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Google

Submission + - Nexus 4 demand crashes Google Play Servers, sold out in 25 minutes. (phonearena.com)

figleaf writes: The must awaited Nexus 4 went on sale for US customers on Nov 13 at 8:36 AM PST. Unfortunately, the launch was anything but smooth. Several eager buyers were unable to procure the coveted device because of various server errors. Many users who were able to add the Nexus 4 to the shopping cart found that they could not complete their transaction. Even the customer service representatives were unable to access the internal servers during the time when the Nexus 4 was on sale. 25 minutes after Nexus 4 went on sale both the 8GB and 16GB versions were sold out.
Google

Submission + - Google says government surveillance growing (informationweek.com)

SternisheFan writes: In a blog post, Google senior policy analyst Dorothy Chou says, " [G]overnment demands for user data have increased steadily since we first launched the Transparency Report." In the first half of 2012, the period covered in the report, Chou says there were 20,938 inquiries from government organizations for information about 34,614 Google-related accounts.

Google has a long history of pushing back against governmental demands for data, going back at least to its refusal to turn over search data to the Department of Justice in 2005.

Many other companies have chosen to cooperate with government requests rather than question or oppose them, but Chou notes that in the past year, companies like Dropbox, LinkedIn, Sonic.net and Twitter have begun making government information requests public, to inform the discussion about Internet freedom and its limits.

According to the report, the U.S. continues to make the most requests for user data, 7,969 in the first six months of the year. Google complied with 90% of these requests. Google's average compliance rate for the 31 countries listed in the report is about 47%.

AMD

Submission + - AMD hires bank to explore sale options (reuters.com)

Dainsanefh writes: Advanced Micro Devices has hired JPMorgan Chase & Co to explore options, which could include a potential sale, as the chipmaker struggles to find a role in an industry increasingly focused on mobile and away from traditional PCs, according to three sources familiar with the situation.
Science

Submission + - New Material Can Store Vast Amounts Of Energy (gizmag.com)

ElectricSteve writes: Using super-high pressures similar to those found deep in the Earth or on a giant planet, researchers from Washington State University (WSU) have created a compact, never-before-seen material capable of storing vast amounts of energy. Described by one of the researchers as “the most condensed form of energy storage outside of nuclear energy,” the material holds potential for creating a new class of energetic materials or fuels, an energy storage device, super-oxidizing materials for destroying chemical and biological agents, and high temperature superconductors.
Security

Submission + - Great way to FireWall cc attack from China (soido.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Westerners living in China are getting used to Connection Rests after bumping into sensitive keywords in Google search results. After that the computer will not be able to open any websites in 1-2 minutes. Many people hate it, but do you know? It also helped people defeat hackers from China

A Chinese blogger blogged about how he helps his friend successfully defended his web space hosted on a HK server with the help of GrFW. The connection limit of their account is 500 and it's constantly suffering from "Service Unavailable". There is nothing unusual in their IP and VP records. But their server log bloated from 22M to 169M in the recent two days.There are 1million requests from 500 unique IP targeting a single asp page. The attacker is flooding the asp page without valid id parameter causing database query errors. He fixed the parameter check flaw. but still the cc attack is overwhelming the server. After their service provider changed their IP, He came up with a brilliant idea. The guy directed all request without valid parameters to to an address ended with a GrFiW approved sensitive keyword. "/?min9hui" (9 should be g).

China GFiW approved keywords are classified and filtered on different levels some are inspected by DPI. Will these key words become migic spell protecting our web from crawler and flooders from China ? God knows. But GrFW indeed helped the Chinese op effectively cooled the flooder down. According to his test, he refreshed the website 20 times both with and without this keyword. With the keyword, only 3 requests appear in server log. while without the keyword 20 request arrived his server, none miss.As a comment in the blog pointed out that this trick only works for cc attack, request flood, but has no effect on DDoS attack with fragmented packets. What about running a t0r relay to win a IP black hole ;)

Submission + - Google News has controversial new look (blogspot.com) 2

dpletche writes: Google News, historically one of the most powerful and versatile news aggregation sources on the internet, has been completely redesigned for customers in the USA. The new site appears to substitute a Facebook-like activity stream for the earlier topic-based sections. It also includes a number of mandatory new sections and comprehensive monitoring of user behavior. Reaction from the user community has been energetic, if not at all positive.

What other alternatives exist for users who aren't satisfied with the new design?

United States

One Year Later, USPS Looks Into Gamefly Complaint 183

Last April, we discussed news that video game rental service GameFly had complained to the USPS that a large quantity of their game discs were broken in transit, accusing the postal service of giving preferential treatment to more traditional DVD rental companies like Netflix. Now, just over a year later, an anonymous reader sends word that the USPS has responded with a detailed inquiry into GameFly's situation (PDF). The inquiry's 46 questions (many of which are multi-part) cover just about everything you could imagine concerning GameFly's distribution methods. Most of them are simple, yet painstaking, in a way only government agencies can manage. Here are a few of them: "What threshold does GameFly consider to be an acceptable loss/theft rate? Please provide the research that determined this rate. ... What is the transportation cost incurred by GameFly to transport its mail from each GameFly distribution center to the postal facility used by that distribution center? ... Please describe the total cost that GameFly would incur if it expanded its distribution network to sixty or one hundred twenty locations. In your answer, please itemize costs separately. ... Does the age of a gaming DVD or the number of times played have more effect on the average life cycle of a gaming DVD?"

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