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Privacy

British Court Rules Against Blogger Anonymity 238

An anonymous reader writes "In a dangerous judgment for British bloggers and whistleblowers, a British court has ruled (absurdly) that because blogging itself is a public activity, bloggers have 'no reasonable expectation of privacy' regarding their identities, and newspapers are allowed to publish their identities if they can find them by fair or foul means. A British police detective who recently won the Orwell Prize for his excellent political writing used his blog to write highly critical accounts of police activities and unethical behavior, making very powerful enemies in the process. A well-funded newspaper with powerful connections quickly heard of his blog and decided it was absolutely vital to expose his identity using an investigative journalist. Like any good newspaper, the blogger anonymized the people and the locations in all the cases he discussed on his blog, but the newspaper alleges these were not sufficiently anonymized and complains that they could work out the identities, though British newspapers don't complain that they are allowed to publish the identities of men who are falsely accused of rape and cleared in court. The newspaper also helpfully contacted the blogger's employer, and his job is now threatened."
The Internet

Submission + - Congressman Considers Ending Online Advertising

SpicyBrownMustard writes: US Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va.) is contemplating the introduction of legislation that would essentially put an end to online advertising as we know it today, requiring advertisers to allow website users to "opt-in" before seeing any ads that use or create cookies for optimization or targeting purposes. "If Congress is leaning in that direction, it would mark a big shift in sentiment from last year, when some leading policymakers said that ISP-based targeting should require opt-in consent, but that cookie-based targeting requires only opt-out consent." This would result in a catastrophic shift in the only currently viable online economic model, destroying the ability of millions of small independent websites to survive.
Businesses

Submission + - Swedish Koenigsegg is buying Saab (outputlogic.com)

OutputLogic writes: "Amid worldwide economic recession and declining market share, Saab Automobile AB has another shot at survival. Koenigsegg Group AB agreed to a preliminary deal to buy the troubled company from General Motors Corp. Koenigsegg is a little-known Swedish boutique sports-car maker. It has only 45 full time staff empolyees and sold 18 cars last year,which is 97,982 less than SAAB did."
United States

Submission + - CIA invests in open source (goodgearguide.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "The company in charge of providing technology to the U.S. intelligence community has invested in an open-source firm to provide enterprise-search technology to the CIA and other intelligence agencies. In-Q-Tel is investing in Lucid Imagination, which provides support, maintenance, training and add-on software for the Apache Software Foundation's Lucene and Solr search projects. Lucene is an information retrieval library that can be used for full-text indexing and search. Solr is an enterprise-search server based on Lucene."
The Internet

Submission + - Microsoft sues Vancouver family over Click Fraud

dakohli writes: "Microsoft is suing two family based businesses who allegedly committed click fraud in order to wear down their competitors advertising budgets and raise the profile of thei own search results: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2009/06/16/bc-microsoft-cliick-fraud-lawsuit-vancouver.html Microsoft claims they are out 1.5 Million but are suing for $750K. No word on criminal charges yet."
Media

Submission + - British court rules against whistleblower bloggers (timesonline.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: In a dangerous judgment for British bloggers and whistleblowers, a British court has ruled absurdly that simply because blogging itself is a public activity, bloggers have "no reasonable expectation of privacy" regarding their identities, and newspapers are allowed to publish their identities if they can find them by fair or foul means. A British police detective who recently won the Orwell Prize for his excellent political writing used his blog to write highly critical accounts of police activities and unethical behavior, making very powerful enemies in the process. A well-funded newspaper with powerful connections quickly heard of his blog and decided it was absolutely vital to expose his identity using an investigative journalist. Like any good newspaper, the blogger anonymized the people and the locations in all the cases he discussed on his blog, but the newspaper alleges these were not sufficiently anonymized and complains that they could work out the identities, though British newspapers don't complain that they are allowed to publish the identities of men who are falsely accused of rape and cleared in court. The newspaper also helpfully contacted the blogger's employer, and his job is now threatened.
Biotech

Submission + - Monsanto backed bill could outlaw organic farming 1

scubamage writes: Congresswoman Rosa Delauro (D-CT) has introduced legislation which could potentially destroy both small and organic farming as we know it. The bill, HR 875, forces pesticides, herbicides, and any new chemicals developed to be used by all farmers in the name of "food safety and sanitation." It would also seek to outlaw seed banking, enforce mandatory GPS tracking of all livestock, and to create a new governing body to oversee food safety without any oversight. This includes warrantless searches of all food production facilities. Further, it would require such intense record keeping that it could quite literally strangle many small farmers out of business. It is also interesting to note that Ms. Delauro is married to Stanley Greenberg — a political strategist whose clients include none other than Monsanto: the world's largest producer of herbicides, pesticides, and genetically modified food products.

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