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Submission + - Today is 50th anniversary of Star Trek (wikipedia.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Star Trek, a TV series (later named The Original Series or "TOS") debuted in the United States on NBC on September 8, 1966. The show tells the tale of the crew of the starship Enterprise and its five-year mission "to boldly go where no man has gone before."

Submission + - Diphtheria returns to Europe for lack of vaccination

TuringTest writes: A six-year-old child was admitted to a hospital in Barcelona and diagnosed with diphtheria, which didn't occur in Spain since 1986 and was largely unheard of in western Europe. The boy had not been vaccinated despite the vaccine being avaliable in free vaccination programmes

Spanish general health secretary called anti-vaccination campaigns “irresponsible" and said: "The right to vaccination is for children, not for the parents to decide".

The child is in critical condition, though he's now being treated with a serum expressly brought from Russia through an emergency procedure.

Submission + - Wikia and SONY playing licensing mind tricks

TuringTest writes: Popular culture website Wikia originally hosted its user-contributed content under a free, sharealike Commercial Commons license (CC-BY-SA). At least as soon as 2003, some specific wikis decided to use the non-commercial CC-BY-NC license instead: hey, this license supposedly protects the authors, and anyone is free to choose how they want to license their work anyway, right?

However, in late 2012 Wikia added to its License terms of service a retroactive clause for all its non-commercial content, granting Wikia an exclusive right to use this content in commercial contexts, effectively making all CC-BY-NC content dual-licensed. And today, Wikia is publicizing a partnership with Sony to display Wikia content on Smart TVs, a clear commercial use.

A similar event happened at TV Tropes when the site owners single-handedly changed the site's copyright notice from ShareAlike to the incompatible NonCommercial, without notifying nor requesting consent from its contributors. Is this the ultimate fate of all wikis? Do Creative Commons licenses hold any weight for community websites?

Submission + - TV Tropes relicensed all its CC-BY-SA content, without permission

TuringTest writes: In the beginning, pop culture wiki TV Tropes licensed its content with the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license for free content. When Google pulled away its AdSense revenue because of... let's call it NSFW fan fiction, TV Tropes changed its guidelines to forbid tropes about mature content. In response to this move, two forks were eventually created. The admins disliked this move so much that they relicensed all content to the Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike version, despite their site not having requested copyright rights from their users. Only later they added a clause to their Terms of use page requiring all contributors to grant the site irrevocable, exclusive ownership of their edits. Has it ever happened to you that you released free content, and someone changed its license and pretend that it was theirs?

Submission + - Spanish congress rejects Internet censorship law

TuringTest writes: A comission of the Spanish Congress has rejected a law that allowed the closure of web sites that provide no authorized downloads. The government couldn't reach enough support from its allies not because those opposed the law in principle but because of the way it was redacted and the lack of negotiation. Recently the Spanish Senate rejected a law on net neutrality. Also the Wikileaks cables disclosed pressure from the USA to the Spanish government to pass a law to reduce Internet sharing of music and media, which is legal in Spain.
GUI

Submission + - Google acquires BumpTop physical desktop (bumptop.com) 1

TuringTest writes: BumpTop, a company providing a multi-touch physical desktop metaphor has been acquired by Google and made "no longer be available for sale". BumpTop provides a direct way to handle information through simple gestures. Some media see this acquisition as a movement by Google to position against the iPad. Will BumpTop be ported to Android?

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