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Submission + - Healthcare.gov Official Resigns, Website Still a Disaster (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: A government official who helped oversee the bug-riddled Healthcare.gov Website has resigned his post. Tony Trenkle, Chief Information Officer (CIO) for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which oversees Healthcare.gov, will reportedly join the private sector after he departs on November 15. A spokesperson for the Medicare agency refused to say whether he had been forced out, telling reporters: “Tony made a decision that he was going to move to the private sector and that is what our COO announced yesterday.” Because of his supervisory role, Trenkle is considered a significant player in the Website’s development; The New York Times indicated that he was one of two federal officials who signed an internal memo suggesting that security protocols for the Website weren’t in place as recently as late September, a few days before Healthcare.gov’s launch.Following Trenkle’s resignation, Health and Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius admitted to the Senate Finance Committee that Healthcare.gov would require hundreds of fixes. “We’re not where we need to be,” she said. “It’s a pretty aggressive schedule to get to the entire punch list by the end of November.” Sebelius added that she was ultimately accountable for what she termed the “excruciatingly awful” rollout. Healthcare.gov has experienced massive problems since its Oct. 1 debut. In addition to repeated crashes and slow performance, the Website’s software often prevents people from setting up accounts. President Obama has expressed intense frustration with the situation, but insists the Affordable Care Act (ACA) backing the Website remains strong. “The essence of the law, the health insurance that’s available to people is working just fine,” he told reporters in October. “The problem has been that the website that’s supposed to make it easy to apply for insurance hasn’t been working.” While the federal government won’t release ‘official” enrollment numbers until the end of November, but it’s clear that the Website’s backers are losing the battle of public perception.

Submission + - Government Agencies Unable to Share Information in Event of Cyber Attack (defenseone.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "The departments of Homeland Security and Defense, including the National Security Agency, have no way of sharing current alerts about computer breaches with each other or industry, an inspector general memorandum reveals.

The problem is not an inability to document incidents, but, rather, an inability to alert potential victims as the situation unfolds and to provide instructions."

Sci-Fi

Submission + - Ray Bradbury Hates the Internet (nytimes.com) 1

untorqued writes: The New York Times recently ran an article about Ray Bradbury. A longtime fan of libraries, he's recently been raising money to help bridge the budget gap for a library in Ventura, California.. He's no fan of the Internet, though:

"The Internet is a big distraction," Mr. Bradbury barked from his perch in his house in Los Angeles, which is stuffed silly with enormous stuffed animals, videos, DVD's, wooden toys, photographs and books, with things like the National Medal of Arts sort of tossed on a table. "Yahoo called me eight weeks ago," he said, voice rising. "They wanted to put a book of mine on Yahoo! You know what I told them? 'To hell with you. To hell with you and to hell with the Internet.' " "It's distracting," he continued. "It's meaningless, it's not real. It's in the air somewhere." A Yahoo spokeswoman said it was impossible to verify Mr. Bradbury's account without more details.

At least he used the singular forms of Yahoo and Internet.

Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft 'offers' $10k to IE users (ostatic.com)

ruphus13 writes: In the latest attempt to battle the declining share of Internet Explorer, Microsoft is dipping into its huge cash reserves to provide 'incentives' to people to switch to IE. In a new move, Microsoft is offering $10,000 in prize money that is 'buried' somewhere on the Internet, but can only be retrieved by using IE. Of course, several people will use IE, and a few will hopefully continue to do so even after 'discovery'. From the post, "How desperate is Microsoft to woo users to its Internet Explorer version 8 browser? Mozilla Chair Mitchell Baker points out in a blog post that Microsoft is now offering $10,000 in prize money "buried somewhere on the Internet" which you can only find if you use Internet Explorer. Come on Microsoft, Internet Explorer needs a lot more than this marketing campaign to shore up its prospects...Until Microsoft fosters the kind of free, open extensibility for its browser that Firefox has, it remains doomed to watch Internet Explorer continue to lose market share."
The Media

Submission + - Hollywood's walking dead

ragerover writes: "Hollywood biz blogger Nikki Finke has posted a telling story http://www.deadlinehollywooddaily.com/new-report-says-hollywood-is-holding-back-its-best-content-from-the-web/ on how content providers can regain control of their product: The lede: "Technophiles who think that the Internet is going to topple Hollywood studios, TV networks, and cable companies have their heads up their asses. That's what the analysts at Bernstein Research say — in more polite language, of course — inside the 80-page transcript out today from their confab this past Monday called 'Web Video... Friend or Foe And To Whom?' The answer, it seems, is that Big Media can put the brakes on progress long enough to figure out how they'll get paid.""

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