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Submission + - AG scores victory in bid to shut down Indian Point (lohud.com)

mdsolar writes: Federal safety regulators used the wrong data to analyze the potential economic impacts of a severe accident at the Indian Point nuclear power plant, a panel of commissioners for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ruled Wednesday.

The ruling, which reversed an earlier finding, will force the NRC to conduct a fresh analysis of the costs of a devastating accident and cleanup at the nuclear power plant in Buchanan, 24 miles north of New York City.
The decision was hailed by New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, whose office is spearheading the state’s challenge to Indian Point’s efforts to renew federal licenses for its two reactors. Schneiderman estimates that some 1.5 million workers would be needed in to take part in decontamination efforts in the event of a nuclear mishap, with cleanup costs surging as high as $1 trillion.

Submission + - Apparently Slashdot Mobile Pushed Malvertising Back In January (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Crooks used malicious ads (malvertising) to push a fake Android Marshmallow update to Android users accessing a series of high-profile news sites. The malicious ads were found on the mobile versions of reputable sites such as Slashdot and Android Police, but also on local news sites in France (20 Minutes) and Germany (SPON).

This campaign was unique compared to other mobile malvertising waves because it used a never seen before trick which auto-downloaded the fake Android 6.0 upgrade package on the devices without any kind of user interaction.

Submission + - FBI Wants to Exempt Its Massive Biometric Database from Federal Privacy Rules (nextgov.com)

schwit1 writes: The FBI wants to block individuals from knowing if their information is in a massive repository of biometric records, which includes fingerprints and facial scans, if the release of information would "compromise" a law enforcement investigation.

The FBI’s biometric database, known as the “Next Generation Identification System,” gathers a wide scope of information, including palm prints, fingerprints, iris scans, facial and tattoo photographs, and biographies for millions of people.

On Thursday, the Justice Department agency plans to propose the database be exempt from several provisions of the Privacy Act — legislation that requires federal agencies to share information about the records they collect with the individual subject of those records, allowing them to verify and correct them if needed.

Aside from criminals, suspects and detainees, the system includes data from people fingerprinted for jobs, licenses, military or volunteer service, background checks, security clearances, and naturalization, among other government processes.

Submission + - OpenWrt Fork Promises Greater Openness (hackerboards.com)

DeviceGuru writes: The ubiquitous, router-oriented, lightweight OpenWRT embedded Linux distribution is being forked by some of OpenWRT's core developers into a new Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE) distribution. The new distro's goal is to provide greater transparency, inclusiveness, and decentralization than the current OpenWrt project. The LEDE project is billed as both a 'reboot' and 'spinoff' distro that will make it 'easy for developers, system administrators, or other Linux enthusiasts to build and customize software for embedded devices, especially wireless routers,' according to the group. The ELEC announcement, which was signed by Jo-Philipp Wich and six other former OpenWrt core members, claims that LEDE represents a significant share of the most active members of the OpenWrt community.

Submission + - The Small Town Judge Who Sees a Quarter of the Nation's Patent Cases (vice.com)

derekmead writes: Since taking the bench in 2011—moving literally across the street from his law office into the district courthouse—Judge Rodney Gilstrap has become one of the most influential patent litigation judges in the country. In 2015, there were 5,819 new patent cases filed in the US; 1,686 of those ended up in front of Judge Gilstrap. That’s more than a quarter of all cases in the country; twice as many as the next most active patent judge.

This busy patent docket didn’t blossom overnight, and it’s not some strange coincidence. Due to some unique rules around intellectual property filings, patent holders can often file their lawsuits at any district court in the country, even if neither the plaintiff nor the defendant is based there. By introducing a list of standing court orders and local regulations, the Eastern District of Texas (and, in particular, Gilstrap’s division of Marshall) has become the court of choice for many plaintiffs, especially non-practicing entities, often referred to as patent trolls.

Submission + - Failing Tanks Have Hanford Site Cascading Towards Disaster

An anonymous reader writes: As the cleanup of the Hanford nuclear waste site slide continually further behind schedule local news sources are reporting that even the newer doubled walled tanks are failing to contain the high level waste. Looming on the horizon is a DOE prediction from 2008 that puts the window where contamination from the begins reaching the Columbia River only four years away.

Submission + - I finally caught them in the act! 5

fustakrakich writes: Slashdot is deleting comments!

I am asking you if you find this acceptable. To me it isn't. Indelible comments is Slashdot's only advantage it has over other what are now simple news aggregators. Deletions will mean the end of any of that. Better that the place shuts down completely. Please help save Slashdot. Don't let your comments be deleted. Please. Without Slashdot, there is no internet.
Hardware

'Universal' Memory Aims To Replace Flash/DRAM 125

siliconbits writes "A single 'universal' memory technology that combines the speed of DRAM with the non-volatility and density of flash memory was recently invented at North Carolina State University, according to researchers. The new memory technology, which uses a double floating-gate field-effect-transistor, should enable computers to power down memories not currently being accessed, drastically cutting the energy consumed by computers of all types, from mobile and desktop computers to server farms and data centers, the researchers say."
Transportation

How Chrysler's Battery-Less Hybrid Minivan Works 347

thecarchik writes "Chrysler announced Wednesday that it would partner with the US Environmental Protection Agency to build and test prototypes of a different kind of hybrid vehicle, one that accumulates energy not in a battery pack but by compressing a gas hydraulically. The system in question, originally developed at the EPA labs, uses engine overrun torque to capture otherwise wasted energy, as do conventional hybrid-electric vehicles. The engine is Chrysler's standard 2.4-liter four-cylinder, the base engine in its minivan line. But rather than turning a generator, that torque powers a pump that uses hydraulic fluid to increase the pressure inside a 14.4-gallon tank of nitrogen gas, known as a high-pressure accumulator."
Wikipedia

Wikipedia and the History of Gaming 240

Wired is running a story about Wikipedia's tremendous contribution to documenting the history of video games, and why it shouldn't necessarily be relied upon. Quoting: "Wikipedia requires reliable, third-party sources for content to stick, and most of the sites that covered MUDs throughout the ’80s were user-generated, heavily specialized or buried deep within forums, user groups and newsletters. Despite their mammoth influence on the current gaming landscape, their insular communities were rarely explored by a nascent games journalist crowd. ... while cataloging gaming history is a vitally important move for this culture or art form, and Wikipedia makes a very valiant contribution, the site can’t be held accountable as the singular destination for gaming archeology. But as it’s often treated as one, due care must be paid to the site to ensure that its recollection doesn’t become clouded or irresponsible, and to ensure its coalition of editors and administrators are not using its stringent rule set to sweep anything as vitally relevant as MUDS under the rug of history."
Security

Doorways Sneak To Non-Default Ports of Hacked Servers 63

UnmaskParasites writes "To drive traffic to their online stores, software pirates hack reputable legitimate websites injecting hidden spammy links and creating doorway pages. Google's search results are seriously poisoned by such doorways. Negligence of webmasters of compromised sites makes this scheme viable — doorways remain unnoticed for years. Not so long ago, hackers began to re-configure Apache on compromised servers to make them serve doorway pages off of non-default ports, still taking advantage of using established domain names."
Security

Submission + - Doorways on Non-default Ports of Hacked Servers (unmaskparasites.com) 1

UnmaskParasites writes: To drive traffic to their online stores, software pirates hack reputable legitimate websites injecting hidden spammy links and creating doorway pages. Google's search results are seriously poisoned by such doorways. Negligence of webmasters of compromised sites makes this scheme viable — doorways remain unnoticed for years. Not so long ago, hackers began to re-configure Apache on compromised servers to make them serve doorway pages off of non-default ports, still taking advantage of using established domain names.
Government

Bill Calls For Wi-Fi Base Stations In All Federal Buildings 196

GovTechGuy submits this from Hillicon Valley: "Sens. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) and Mark Warner (D-Va.) introduced legislation on Friday that would require all public federal buildings to install WiFi base stations in order to free up cell phone networks. The Federal Wi-Net Act would mandate the installation of small WiFi base stations in all publicly accessible federal buildings in order to increase wireless coverage and free up mobile networks. The bill would require all new buildings under construction to comply and all older buildings to be retrofitted by 2014. It also orders $15 million from the Federal Buildings Fund be allocated to fund the installations."
PlayStation (Games)

USAF Unveils Supercomputer Made of 1,760 PS3s 163

digitaldc writes with this excerpt from Gamasutra: "The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has connected 1,760 PlayStation 3 systems together to create what the organization is calling the fastest interactive computer in the entire Defense Department. The Condor Cluster, as the group of systems is known, also includes 168 separate graphical processing units and 84 coordinating servers in a parallel array capable of performing 500 trillion floating point operations per second (500 TFLOPS), according to AFRL Director of High Power Computing Mark Barnell."

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