Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×
Government

Submission + - Opportunity Cost of Inaction: High-Speed Rail in the United States (apta.com)

McGruber writes: In July, the American Public Transportation Association (www.apta.com/) recently released an informative report "Opportunity Cost of Inaction: High-Speed Rail and High Performance Passenger Rail in the United States" (http://www.apta.com/resources/reportsandpublications/Documents/HPPR-Cost-of-Inaction.pdf).

The report addresses the initial investment and on-going cost of operation and maintenance of high-performance passenger rail in four of the U.S. Federal Railroad Administration-sanctioned regional networks — Northeast, Chicago Hub, California, and Northwest — over a 40-year period.

According to the report, the U.S. Census estimates the population will grow by more than 100 million people in the next 40 years. As the population grows, increased pressure will be placed on the nation’s already crumbling infrastructure. With a complementary high-speed rail service, this will help mitigate the cost of maintenance, replacement and the capacity expansion needs of airport runways, highways and roadways. In many cases expansion will be difficult because of the lack of land mass. I am sure this report will put to rest all the concerns raised during the previous slashdot story, California Going Ahead With Bullet Train (http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/11/27/0245250/california-going-ahead-with-bullet-train)

Science

Submission + - Near-universal Mexican healthcare coverage results from science-informed changes (nature.com) 4

ananyo writes: A revamp of Mexico’s beleaguered health-care system is proving to be a runaway success and offers a model for other nations seeking to reform their own systems, according to a review published this week in The Lancet (abstract). The key to the scheme’s success is the way in which it has modified its reforms in response to scientific assessments of their effectiveness, the authors say.
Launched in a law in 2003, the Mexican scheme was designed to sort out widespread inefficiencies and inconsistencies in the country's health-care system. Some 50 million Mexicans — nearly half the country’s population — who previously were not covered by health insurance are now enrolled, leading the scheme’s architects to claim that the country has near-universal health-care coverage.
As well as the increased coverage, the scheme has seen the number of conditions treated under Mexican public health insurance nearly quintuple. Admittedly, the former health minister Julio Frenk, now dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, is a co-author on the paper.

Botnet

Submission + - Massive Botnet 'Indestructible,' Say Researchers (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "A new and improved botnet that has infected more than four million PCs is 'practically indestructible,' security researchers say. TDL-4, the name for both the bot Trojan that infects machines and the ensuing collection of compromised computers, is 'the most sophisticated threat today,' said Kaspersky Labs researcher Sergey Golovanov in a detailed analysis on Monday. Others agree. 'I wouldn't say it's perfectly indestructible, but it is pretty much indestructible,' Joe Stewart, director of malware research at Dell SecureWorks and an internationally-known botnet expert, told Computerworld on Wednesday. 'It does a very good job of maintaining itself.' Because TDL-4 installs its rootkit on the MBR, it is invisible to both the operating system and more, importantly, security software designed to sniff out malicious code. But that's not TDL-4's secret weapon. What makes the botnet indestructible is the combination of its advanced encryption and the use of a public peer-to-peer (P2P) network for the instructions issued to the malware by command-and-control (C&C) servers. 'The way peer-to-peer is used for TDL-4 will make it extremely hard to take down this botnet,' said Roel Schouwenberg, senior malware researcher at Kaspersky. 'The TDL guys are doing their utmost not to become the next gang to lose their botnet.'"

Slashdot Top Deals

You're not Dave. Who are you?

Working...