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Submission + - SPAM: Canada eTA, Things you Should Keep In Mind

canadaetavisa writes: The Canada government had changed the rules regarding entry to Canada last year. In effect from 10th November, 2016 all visa-exempt foreign nationals need an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to fly or transit through this North American country. An Authorization Canada eTA is a mandatory document used in place of the visa for people who are from visa-exempt nations to get an entry into Canada. Legitimate for five years or until the termination of your passport, it enables you to make as many trips to Canada as you want and even stay there for six months at a stretch. However, the entry requirements using other ways of travel such as road or sea to Canada have not changed.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Apple's iPhone 8 To Replace Touch ID Home Button With 'Function Area' (appleinsider.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple will ditch the home button when it debuts a new 'iPhone 8' model later this year, and will dedicate the extra screen real estate to an area for virtual buttons, according to KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Adding detail to his previous predictions regarding the next-generation handset, Kuo in a note to investors obtained by AppleInsider said the full-screen design will allow Apple to integrate a "function" area never seen in an iPhone. The device is expected to adopt a 5.8-inch OLED panel in a form factor similar to the current 4.7-inch iPhone 7. Despite having extended screen real estate as compared to current iPhone models, the actual active display area on "iPhone 8" will be closer to 5.15 inches on the diagonal, with the remaining bottom portion dedicated to system functions like virtual buttons. While Kuo failed to elaborate on an exact implementation, the note suggests Apple plans to hardcode a set of always-on, static system controls into iOS. Whether the so-called "function area" is capable of switching to an active display mode for in-app activities like watching videos or playing games, remains to be seen. With the deletion of current Touch ID technology, Kuo believes "iPhone 8" will incorporate new bio-recognition assets to take over device security and Apple Pay authentication duties. The analyst did not offer predictions on the type of biometric tech Apple intends to use, but a report earlier today said the company could integrate a 3D laser scanning module capable of facilitating facial recognition and augmented reality applications. Kuo in a note last month said Apple might integrate a dual biometric system utilizing optical fingerprint readers and facial recognition hardware.

Submission + - Your Digital Life Can Be Legally Seized at the Border 3

Toe, The writes: Quincy Larson from freeCodeCamp relates some frightening stories from U.S. citizens entering their own country, and notes that you don't have fourth and fifth amendment rights at the border. People can and have been compelled to give their phone password (or be detained indefinitely) before entering the U.S and other countries. Given what we keep on our phones, he concludes that it is now both easy and legal for customs and border control to access your whole digital life. And he provides some nice insights on how easy it is to access and store the whole thing, how widespread access would be to that data, and how easy it would be for the wrong hands to get on it. His advice: before you travel internationally, wipe your phone or bring/rent/buy a clean one.

Submission + - JavaScript Attack Breaks ASLR on 22 CPU Architectures (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Five researchers from the Vrije University in the Netherlands have put together an attack that can be carried out via JavaScript code and break ASLR protection on at least 22 microprocessor architectures from vendors such as Intel, AMD, ARM, Allwinner, Nvidia, and others. The attack, christened ASLRCache, or AnC, focuses on the memory management unit (MMU), a lesser known component of many CPU architectures, which is tasked with improving performance for cache management operations.

What researchers discovered was that this component shares some of its cache with untrusted applications, including browsers. This meant that researchers could send malicious JavaScript that specifically targeted this shared memory space and attempted to read its content. In layman's terms, this means an AnC attack can break ASLR and allow the attacker to read portions of the computer's memory, which he could then use to launch more complex exploits and escalate access to the entire OS.

Researchers have published two papers [1, 2] detailing the AnC attack, along with two videos[1, 2] showing the attack in action.

Submission + - WikiLeaks Calls on Hackers for Trump's Taxes 1

An anonymous reader writes: WikiLeaks recently tweeted that they would publish Donald Trump’s tax returns if someone will leak them. Given how many people, organizations, companies, and governments have access to Trump’s taxes, it is somewhat of a mystery why hackers have not acquired them yet. However, Russia hacked the Republican National Committee and possibly (probably?) other Trump-related information-stores, and can use it to blackmail the president. Why have regular hackers not come up with anything...or are they just not sharing?

Submission + - Trump's Secret Weapons: Psychology, Facebook Quizzes, And Huge Data (vice.com) 1

tedlistens writes: On November 9 at around 8.30 AM., Michal Kosinski woke up in the Hotel Sunnehus in Zurich. The 34-year-old researcher had come to give a lecture at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) about the dangers of Big Data and the digital revolution. Kosinski gives regular lectures on this topic all over the world. He is a leading expert in psychometrics, a data-driven sub-branch of psychology. When he turned on the TV that morning, he saw that the bombshell had exploded: contrary to forecasts by all leading statisticians, Donald J. Trump had been elected president of the United States.

For a long time, Kosinski watched the Trump victory celebrations and the results coming in from each state. He had a hunch that the outcome of the election might have something to do with his research. Finally, he took a deep breath and turned off the TV.

Did a model initially developed through Facebook quizzes help propel Donald Trump to victory--and nudge the UK to "Brexit"? Two reporters from Zurich-based Das Magazin report at Motherboard on the UK-based big data company Cambridge Analytica--a quiet operation funded by Trump's biggest donor, and one that counts Trump strategist Steve Bannon as a board member.

Submission + - Dell Pushes Intel Kaby Lake-Y Core m Processors To Core i Performance Levels (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Until recently, Intel's lowest powered Kaby Lake variant, known as Kaby Lake-Y, hasn't made much of an appearance in market. Kaby Lake-Y is the the 4.5 — 7 Watt version of Intel's 7th gen processor family intended for thin and light, fanless 2-in-1 devices and tablets. Oddly enough, Intel has done away almost completely with the "Core m" moniker with Kaby Lake, choosing instead to denote the series in the root of the model number, like it does with the more common U series chips that are employed in full-featured ultrabooks. However, the company does list lower-end Core m3 variants of Kaby Lake as such, while i5 and i7 higher-end SKUs are only distinguishable by the Y in the root of the model number. Clear as mud right? There may be a reason for this, as early introductions of Intel's Core m were met with mixed performance reviews. However, with recently introduced Kaby Lake-Y systems, like Dell's XPS 13 2-in-1 hybrid, performance with higher end SKUs like the Core i7-7Y75, with aggressive TDP-up tuning, is more in line with lower-end Core i5 variants of Intel's previous gen Skylake U series that was so prevalent in last year's laptop designs. Dell employs a bit of extra mojo in their design, taking that 7 Watt TDP-up envelope to 9 Watts, providing a longer sustained boost within the confines of their 2.7 pound XPS 13 hybrid. Regardless, with boost clock speeds as high as 3.6GHz for some Kaby Lake-Y chips, this isn't the same level of Core m performance from previous generations Intel processors.

Submission + - SPAM: Legacy systems, hygiene top Air Force 2017 cyber list

Chrismars1988 writes: The Air Force's cyber priority list for 2017 includes updating legacy platforms, hardening mission systems, building cybersecurity into new acquisitions and making Air Force personnel more cyber secure, the Air Force CISO told FCW.

After addressing the audience at the 2017 Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology Winter Summit, Pete Kim told FCW that," this is the year of actually doing a lot of the work that we talked about last year." .Source

Submission + - Trump's Executive Order Eliminates Privacy Act Protections for Foreigners

Kernel Kurtz writes: January 28 is supposed to be Data Privacy Day, so it seems fitting in an alternative sort of way that US President Trump just signed an executive order that eliminates Privacy Act protections for foreigners. As a non-American, I find it curious that the person who says he wants to bring jobs to America is simply confirming the post-Snowden belief that America is not a safe place to do business. Does anyone else see a conflict here?

Submission + - Trump executive order prompts Google to recall staff (bbc.co.uk)

AmiMoJo writes: Google has recalled travelling staff members to the US after an executive order from President Donald Trump restricting entry for nationals of seven Muslim-majority countries. Google has told the BBC it is concerned about the order and any measures which could block great talent from the US. There have already been reports of "green card" holders, who are allowed to work in the US, being prevented from getting on flights.

Submission + - Twitter Releases National Security Letters (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Today, Twitter joined the ranks of Yahoo, Cloudflare and Google by announcing it had received two national security letters, one in 2015 and one in 2016. The NSLs came with gag orders that prevented Twitter from telling the public or the targeted users about the government’s demands. The FBI recently lifted these gag orders, allowing Twitter to acknowledge the NSLs for the first time. In the newly-published NSLs, the FBI asked Twitter to turn over “the name, address, length of service, and electronic communications transactional records” of two users. Twitter associate general counsel Elizabeth Banker said that the company provided a “very limited set of data” in response to the requests, but did not make clear exactly what kind of data Twitter provided. “Twitter remains unsatisfied with restrictions on our right to speak more freely about national security requests we may receive,” Banker wrote in a blog post. “We would like a meaningful opportunity to challenge government restrictions when ‘classification’ prevents speech on issues of public importance.”

Submission + - US Intelligence Seeks a Universal Translator For Text Search In Any Language (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA), the U.S. Intelligence Community’s own science and technology research arm, has announced it is seeking contenders for a program to develop what amounts to the ultimate Google Translator. IARPA’s Machine Translation for English Retrieval of Information in Any Language (MATERIAL) program intends to provide researchers and analysts with a tool to search for documents in their field of concern in any of the more than 7,000 languages spoken worldwide. The specific goal, according to IARPA’s announcement, is an “‘English-in, English-out’ information retrieval system that, given a domain-sensitive English query, will retrieve relevant data from a large multilingual repository and display the retrieved information in English as query-biased summaries.” Users would be able to search vast numbers of documents with a two-part query: the first giving the “domain” of the search in terms of what sort of information they are seeking (for example, “Government,” “Science,” or “Health”) and the second an English word or phrase describing the information sought (the examples given in the announcement were “zika virus” and “Asperger's syndrome”). The system would be used in situations like natural disasters or military interventions in remote locations where the military has little or no local language expertise. Those taking on the MATERIAL program will be given access to a limited set of machine translation and automatic speech recognition training data from multiple languages ”to enable performers to learn how to quickly adapt their methods to a wide variety of materials in various genres and domains,” the announcement explained. “As the program progresses, performers will apply and adapt these methods in increasingly shortened time frames to new languages... Since language-independent approaches with quick ramp up time are sought, foreign language expertise in the languages of the program is not expected.” The good news for the broader linguistics and technology world is that IARPA expects the teams competing on MATERIAL to publicly publish their research. If successful, this moonshot for translation could radically change how accessible materials in many languages are to the rest of the world.
 

Submission + - Why Have Hackers Failed on Trump's Tax Returns? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Given the size of Donald Trunp's holdings, the documentation of his financial holdings must be enormous. His tax returns are undoubtedly worked on by large staffs in multiple companies. How is it possible that no hacker has found them yet? Wikileaks recently stated they will publish the returns, and still...nothing. Is it really imaginable that not a single hacker has managed to find any part of these widely-distributed documents?

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