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Privacy

Submission + - G-archiver includes "stolen" code says DLL

An anonymous reader writes: Pawel Lesnikowski, the author of mail.dll — a well respected .NET dll has put up a post on his website alleging that the author of G-archiver, John Terry stole his code. This follows the recent discovery by Dustin Brooks of G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords. Commentators on the original coding horror blog posting have not only confirmed Dustin's discovery but have also highlighted John Terry's involvement with matemedia.com. John Terry himself is still denying any wrong doing.
Security

G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords 462

Thwomp writes "It appears that a popular Gmail backup utility, G-Archiver, has been harvesting users' Gmail passwords. This was discovered when a developer named Dustin Brooks took a look at the code using a decompiler. He discovered a Gmail account name and password embedded in the source code. Brooks logged in and found over 1,700 emails all with user account information — with his own at the top. According to a story in Informationweek, he deleted the emails, changed the account password, and notified Google. The creator of G-Archiver has pulled the software, stating that it was debug code and was unintentionally left in the product."
Security

Submission + - G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords

Thwomp writes: It appears that a popular GMail back up utility, named G-Archiver, has been harvesting users GMail passwords, this was discovered when a Dustin Brooks took a look at the code using a decompiler. He discovered that user's account information was being sent by e-mail to another GMail account. With that account's password embedded in the source code the developer logged in and found over 1700 e-mails all with user's account information! The creator of G-Archiver has pulled the software stating that it was debug code and was unintentionally left in by a developer.
Censorship

Submission + - Wikileaks - CCHR Exposed As Scientology front (wikileaks.org) 2

Anonymous writes: "Wikileaks is now hosting a compressed archive of leaked emails that prove once and for all the "Citizens Commission on Human Rights" (CCHR), which mostly campaigns against Psychiatry, is a front of the Church of Scientology.

These files, submitted to Wikileaks by members of the 'Anonymous' group dedicated to peacefully protesting the Church of Scientology (CoS) organization, are internal e-mails sent to them from someone who formerly was, or maybe currently still is, on the inside of one of the organizations.

They reveal outlines of plans on how CCHR/CoS intend to distribute propaganda on the Internet, and compelling evidence that practice of 'Fair Game' in many forms is still alive and well, and aimed at not just critics but media establishments and members of the press. Though the term 'Fair Game' itself is no longer used by the organization, the intent is clear.

There is also potential evidence of the Scientologists often denied policy of "Disconnection" from families that was recently once again brought to light by the launching of exscientologykids by the ex scientologists Kendra Wiseman, Astra Woodcraft, and most damning of all Jenna Miscavige, the niece of the Chairman of the Board of the Church of Scientology.

The emails concerning their propaganda campaign may prove that the CCHR is guilty of breaking US laws against illegal lobbying, "The intent of these laws is to keep rich lobbying interests from looking bigger than they are. So that a small group of people (who may be pushing a particular piece of legislation) can make it look like there is a groundswell of public support (or opposition) when there is in fact no such thing."

Finally, if even $1 is proved to have transferred between the CCHR and the CoS, it is highly illegal, and should bring about the downfall of the Church of Scientology's US Tax exemption from the IRS and these emails certainly give cause for an investigation into their accounts."

Portables (Apple)

Submission + - What Would you Ask Steve Jobs?

Pickens writes: "Chris Howard has an interesting post at Apple Matters where he posits the hypothetical: what would you say to Steve Jobs if you had five minutes with him? Howard says he would first thank Jobs for holding on to the vision that good design is important in computer hardware and software but then he's ask for more USB ports on the back of Macs, an ergonomic keyboard, and a more affordable iPhone plan. "You might want to talk about the '70s, life in the wilderness, Pixar, his top five management secrets or whatever, but, despite my best intentions, I guess I'd probably just babble on like an average user," adds Howard. What would you ask Steve Jobs if you had five, or maybe ten minutes with him?"
Cellphones

Submission + - Bill could force Apple, AT&T to unlock iPhone 1

quantumghost writes: When T-Mobile began selling Apple's iPhone in Germany last fall, a legal skirmish ensued, forcing the wireless carrier to sell it untethered to a contract — at $1,460, no less. T-Mobile eventually persuaded a court that the two-year contract was legal. Now that same kind of European rule would be imported into the United States — meaning AT&T would be legally required to sell a contract-free iPhone — if a new Democratic proposal in the U.S. House of Representatives becomes law.

http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9879554-7.html
The Military

Submission + - VG Software Models Crowds In Military Simulator (gamecritics.com)

Brandon Erickson writes: "While videogame technology has been used before to model enemy behavior in military training simulations, it has yet to be applied to modeling the behavior of noncombatants in warzones. But that's all about to change thanks to Dr. Frederick McKenzie and his colleagues, whose research is presented in the March issue of Simulation & Gaming. Their work, sponsored by the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Joint Forces Command, uses the commercially available AI.implant software to incorporate realistic crowd behavior into a military simulator."
Businesses

How Do You Find Programming Superstars? 763

Joe Ganley writes "You are a programming superstar, and you are looking for work. I recognize this happens relatively rarely, which is part of my problem. But stipulating that it happens, how do I, as a company looking to hire such people, connect with them? Put another way, how do you the programming superstar go about looking for a company that seems like one you'd like to work for? The company I work for is a great place to work; we only hire really great people, we work on hard, interesting problems, and we treat our employees well. We aren't worried about retention or even about how to entice people to work here once we've found them. The problem is simply finding them. The signal-to-noise ratio of the big places like Monster and Dice is terrible. We've had much better luck with (for example) the Joel on Software job boards, but that still doesn't generate enough volume." What methods have other people used to find the truly elite?
Security

Submission + - Strong passwords prohibited 1

Atario writes: "This post and thread over at The Daily WTF made me realize I was not the only one experiencing a strange phenomenon: the prohibition of strong passwords by the very sites that most need them — financial institutions. A quick Google search reveals that the observation is also far from new. We're talking short maximum lengths, smashing case, disallowing special characters (really freaky ones like "!" or "."), and so on. Yet most of them seem to realize requiring both numbers and letters is a Good Thing. What is going on here?"

Submission + - Poll; Do you still use tape drives?

Digimer writes: "Four year ago I began writing an open-source backup program. I made the decision back then that I would not support tape drives, as I felt they were obsolete in the face of cheap, large "disk" storage. As I began demo'ing the first version a couple years ago, the most frequent question I got was "Does it support tape drives?".

Now, I am writing the next version. So I want to ask Slashdot to help me with a very formal, scientific poll:

1. Do you use tape drives?
2. If you were looking at a new backup solution, would you want it to support tape drives?"
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft screening serch results?

afilonov writes: "Sherry Gil from Seeking Alpha wonders if Microsoft removes some search results, particularly sites which have AdSense or Google Search links (article). I did a bit of my own search, looks like author is right."
Media (Apple)

Submission + - Universities hand out iPhones & iPods to fresh (acu.edu)

srck writes: ACU has announced that the 08/09 incoming students will all be given an Apple device, after being a participant in a trial including Harvard, MIT, Stanford, and Yale, providing access to learning materials via Apple iPod Touches and iPhones, extending the iTunes University concept over wi-fi. From the article:

At ACU — the first university in the nation to provide these cutting-edge media devices to its incoming class — freshmen will use the iPhones or iPod touches to receive homework alerts, answer in-class surveys and quizzes, get directions to their professors' offices, and check their meal and account balances — among more than 15 other useful web applications already developed, said ACU Chief Information Officer Kevin Roberts.

Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - MMOGCHART.COM Updated! (mmogchart.com)

SirBruce writes: "MMOGCHART.COM has finally been updated after a long hiatus. New subscription numbers are available for several MMOGs, most notably to World of Warcraft, RuneScape, Dofus, Tibia, and NCSoft's various titles. Also included are preliminary numbers for Vanguard: Saga of Heroes, Lord of the Rings Online, and Tabula Rasa. Check out the Charts section for all the latest graphs and the Analysis and Conclusions section for a discussion of the methodology and research, as well as information on each individual game."
The Courts

Submission + - RIAA "expert witness" exposed (blogspot.com)

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "Prof. Johan Pouwelse of Delft University — one of the world's foremost experts on the science of P2P file sharing and the very same Prof. Pouwelse who stopped the RIAA's Netherlands counterpart in its tracks back in 2005 — has submitted an expert witness report characterizing the work of the RIAA's expert, Dr. Doug Jacobson, as "borderline incompetence". The report (pdf), filed in UMG v. Lindor, pointed out, among other things, that the steps needed to be taken in a copyright infringement investigation were not taken, that Jacobson's work lacked "in-depth analysis" and "proper scientific scrutiny", that Jacobson's reports were "factually erroneous", and that they were contradicted by his own deposition testimony. This is the first expert witness report of which we are aware since the Free Software Foundation announced that it would be coming to the aid of RIAA defendants."

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