Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Silicon Valley has created an imaginary staffing shortage (usatoday.com)

walterbyrd writes: As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages.

Submission + - STEM worker shortage is IT industry fantasy (usatoday.com) 1

Tailhook writes: Ron Hira, professor of public policy at Howard University and Paula Stephan is a professor of economics at Georgia State University; `As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages.' — `there is a remarkable concurrence among a wide range of researchers that there is an ample supply of American workers (native and immigrant, citizen and permanent resident) who are willing and qualified to fill the high-skill jobs in this country. The only real disagreement is whether supply is two or three times larger than the demand.'
Japan

Submission + - Japan restarts two of their 50 nuclear reactors (go.com) 1

Darth_brooks writes: "Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda ordered the restart of two idle nuclear reactors Saturday, amid split public response. The Japanese government is trying to fill a summer power shortfall. According to the article, the two reactors supply power to the Kansai region near Osaka, where local officials were predicting a 15% shortfall in power capacity during July and August."
Intel

Submission + - Why Intel leads the world in semiconductor manufacturing (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "When Intel launched Ivy Bridge last week, it didn’t just release a new CPU — it set a new record. By launching 22nm parts at a time when its competitors (TSMC and GlobalFoundries) are still ramping their own 32/28nm designs, Intel gave notice that it’s now running a full process node ahead of the rest of the semiconductor industry. That’s an unprecedented gap and a fairly recent development; the company only began pulling away from the rest of the industry in 2006, when it launched 65nm. But how has Intel managed to pull so far ahead? Joel Hruska of ExtremeTech talks to Mark Bohr, Senior Intel Fellow and the Director of Process Architecture and Integration to find out some of Chipzilla's tips and tricks."
GNOME

Submission + - Linus Torvalds Likes Chrome OS More Than Gnome 3 Shell? (muktware.com) 3

sfcrazy writes: When Linus Torvalds sneezes the Linux world gets a cold. The father of Linux has praised Google Chrombooks for being more useful than Gnome 3 Shell. Linus points out the problem desktops like Gnome(of Ubuntu Unity) are facing with their 'modern' approach. "It allows such radical notions as having easy mouse configurability for things like how to launch applications. Things Gnome removed because those kinds of things were "too confusing", and in the process made useless. And a auto-hide application dock at the bottom."

Submission + - Independent Foxconn audit results appear (yahoo.com)

Tailhook writes: The Fair Labor Association gave Apple's largest supplier the equivalent of a full-body scan through 3,000 staff hours investigating three of its factories and surveying more than 35,000 workers," said FLA president Auret van Heerden. Overtime laws violated, short-changing worker compensation, no representation. AppleFoxconn thinks they might be able to stop their overtime criminality by July. 2013. Perhaps they'll also do something about the bi-annual dust explosions.
Iphone

Submission + - Audit Finds Apple Supplier Violates Chinese Work Rules (wsj.com)

doston writes: The first independent audit of Apple's supply chain found excessive working hours and health and safety issues at its largest manufacturer, piling more pressure on the technology giant. This investigation targeted Hon Hai Precision Industry (not Foxconn, for a fresh change). Should Apple be held responsible for these supplier violations? Will the public ever sour on Apple devices in light of the constant media attention on supplier working conditions?
Science

Submission + - Cellphone Use May Be A Cancer Risk After All (npr.org) 1

An anonymous reader writes: A bunch of experts convened by the World Health Organization have decided that cellphones might pose a risk of brain cancer in humans.

The finding that cellphones are a possible carcinogen is a bit of surprise. Only last year, a WHO-organized study of cellphone risks that was the largest conducted to date found scant evidence to support a link between cellphones and brain cancers.

But a group of 31 experts from 14 countries conducted a review of the scientific literature and determined that the evidence, though limited, could support a connection between cellphone use and brain tumors — cancerous gliomas and acoustic neuromas, which are noncancerous. (A summary of the findings is described in this press release.)

The evidence didn't support a link between the electromagnetic radiation emitted by cellphones with other cancers.

The findings by the cancer experts will be evaluated by WHO and health agencies in individual countries.

The full review will be published in the July 1 issue of the medical journal The Lancet Oncology and will be available online in a few days, the WHO's IARC said.

Science

Submission + - WHO: Cell Phones Are "Possibly Carcinogenic" (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Whether or not cell phones cause brain cancer is a question that's been debated (but not answered) for years, and today the World Health Organization (WHO) stepped into the fray. A WHO committee that evaluates various potential cancer-causing agents concluded that radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, including cell phones, are "possibly carcinogenic" to people.

Submission + - WHO: Cell Phones May Cause Cancer (bbc.co.uk)

Hartree writes: A World Health Organization group of experts doing a review of previous studies concluded that they could not rule out the the possibility that cell phones increase brain cancer risk. The judge the possibility to be great enough to warrant measures to reduce exposure. Hands free operation or testing were mentioned.
Cellphones

Submission + - WHO: Cell phone use can increase possible cancer r (cnn.com) 2

suraj.sun writes: Radiation from cell phones can possibly cause cancer, according to the World Health Organization. The agency now lists mobile phone use in the same "carcinogenic hazard" category as lead, engine exhaust and chloroform.

Before its announcement Tuesday, WHO had assured consumers that no adverse health effects had been established.

A team of 31 scientists from 14 countries, including the United States, made the decision after reviewing peer-reviewed studies on cell phone safety. The team found enough evidence to categorize personal exposure as "possibly carcinogenic to humans."

What that means is that right now there haven't been enough long-term studies conducted to make a clear conclusion if radiation from cell phones are safe, but there is enough data showing a possible connection that consumers should be alerted.

CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/05/31/who.cell.phones/index.html

Graphics

Submission + - WebGL poses new security problems (h-online.com)

Julie188 writes: "Researchers are warning that the WebGL standard undermines existing operating system security protections and offers up new attack surfaces. To enable rendering of demanding 3D animations, WebGL allows web sites to execute shader code directly on a system's graphics card. This can allow an attacker to exploit security vulnerabilities in the graphics card driver and even inject malicious code onto the system."
NASA

Submission + - Secret mini shuttle X37B set to land soon. (suasnews.com)

garymortimer writes: On its way home, after setting out in April the X37 might be back overnight tonight. Making its landing at Vandenberg AFB.

It will be the first ever autonomous re-entry and runway landing.

“Space professionals from the 30th Space Wing will monitor the de-orbit and landing of the Air Force’s first X-37B, called the Orbital Test Vehicle 1 (OTV-1),” says the Air Force in a statement.

“While the exact landing date and time will depend on technical and weather considerations, it is expected to occur between Friday, December 3, and Monday, December 6, 2010.”

The landing date was to be expected, given that the craft has been aloft since April and one of the few known facts about it is that it has a 270-day maximum flight time.

Slashdot Top Deals

Keep your boss's boss off your boss's back.

Working...