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Science

Submission + - Possible Test for String Theory (sciencedaily.com) 1

dexmachina writes: A team of theoreticians, led by a group from Imperial College London, has released calculations that show string theory makes specific, testable predictions about the behaviour of quantum entangled particles. Professor Mike Duff, lead author of the study from the Department of Theoretical Physics at Imperial College London commented, "This will not be proof that string theory is the right 'theory of everything' that is being sought by cosmologists and particle physicists. However, it will be very important to theoreticians because it will demonstrate whether or not string theory works, even if its application is in an unexpected and unrelated area of physics." In other words, string theory may finally have shed its critics' most common complaint: unfalsifiability. However, given the second most common complaint, I can't help but wonder: which string theory?
Encryption

Submission + - Government gets more secret, public gets more open (nyteknik.se)

An anonymous reader writes: Today the company Sectra revealed that they will provide the all the chief of state in the European union a headset equipped with the highest possible encryption. This is done in the same time when the installation of public surveillance cameras is skyrocketing. Did you pay your government for this development?

Submission + - World's Fastest Helicopter (ieee.org)

MechEMark writes: An IEEE feature article penned with Sikorsky describes the development process for high-speed helicopters and the current work required in blade/rotor modulation and computer feedback control to achieve flight speeds in excess of the current record of 400 km/h
Science

Submission + - Mobile Medical Lab - The $10 Phone Microscope (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: Aydogan Ozcan of UCLA has developed a microscope attachment for a cell phone – turning the device into a sort of mobile medical lab. It’s both lightweight (~38g or 1.5 oz) and cheap (parts cost around $10). The cellphone microscope can analyze blood and saliva samples for microparticles, red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and water borne parasites. Ozcan and his team have recently won three prestigious awards for the device: a Grand Challenges award from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (worth $100,000), the National Geographic Emerging Explorer award (worth $10,000), and the CAREER award from the National Science Foundation ($400,000). With these funds, Ozcan plans on starting case studies in Africa to see how the microscope can help revolutionize global medicine.

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