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Submission + - IBM Giving Everyone Access To Its Quantum Computing Processors (fortune.com)

An anonymous reader writes: IBM said on Wednesday that it's giving everyone access to one of its quantum computing processors, which can be used to crunch large amounts of data. Anyone can apply through IBM Research's website to test the processor, however, IBM will determine how much access people will have to the processor depending on their technology background — specifically how knowledgeable they are about quantum technology. With the project being "broadly accessible," IBM hopes more people will be interested in the technology, said Jerry Chow, manager of IBM's experimental quantum computing group. Users can interact with the quantum processor through the Internet, even though the chip is stored at IBM's research center in Yorktown Heights, New York, in a complex refrigeration system that keeps the chip cooled near absolute zero.

Submission + - Study Suggests Free Will Is An Illusion (iflscience.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A new paper published in the journal Psychological Science has attempted to define and investigate the subject of free will. By asking participants to anticipate when they thought a specific color of circle would appear before them, something determined completely by chance, the researchers found that their predictions were more accurate when they had only a fraction of a second to guess than when they had more time. The participants subconsciously perceived the color change as it happened prior to making their mental choice, even though they always thought they made their prediction before the change occurred. They were getting the answers right because they already knew the answer. “Our minds may be rewriting history,” Adam Bear, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Psychology at Yale University and lead author of the study, said in a statement. The implication here is that when it comes to very short time scales, even before we think we’ve made a conscious choice, our mind has already subconsciously decided for us, and free will is more of an illusion than we think.

Submission + - The Generation of Lost Ideas: Myopic Procrastination

TheRealHocusLocus writes: Glen Wurden would rather hold out to build a fusion powered rocket to intercept asteroids and comets, because he considers nuclear bombs 'unsafe'. ITER will take even longer than ever before but some day fusion power will be better than we could possibly imagine. Tesla is ready to sell you a $35k electric car today that runs (mostly) on electricity inefficiently produced by coal and natural gas. Solar and Wind advocates dream of a Earth-spanning HVDC Supergrid so that the intermittency and inefficiency of those energy sources becomes a global-scale problem with a few catastrophic points of failure. And the Sci-Tech beat goes on... bringing us a steady stream of glorious click-bait Futures.

As we sip champagne at the ribbon-cutting of great endeavors and some distant future, are we endangering ourselves? What awful things could happen between now and then? Pundits like to stir anger by declaring some group of young people a 'Lost Generation', but it is never as simple as that. I do believe there is such thing as a Generation Of Lost Ideas. These are things that some may consider unpalatable, the things Real Engineers would *demand* be done right now to ensure survival. Stuff like having a planetary defense rather than none at all. A world powered by Fission before Fusion. Grids powered by non-fossil electricity to run those electric vehicles. A whole middle-game of ideas is missing. Aside from predictable disagreement with my own views, can you think of other examples?

Submission + - Regis McKenna's 1976 notes on his new client, Apple Computer (fastcompany.com)

harrymcc writes: Apple, which was established as a partnership on April 1, 1976, officially turns 40 today. Over at Fast Company, I wrote about its original marketing guru, Regis McKenna, and the notes he took when he was formulating a marketing plan for the company that year. They're an amazing snapshot of where the tiny startup was and where it hoped to go.

Submission + - French bill carries 5-year jail sentence for company refusals to decrypt data fo (dailydot.com)

Patrick O'Neill writes: Employees of companies in France that refuse to decrypt data for police can go to prison for five years under new legislation from conservative legislators. The punishment for refusing to hand over access to encrypted data is a five year jail sentence and $380,000 fine. Telecom companies would face their own penalties, including up to two years in jail. French politicians criticized American companies in particular: "They deliberately use the argument of public freedoms to make money knowing full well that the encryption used to drug traffickers, to serious [criminals] and especially to terrorists. It is unacceptable that the state loses any control over encryption and, in fact, be the subject of manipulation by U.S. multinationals.”

Submission + - Push To Hack: Reverse engineering an IP camera (contextis.com)

tetraverse writes: For our most recent IoT adventure, we've examined an outdoor cloud security camera which like many devices of its generation a) has an associated mobile app b) is quick to setup and c) presents new security threats to your network.

Submission + - Stephen Elop Assumes Position In McMaster University

jones_supa writes: Technology maven Stephen Elop is coming home. McMaster University has officially announced that the former alumnus and Microsoft and Nokia executive has been named the distinguished engineering executive in residence at the school's faculty of engineering. It is an advisory position, where he will give insights into new research and teaching opportunities, as well as helping to translating academic knowledge to a wider audience. He will also give lectures twice a year, as well as sit on the dean's advisory council and act as an advisor to the dean. Elop is an alumnus of the McMaster Computer Engineering and Management Program, where he graduated in 1986. The faculty also awarded him with an honorary doctor of science degree in 2009.

Submission + - Developers gather to help charities at massive virtual hack.summit() conference (hacksummit.org)

An anonymous reader writes: hack.summit (https://hacksummit.org) looks like a very interesting event — a pure virtual conference with a speaker roster that's surprisingly strong. The kicker is that it's all for charity to help coding non-profits. Lots of credible tech companies are behind it (Github, StackOverflow, IBM, etc). Part of the event is a global hackathon, where developers can hack over a weekend to help charities and win prizes.

Submission + - 18TB of Fraternal Order of Police data hacked (thecthulhu.com) 1

Dave_Minsky writes: Yesterday, someone by the name of Cthulhu released 18TB of sensitive data from the Fraternal Order of Police. The FOP is America's largest police union with more than 325,000 members in more than 2,100 lodges nationwide.

According to Cthulhu's website, the data were "submitted to me through a confidential source, and have asked me to distribute it in the public interest."

Submission + - How do I get Microsoft to get up off their asses & look at a Windows 10 prob (live.com) 4

mykepredko writes: My product communicates with a host system via Bluetooth (using the Serial Port Profile) and each time a device is connected to a PC a couple of serial ports are allocated. Windows has always had a problem with not automatically disposing of the allocated ports when the connection is removed, but until Windows 10, there were processes for deleting them. This isn't possible for Windows 10 (which apparently has new Serial/Com port and/or Bluetooth drivers) — but individuals, who are apparently working for Microsoft, periodically reply with useless suggestions or attempt to promote questions and ideas as solutions to the problem: http://answers.microsoft.com/e... I suspect that this is an issue for all Windows 10 users (although I guess few people are plugging/unplugging devices) — so how do we get Microsoft to take notice (and not have to pay for them to fix their bug)?
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Submission + - VMWare lays off Fusion and Workstation development team (chipx86.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The entire Hosted UI team, responsible for VMware’s Workstation and Fusion products, have been laid off and the future of these products is now unclear with rumors future maintenance will be outsourced to China.

Submission + - The Dark Arts: Meet the LulzSec Hackers (hackaday.com)

szczys writes: Reputations are earned. When a small group of hackers who were part of Anonymous learned they were being targeted for doxing (having their identities exposed) they went after the person hard, taking down two of the company websites, the CEO's Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, and even his World of Warcraft accounts. The process was fast, professional, and like nothing ever seen before. This was the foundation of Lulz Security and the birth of a reputation that makes LulzSec an important part of black hat history.

Submission + - Under New Management (bizx.info)

kodiaktau writes: DHI Group, Inc. (NYSE: DHX), today announced that it completed the sale of its Slashdot and SourceForge businesses (together referred to as "Slashdot Media") to BIZX, LLC in a transaction that closed on January 27, 2016. Financial terms were not disclosed.

DHI first announced its plan to sell Slashdot Media in July 2015 as part of its strategy to focus on its core brands, as Slashdot Media no longer fits within the Company's core strategic initiatives.

KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. served as the Company's exclusive financial advisor for the transaction.

Submission + - Slashdot Media sold to BIZX, LCC

An anonymous reader writes: DHI (formerly Dice Holdings) has finalized the sale of Slashdot Media (consisting of Slashdot and SoureForge) to BIZX, LLC on January 27th, 2016, according to a press release on Thursday morning. No financial details were given in the press release, nor any details about how Slashdot or SourceForge will be handled by their new owners.

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