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GNOME

GNOME 3.8 Released Featuring New "Classic" Mode 267

Hot on the heels of the Gtk+ 3.8 release comes GNOME 3.8. There are a few general UI improvements, but the highlight for many is the new Classic mode that replaces fallback. Instead of using code based on the old GNOME panel, Classic emulates the feel of GNOME 2 through Shell extensions (just like Linux Mint's Cinnamon interface). From the release notes: "Classic mode is a new feature for those people who prefer a more traditional desktop experience. Built entirely from GNOME 3 technologies, it adds a number of features such as an application menu, a places menu and a window switcher along the bottom of the screen. Each of these features can be used individually or in combination with other GNOME extensions."
Space

Submission + - NASA discovers most distant galaxy in known universe (www.cbc.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: From cbc.ca: "NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes (not to be outdone by the Kepler Space Telescope) have discovered the most distant galaxy identified so far in the universe... the galaxy is 13.3 billion light years away and only a tiny fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Due to the time it takes light to travel through space, the images seen from Earth now show what the galaxy looked like when the universe was just 420 million years old, according to a press statement released from NASA. The newly discovered galaxy (is) named MACS0647-JD"
Education

Submission + - How Free Speech Died on Campus 1

theodp writes: The WSJ catches up with FIRE's Greg Lukianoff and his crusade to expose how universities have become the most authoritarian institutions in America. In Unlearning Liberty, Lukianoff notes that baby-boom Americans who remember the student protests of the 1960s tend to assume that U.S. colleges are still some of the freest places on earth. But that idealized university no longer exists. Today, university bureaucrats suppress debate with anti-harassment policies that function as de facto speech codes. FIRE maintains a database of such policies on its website. What they share, lifelong Democrat Lukianoff says, is a view of 'harassment' so broad and so removed from its legal definition that 'literally every student on campus is already guilty.'
Facebook

Submission + - Facebook denies leak of users' private messages

silentbrad writes: The CBC (among others) reports: "A Facebook spokesperson is denying reports that private messages sent by users on the social networking site have become public. The purported glitch began generating attention Monday after French newspaper Metro reported that private messages dating from 2007 to 2009 had become accessible to friends and acquaintances on their profile pages. Other newspapers across the country began reporting similar incidences, citing reports from the site's users. The issue may be related to Facebook moving to its Timeline layout worldwide. ... The company issued a statement in response, saying: "A small number of users raised concerns after what they believed to be private messages appeared on their timeline. Our engineers investigated these reports and found that the messages were older wall posts that had always been visible on the users' profile pages. Facebook is satisfied that there has been no breach of user privacy." TechCrunch.com wrote that there was no evidence the messages in question had been private, and posted an explanation from a company spokesperson. "Every report we’ve seen, we’ve gone back and checked. We haven’t seen one report that’s been confirmed [of a private message being exposed]. A lot of the confusion is because before 2009 there were no likes and no comments on wall posts. People went back and forth with wall posts instead of having a conversation [in the comments of single wall post.]“
Worms

Submission + - Using lasers, researchers were able to take over the worm's brain (harvard.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: In the quest to understand how the brain turns sensory input into behavior, Harvard scientists have crossed a major threshold. Using precisely targeted lasers, researchers have been able to take over a tiny animal’s brain, instruct it to turn in any direction they wish, and even implant false sensory information, fooling the animal into thinking food was nearby.
Wireless Networking

Submission + - iOS 6 device users report baffling range of Wi-Fi problems (networkworld.com) 1

alphadogg writes: Some number of iPhone and iPad users upgrading to iOS 6 are reporting a range of Wi-Fi problems, as are some iPhone 5 users. The solutions, when there are any, seems as baffling as the problems. The continuing posts at Apple's tech support site and at online forums show users with existing iPhone and iPads frustrated by a flurry of different problems, including a "grayed out" Wi-Fi option, dropped connections, slow connection speeds, and having to connect manually to a Wi-Fi access point. Separately, there are posts by some owners of the new iPhone 5, released last Friday, also about Wi-Fi problems. Confusedly, these are problems that are unrelated to the Wi-Fi glitch last week when iOS 6 was first released.
Iphone

Submission + - Apple responds to iPhone 5 scuffs: Scratches and chips are "normal" (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "In an interesting twist to Scuffgate, Apple’s marketing boss Phil Schiller has admitted that the iPhone 5s susceptibility to scuffing is “normal.” Furthermore, it would seem that Apple is fully aware that the iPhone 5 is easy to scuff — and yet it knowingly proceeded to manufacture (and sell) record breaking numbers of the new device. Phil Schiller’s comments come from an email response to a customer, who had contacted the vice president to ask about some “scuffs, scratches and marks” on the chamfered edge that surrounds the phone. Schiller’s reply, in full: "Any aluminum product may scratch or chip with use, exposing its natural silver color. That is normal."

The problem with this, though, is that properly anodized aluminium doesn't scratch or chip with use — just as the military, who make extensive use of anodized aluminium. Let's not forget that Apple itself anodized most of its smaller iPods, but they didn't scuff as easily as the iPhone 5.

For the first official response from Apple, regarding the scuffing — and the fact that devices are even scuffed straight out of the box — Schiller sounds almost condescending or nonchalant."

Microsoft

Submission + - Intel CEO says Windows 8 is being released too early (techspot.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: During a recent company event in Taiwan, Intel CEO Paul Otellini stated that Microsoft is releasing Windows 8 before it’s fully ready and that improvements still need to be made to the software.
Android

Submission + - Dual Droid TV Stick based on Rockchip RK3066 with 2GB RAM & 16GB Flash (cnx-software.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "Lately, there seems to have been a fair amount of interest for a Rockchip RK3066 mini PC (aka UG802) running Android 4.0, and the first mini PC to feature a dual core processor. I’m often reading people complaining about the lack of RAM on those devices, and some others would rather run most things from flash than an SD card for performance reason.

Dual Droid TV Stick
http://www.indiegogo.com/dualdroidtv
But you might be able to get a more powerful mini PC soon, as deadhp1, a reader of this blog would left lots of feedback about Ug802, have been talking with manufacturer to design an HDMI TV stick based on UG802 platform, but with 2 GB RAM and 16 GB Flash, and the processor would be clocked at 1.6GHz instead of 1.2 GHz. The device is called “Dual Droid TV Stick” with the slogan: “Two brains are better than one”. The specifications would be as follows:

        OS – Android 4.04
        SoC – 1.6Ghz Dual Core Cortex A9 RK3066 SOC with Mali 400MP4 Quad Core GPU
        RAM – 2GB RAM
        Storage – 16GB NAND Flash+ microSD card slot
        Connectivity – Wifi b/g/n with Direct Connect
        Video output – Male HDMI 1.4
        USB – USB 2.0 host port + micro USB port for power

However, for this to happen, manufacturers would need a minimum order of around 1.000 pieces to cover the cost of development and bring the price to an acceptable level, which is why deadhp1 launched a crowd-funding campaign on Indiegogo.com. The first 100 pieces would be sold for $115 and the subsequent sponsors would have to pay $125. You also need to add $10 to $15 for shipping.

It’s still unclear which accessories (cables, power adapter) will be provided with the stick from the Indiegogo page. You should get a pretty good Android experience on this stick, but you may not be able to get a proper Linux port due to Rockchip policies with regards to open source software.

This product is still at the development stage, and it should available sometimes in December 2012."

Security

Submission + - Anonymous Hacks Cambodia Over The Pirate Bay Co-founder's Arrest

An anonymous reader writes: At the start of this month, news broke that The Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm had been arrested in Cambodia, quickly followed by speculation that millions of dollars were exchanged for his capture. Svartholm was deported to Sweden today, and rather coincidentally, the Anonymous hacker collective announced that it had hacked Cambodia’s government sites and leaked over 5,000 documents.

Submission + - Torque 3D to be Released on Github under the MIT license (garagegames.com)

iamnothing writes: "Eric Preisz, CEO of GarageGames announces:
"Eleven years ago, The GarageGames founders did an incredibly innovative thing when they sold a full source game engine for $100. We are excited to continue in their footsteps by announcing that we will be releasing Torque 3D as the best open source game technology in the world. Once again, GarageGames will be changing game development.""

Android

Submission + - Toys R Us unveils Android Tablet "Tabeo" for Kids (cnet.com)

puddingebola writes: Can Toys R Us provide the iPad killer? It's a 7 inch Android tablet running ICS. At least they gave the kids a micro-SD card slot. From the article, "Powered by a 1GHz processor, the multitouch device comes with 4GB of built-in storage but can handle up to 32GB with a micro SDHC card. The device comes with 50 preloaded games, books, and educational apps and offers access to 6,000 more apps through the Tabeo Store."
Your Rights Online

Submission + - Internet Brands sues people for forking under CC by-sa (davidgerard.co.uk)

David Gerard writes: "Internet Brands bought Wikitravel.org in 2006, plastered it with ads and neglected it. After years, the Wikitravel community finally decided to fork under CC by-sa and move to Wikimedia. Internet Brands is now suing two of the unpaid volunteers for wanting to leave. The Wikimedia Foundation is seeking a declaratory judgement that you can actually fork a free-content project without permission. Internet Brands has a track record of scorched-earth litigation tactics."
Technology

Submission + - The Galileo Thermometer was not invented by Galileo (scienceblogs.com)

GregLaden writes: "The object known as the Galileo Thermometer is a vertical glass tube filled with a liquid in which are suspended a number of weighted glass balls. As the temperature of the liquid changes, so does the density. Since each glass ball is set to float at equilibrium in a sightly different density of the liquid, as the temperature increases, each glass ball sinks to the bottom. It turns out that this thermometerc was actually invented by a team of instrument inventors that formed a scientific society who had the impressive motto "Probando e Reprobando," which in English means "testing and retesting." The Accademia del Cimento operated under the leadership of the Grand Duke Ferdinand II from 1657-1667 in Florence, Italy.

According to Peter Loyson, who has written a corrective article for the Journal of Chemical Education, Galilio did invent a temperature measuring device called a thermoscope."

Networking

Copper Thieves Jeopardize US Infrastructure 578

coondoggie supplies an excerpt from Network World that might make you consider a lock for your pipes: "The FBI today ratcheted up the clamor to do something more substantive about the monumental growth of copper theft in the US. In a report issued today the FBI said the rising theft of the metal is threatening the critical infrastructure by targeting electrical substations, cellular towers, telephone land lines, railroads, water wells, construction sites, and vacant homes for lucrative profits. Copper thefts from these targets have increased since 2006; and they are currently disrupting the flow of electricity, telecommunications, transportation, water supply, heating, and security and emergency services, and present a risk to both public safety and national security." (A July, 2006 post on Ethan Zuckerman's blog gives an idea of how widespread cable theft has affected internet infrastructure, and basketmaking, in Africa.)

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