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Comment illegally? (Score 1) 2

wouldn't this be a textbook legal fair-use of DRM removal ? i own the copy, and the "manager" of those rights is no more. that 3rd party-added drm is illegally preventing me to access my legally bought content. as i bought an electronic facsimile copy and, as such, it can't have any "code" or drm, or nothing, its just an electronic representation of a printed text. IANAL obviously.

Comment Re:Bah! (Score 1) 181

Sad.

This is not how real life works.

She signed a contract, this is in it. period. Are you really suggesting with a straight face that it would be ok for a company to unilaterally break a binding work contract cos she made people ACTUALLY GO TO WORK ?? ... indeed, the devil incarnate, burn the bitch !!!

This is exactly the kind of entitlement problem that faces the workforce today. Yours obviously, not hers. Me? i´d just want to know who she hired to negotiate her contract!

Submission + - When users want malware

johnjaydk writes: How do You handle users who insists on installing malware? I'm running a nice tight ship where users can't install stuff and now I face a rebellion because I don't allow them to install malware. I can't even explain the concept of malware to them.
Security

Submission + - When vuln disclosures are outlawed (theregister.co.uk)

doperative writes: 'Legal goons from Magix AG sent a nasty gram to a researcher who goes by "Acidgen" after he reported the stack buffer overflow in the company's Music Maker 16. According to the report, Acidgen alerted Magix representatives to the bug in several emails that also included proof-of-concept code that forced the Windows calculator to open, indicating the flaw could be exploited to execute malicious code on a victim's computer.

"They misunderstood that I was getting money for doing this ... and illegally breaking into networks" link

Comment: of course the vulnerability isn't in the application but in the underlying Operating System ...

Submission + - Nottingham Uni student arrested under terriosm act (bisa.ac.uk) 1

An anonymous reader writes: On May 15 2008, two university members — a student and a member of staff — were arrested under the Terrorism Act (2000) because they possessed copies of the"Al-Qaeda Training Manual" which had been downloaded from the United States Department of Justice website. An extended version of the same document is available for sale in book form on Amazon.com. The student, a member of the university's Politics and International Relations department, was researching terrorism for his postgraduate studies and was being advised by a friend of his, who was a former student and administrative member of staff. Both men were held in police custody for six days before being released without charge.
The Terrorism Act (2000) stipulates that: "A person commits an offence if he possesses an article in circumstances which give rise to a reasonable suspicion that his possession is for a purpose connected with the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism."

The postgraduate tutor of the student at that time has submitted a paper to the British International Studies Association documenting how the university helped get these men arrested and what the university has done to cover up the story since

Space

Submission + - FBI Releases Document Confirming Roswell UFO (fbi.gov) 8

schwit1 writes: An investigator for the Air Force stated that three so-called flying saucers had been recovered in New Mexico. They were described as circular in shape with raised centers approximately 50 feet in diameter. Each one was occupied by three bodies of human shape, but only 3 feet tall dressed in metallic clothing of very fine texture.
The Internet

Comcast Accused of Congestion By Choice 434

An anonymous reader writes "A kind soul known as Backdoor Santa has posted graphs purportedly showing traffic through TATA, one of Comcast's transit providers. The graphs of throughput for a day and month, respectively, show that Comcast chooses to run congested links rather than buy more capacity. Keeping their links full may ensure that content providers must pay to colocate within Comcast's network. The graphs also show a traffic ratio far from 1:1, which has implications for the validity of its arguments with Level (3) last month."
Privacy

Sheriff's Online Database Leaks Info On Informants 185

Tootech writes with this snippet from NPR: "A Colorado sheriff's online database mistakenly revealed the identities of confidential drug informants and listed phone numbers, addresses and Social Security numbers of suspects, victims and others interviewed during criminal investigations, authorities said. The breach potentially affects some 200,000 people, and Mesa County sheriff's deputies have been sifting through the database to determine who, if anyone, is in jeopardy. ... The FBI and Google Inc. are trying to determine who accessed the database, the sheriff said. Their concern: That someone may have copied it and could post it, WikiLeaks-style, on the Internet. 'The truth is, once it's been out there and on the Internet and copied, you're never going to regain total control,' Hilkey said. Thousands of pages of confidential information were vulnerable from April until Nov. 24, when someone notified authorities after finding their name on the Internet. Officials said the database was accessed from within the United States, as well as outside the country, before it was removed from the server."

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