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Submission + - Watch out for this convincing Gmail phishing scam that's rifling through users' (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: Gmail users are being warned of a fresh phishing scam that tricks victims into giving up their Google credentials, before scouring their sent messages folder for new victims to pass the malicious email on to.

The attack uses image attachments that masquerade as a PDF file. Once clicked on, users are directed to phishing pages disguised as the Google sign-in page.

The user's Gmail account becomes compromised once they enter their information. After doing so, the attacker rifles through the victim's sent messages folder so that they can browse correspondence they have sent to their contacts, and pass on the scam using familiar subject lines and attachments.

Submission + - Wikipedia celebrates its sixteenth birthday

Andreas Kolbe writes: Wikipedia is celebrating its sixteenth birthday. Since the site was first put online in January 2001, it's become everyone's go-to place for quick info. But people's reliance on Wikipedia has also spawned a new phenomenon: bogus information inserted in Wikipedia spreads all over the world. The Register has documented examples of this – newspapers and academics repeating fake names and alternative histories inserted in Wikipedia, corrupting the historical record. Wikipedia users, above all journalists and academic writers, need to understand the limitations of Wikipedia's anonymous crowdsourcing process and learn how to distinguish trustworthy and untrustworthy information in Wikipedia.

Submission + - SPAM: It Can Power a Small Nation. But This Wind Farm in China Is Mostly Idle.

schnell writes: The New York Times reports on a massive wind farm in remote Gansu province that boasts more than 7,000 wind turbines but whose capacity goes more than 60% unused. The wind farm epitomizes China's struggles in its efforts to become a world renewable energy leader: the Chinese economy is slumping, leading to decreased energy demand; the country lacks the infrastructure to haul power from remote wind-producing regions to industrial centers; and government policies continue to favor the domestic coal industry. China has 92,000 wind turbines, more than double the US's capacity, but China generates only 3.3% of its electricity from wind compared to 4.7% in the United States.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Are Headphone Cables Designed To Fail Within Weeks Of Purchase? 4

dryriver writes: I'm a heavy headphone user. It doesn't matter what headphones I buy — Sony, Philips, Logitech you name it — the headphones typically fail to work properly within a few weeks of purchase. It is never the headphones/earbuds themselves that fail. It is always the part of the headphone cable where the small wires connect to the almost indestructible 3.5mm metal headphone jack. Result? Either the left or right ear audio cuts out and you need new headphones. Putting 1/2 a cent worth of extra rubber/plastic/metal around that part of the cable to strengthen it would likely fix the problem very effectively. The headphones would last for a year or even longer. But almost no manufacturer seems to do this. I keep trying new models and brands, and they all have the same "cable goes bad" problem — earbuds that came with a Sony MP3 player I bought developed the problem within 15 minutes of first use. My question to Slashdot: Do headphone manufacturers do this deliberately? Do they think "We'll sell 40% more headphones each year if the average pair doesn't last beyond 3 months of normal use" and engineer a deliberate weakness into the headphone cable? How can these major brands with all their product engineers not be able to strengthen the most obviously failure-prone part of the headphone cable a bit?
Android

Submission + - Samsung Could Soon Start to Twist Google's Arm

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "For the past three years, Android has experienced a kind of free space expansion but as we enter 2012, it seems the game may be changing. Instead of the old “there’s more than enough room for every Android handset maker to be a winner”, we have a three-horse’s-length leader, Samsung shipping close to 55% of all Android phones, while Motorola and HTC lag behind. "[Samsung] could be in a position to twist Google’s arm," writes Jean-Louis Gassée."If last quarter’s trend continues — if Motorola and HTC lose even more ground — Samsung’s bargaining position will become even stronger." But what is Samsung’s ‘‘bargaining position’’? What could they want? Perhaps more search referral money, earlier access to Android releases, or a share of advertising revenue. Will Google let Samsung gain the upper hand? It's not likely because Motorola is about to become a fully-owned but “independent” Google subsidiary that with 16% of the android market could counterbalance Samsung’s influence to some extent. So what could Samsung do? "Consider the Kindle Fire example: Just like Amazon picked the Android lock, Samsung could grab the Android Open Source code and create its own unlicensed but fully legal smartphone OS and still benefit from a portion of Android apps, or it could build its own app store the way Amazon did," writes Gassée. "Samsung is a tough, determined fighter and won’t let Google dictate its future. The same can be said of Google. This is going to be interesting.""

Submission + - 2012: The end of the world of Web as we know it (blogspot.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Today we may confidently declare that Web (or namely hyperreference) potential is already exhausted, Web applications still cannot reach the level of desktop ones, multimedia progress is not specific to the Web, search does not advance because cannot handle complex queries, XML did not fulfill expectations of its designers, Semantic Web is too expensive and awkward to influence the Web. Is it the time for changes?
Apple

Submission + - Apple's 'store within a store' concept coming to T (edibleapple.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple products at Best Buy are often, if not universally, located at “store within a store” kiosks. The store-within-a-store concept not only helps differentiate and isolate Apple’s products from a saturated marketplace, but also helps Apple influence the manner in which they’re displayed – that’s to say, more elegantly than the competition.

Now in an effort to expand the reach of its retail arm, Apple will reportedly be bringing the “store within a store” approach it pioneered at BestBuy to another nationwide retailer – Target.

Your Rights Online

Submission + - Why Lamar Smith Won't Hear SOPA Critics (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "House Judiciary Chairman Lamar Smith, who has unapologetically excluded tech experts from testifying about SOPA, now explains why: 'The criticism of this bill is completely hypothetical; none of it is based in reality. Not one of the critics was able to point to any language in the bill that would in any way harm the Internet. Their accusations are simply not supported by any facts,' Smith said in a statement."
Science

Submission + - Global Warming is Already Melting the Next Ice Age (vice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Earth has natural cycles of glaciation that we can pin down by looking at the planet's orbital patterns around the sun. The ice goes in, the ice goes out, as the Earth heats and cools naturally. When it comes in, we have an ice age. We've been in a warm period for about 11,000 years now and we should've been due for an ice age in about 1,500 years. We're not because we've trapped too much heat already in our atmosphere for things to cool properly. According to a just-out paper in Nature Geoscience, that next ice age is going to be delayed by tens of thousands of years. This is not actually good news.

Submission + - Free open source alternatives to Adobe CS (robcubbon.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Comparison of Adobe CS software with open source alternatives. Photoshop vs. GIMP, InDesign vs. Scribus and Illustrator vs. Inkscape

For web designers, developers and amateur creative types that work with a lot of graphics and image manipulation, the decision of which software to use is an important one.

Intel

Submission + - Intel Dual-Core Pineview Atom Bumped To 1.8GHz (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: "Although they typically offer excellent battery life, overall performance has been a common complaint among many current netbook users, due in large part to the prevalence of Intel's low-power Atom processor in the space. And that's regardless of whether users are running standard desktop, multimedia or gaming applications. Technology marches on though, especially with the endless resources of Intel's monstrous fabrication technologies, and as such, Intel's netbook processor has been evolving. This article take a breaking look at an evolution of Intel's new Pinetrail Atom platform and the integrated Pineview Atom processor architecture Intel first unveiled last December. However, in the iteration tested—the Pineview-D Aton D525—it has taken on not only another processor core, but also ramped up clock speed to a speedier 1.8GHz. As a result, performance of the platform is increased significantly."

Submission + - h264 permanent royalty moratorium announced. (arstechnica.com) 1

vistapwns writes: MPEG LA has announced that free h264 content (vs. paid h264 content which will still have royalties) will be royalty free forever. With ubiquitous h264 support on mobile devices, personal computers and all other types of media devices, this assures that h264 will remain the de facto standard for video playback for the foreseeable future.

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