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Submission + - IAEA, Iran begins new nuke talks (

Jetra writes: "With the US checking Iraq and Afghanistan, it seems that Iran wants to join the Atomic Age, testing multipoint explosives to detonate a charge. As always, Iran denies such claims. This could either go one of three ways, Nuclear Annihilation, Atomic Power, or a Cold War between Iran and the Middleeast. Isreal warns that it will destroy all silos unless tensions are eased by other countries such as US, UK, Japan, and Russia."

Submission + - Photographers, you're being replaced by software (

Mrs. Grundy writes: CGI software, even open-source software like Blender, continues to improve in quality, speed and easy-of-use. Photographer Mark Meyer wonders how long it will be before large segments of the photography industry are replaced by software and become the latest casualty to fall to outsourcing. Some imagery once the domain of photographers has already moved to CGI. Is any segment of the photography market safe? Will we soon accept digital renderings in places where we used to expect photographs?

Submission + - Kickstarter leaves project ideas exposed (

netbuzz writes: "“Crowd-funding” startup Kickstarter is taking a public-relations hit today after it was reported that some 70,000 not-yet-public project ideas were left exposed on the company’s Web site for more than two weeks. Kickstarter insists that no financial information was compromised and that only a few dozen of the projects were actually accessed. “Obviously our users' data is incredibly important to us,” the company said in a blog post. “Even though limited information was made accessible through this bug, it is completely unacceptable.”"

Submission + - Publishers SAGE & OUP win copyright case against Georgia State University (

McGruber writes: The Atlanta Journal Constitution ( is reporting that a federal judge has ruled in favor of Georgia State University on 69 of 74 copyright claims filed by Cambridge University Press (, Oxford University Press( and SAGE Publications ( .

In a 350-page ruling, Senior US District Judge Orinda Evans found that "fair use protected a Georgia State University professor's decision to allow students to access an excerpt online through the university's Electronic Reserves System."

While the 69 of the 74 claims were rejected, the judge also found that five violations did occur "when the publisher lost money because a professor had provided free electronic access to selected chapters in textbooks." SAGE Publications ( prevailed on four of these five claims, while Oxford University Press ( won the fifth claim. Cambridge University Press ( lost all its claims.


Submission + - Facebook on collision course with new EU privacy laws (

An anonymous reader writes: Facebook and other US internet companies are faced with a new EU data protection regime, reports, the Christian Science Monitor reports. US concepts of free expression and commerce will battle European support for privacy and state legislation.

Submission + - Researchers feel pressure to cite superfluous papers (

ananyo writes: One in five academics in a variety of social science and business fields say they have been asked to pad their papers with superfluous references in order to get published. The figures, from a survey published in the journal Science (abstract, also suggest that journal editors strategically target junior faculty, who in turn were more willing to acquiesce.
The controversial practice is not new: those studying publication ethics have for many years noted that some editors encourage extra references in order to boost a journal's impact factor (a measure of the average number of citations an article in the journal receives over two years). But the survey is the first to try to quantify what it calls 'coercive citation', and shows that this is “uncomfortably common”. Perhaps the most striking finding of the survey was that although 86% of the respondents said that coercion was inappropriate, and 81% thought it damaged a journal's prestige, 57% said they would add superfluous citations to a paper before submitting it to a journal known to coerce.
However, figures from Thomson Reuters suggest that social-science journals tend to have more self-citations than basic-science journals.


Submission + - Iran Demands (Legal) Retaliation For Stuxnet ( 1

jfruhlinger writes: "The Stuxnet virus is widely believed to have been cooked by U.S. and Israeli intelligence to disable Iran's nuclear program. Now an Iranian official is demanding retribution. But, bad news for fans of apocalyptic wars: The revenge will take the form of legal action against Siemens, which the Iranians believe helped with the attack."

Submission + - Iran Says Siemens Helped US, Israel Build Stuxnet ( 1

CWmike writes: "Iran's Brigadier General, Gholam Reza Jalali, accused Siemens on Saturday with helping U.S. and Israeli teams craft the Stuxnet worm that attacked his country's nuclear facilities. 'Siemens should explain why and how it provided the enemies with the information about the codes of the SCADA software and prepared the ground for a cyber attack against us,' Jalali told the Islamic Republic News Service. Siemens did not reply to a request for comment on Jalali's accusations. Stuxnet, which first came to light in June 2010 but hit Iranian targets in several waves starting the year before, has been extensively analyzed by security researchers. Symantec and Langner Commuications say Stuxnet was designed to infiltrate Iran's nuclear enrichment program, hide in the Iranian SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) control systems that operate its plants, then force gas centrifuge motors to spin at unsafe speeds. Jalali suggested that Iranian officials would pursue Siemens in the courts, and claimed that Iranian researchers traced the attack to Israel and the U.S. He said information from infected systems was sent to computers in Texas."

Submission + - Chrome Shields Websites From DDoS Attacks ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Google has an interesting idea how to take the edge off denial of service attacks. The latest developer builds of Chrome 12 have an option called http throttling which will simply deny a user to access a website once the browser has received error messages from a certain URL. Chrome will react with a "back-off interval" that will increase the time between the requests to a website. If there are enough chrome requests flooding a website under attack, this could give webmasters some room to recover from a nasty DDoS attack.

Submission + - Swedish health board forbids SMS reminder (

An anonymous reader writes: The swedish health board (Socialstyrelsen) decides that the appointment reminder sent out by SMS is breaking patient confidentiality because it is not encrypted. However, they say nothing about the snail mail appointment reminder sent by post card.

Submission + - France Outlaws Hashed Passwords ( 3

An anonymous reader writes: Storing passwords as hashes instead of plain text is now illegal in France, according to a draconian new data retention law. According to the BBC, "[t]he law obliges a range of e-commerce sites, video and music services and webmail providers to keep a host of data on customers. This includes users' full names, postal addresses, telephone numbers and passwords. The data must be handed over to the authorities if demanded." If the law survives a pending legal challenge by Google, Ebay and others, it may well keep some major services out of the country entirely.

Submission + - Katamari Hack for Chrome (and compatible browsers) ( 1

skaet writes: Using CSS3 transforms and HTML5 canvas, the Katamari Hack for Google Chrome (and other compatible browsers) allows you to turn any website into a game of Katamari Damacy! The script was created by Alex Leone, David Nufer, and David Truong, and won the 2011 Yahoo HackU contest at University of Washington. Don't like the new Slashdot design? Go to town on it!

Submission + - Japan Battles Partial Nuclear Meltdown

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Financial Times reports that Japanese nuclear experts are working to contain a partial meltdown at an earthquake-stricken nuclear power plant (reg. may be required) north of Tokyo, as fears grow that the death toll from Friday’s massive quake and tsunami could reach the tens of thousands. A partial meltdown, experts said, would likely mean that some portion of the reactors’ uranium fuel rods had cracked or warped from overheating, releasing radioactive particles into the reactors’ containment vessels. Some of those particles would have escaped into the air outside when engineers vented steam from the vessels to relieve pressure building up inside. Adding to problems at the site, hydrogen was building up inside the Number Three reactor’s outer building, threatening an explosion like the one that blew apart the Number One reactor building’s roof and outer walls on Saturday. However, it remains unclear how far radiation has spread from the facility. Some local residents and health workers were diagnosed with radiation poisoning in precautionary tests, but they show no outward symptoms of distress. "Even if you have a radiation release, although that’s not a good thing, it’s not automatically a harmful thing. It depends on what the level turns out to be," says Steve Kerekes, a spokesman for the Nuclear Energy Institute, a US industry group, adding that a person exposed to the highest radiation levels measured at the Fukushima site would absorb in two to three hours the same amount of radiation that he would normally absorb in 12 months – a significant but not necessarily injurious amount, especially if exposure time was short."

Submission + - Twitter discards client UI community (

Antique Geekmeister writes: Twitter has just decided to discard the community of developers who've created interesting, innovative, and exciting to start-up company applications. The announcement at shows that they intend to switch from the "bazaar" model of development to the "cathedral", with much tighter control of user interfaces for "security" and "consistency".

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egrep patterns are full regular expressions; it uses a fast deterministic algorithm that sometimes needs exponential space. -- unix manuals