experience in fact all that it claims a person needs is the ability to search for something on Google. The product claims a person can start making money as soon as the system has been set up and that can take as little as two hours to complete. Check out here for more http://billhweld.blogspot.com/....

Submission + - European goverment agrees Net Neutrality rules, with exemptions

An anonymous reader writes: The European Union's three main legislative bodies, the European Council, the European Parliment, and the European Commision, have reached an agreement on "Open Internet" rules that establish principles similar to Net Neutrality in the EU. The rules require that all internet traffic and users be treated equally, forbidding paid-for prioritisation of traffic. However, exemptions are permitted for particular "specialised services" where the service is not possible under the open network's normal conditions, provided that the customer using the service pays for the privilege. (The examples given are IPTV, teleconferencing, and telepresence surgery.) Zero-rating — exempting particular data from traffic caps — is also permitted, but will be subject to oversight.

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