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Submission + - Linux-Compatible Video Recorder Recommendations

David Greene writes: I'm looking for a good linux-compatible Handycam-like portable video recording device. The old one I have now does not have Linux support and does not use memory cards (tape only). Will most of today's cameras that use memory cards Just Work? Which cams do Slashdot folks like best when working with Linux?

Submission + - Is kiosk use similar to offshore outsourcing? (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: Elevators once had attendants. When elevator operators were replaced by buttons, did shoppers start using stairs in protest? They didn't, but going to the human cashier at a Safeway or Giant feels like an act of resistance. Automated, self-checkout kiosks are gaining usage. Replacing one cashier with four automated systems has its appeal. But will self-service kiosk technology be as disruptive as offshore outsourcing? It would be useful to know how many jobs were actually lost to offshoring, but there is no comprehensive data “on the number of production and services workers who have lost their jobs as a result of the movement of work outside U.S. borders,” said the Congressional Research Service in a recently updated report about offshoring and its impact on jobs. There may be a similar problem in calculating the impact of self-service kiosks on retail employment.
Education

Submission + - Should public schools be training the next generation of Apple addicts? (boston.com)

v3rgEz writes: "Wellesley Public Schools in Massachusetts is considering making fifth-grade students buy or lease an iPad, as well as educational software to run on it. The claim is that the Apple products can ultimately cut costs, but there's a lot of unanswered questions, ranging from how often rowdy fifth graders will break the screens to whether e-textbooks actually deliver any cost savings (link: http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2010/07/25/the-real-cost-of-college-textbooks/the-faux-value-of-e-textbooks). Does Apple really need the assistance in getting its products into the public’s hands?"
Security

Submission + - Hiding Secret Messages in Skype Silences (net-security.org)

Orome1 writes: "A group of researchers from the Institute of Telecommunications of the Warsaw University of Technology have devised a way to send and receive messages hidden in the data packets used to represent silences during a Skype call. After learning that Skype transmits voice data in 130-byte packets and the silences in 70-byte packets, the researchers came upon the idea of using the latter to conceal the sending and receiving of additional messages."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Developer Divide: 19 Generations Of Computer Programmers (infoworld.com) 2

snydeq writes: From punch cards to JavaScript, computing history owes everything to the generations of develoeprs and engineers who have programmed the machines. 'Each developer generation has a distinctive flavor, often defined by a programming language or technology. They burst out with newborn fervor before settling into a comfortable middle age. They may not be on the top of the pop charts after a few years, but they're often still kicking because software never really dies. These new technologies often group programmers by generation. When programmers enter the job market and learn a language, they often stick with the same syntax for life — or at least as long as they can before having to make a switch. It's not that it's hard to learn a new language; they're all pretty similar underneath. It's just that you can often make more money with the expertise you have, so the generations live on. Here is our guide to some of the more dominant tech generations in computer history, as embodied by the programmers who gave them life.'
Programming

Submission + - C Beats Java As Number One Language (i-programmer.info)

mikejuk writes: Every January it is traditional to compare the state of the languages as indicated by the TIOBE index. So what's up and what's down this year? There have been headlines that C# is the language of the year, but this is based on a new language index. What the TIOBE index shows is that Java is no longer number one as it has been beaten by C — yes C not C++ or even Objective C. TIOBE name Objective C as the language of the year but because it has grown most in popularity but this is mainly because of the growth of iOS — it is hardly used for anything else. No without a doubt the language of the year should be C for deposing Java.

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