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Submission + - The U.S. plan to bomb Pagan Island, the worst place ever (guamblog.com)

dcblogs writes: The U.S. is being sued over its plan to take one of the Pacific's most beautiful places, Pagan Island, and turn into a training facility and bombing range for the U.S. military. “Families who formerly resided on Pagan would be forever banished from returning to their home island, which would be turned into a militarized wasteland,” according to the lawsuit filed by lawsuit filed by Earthjustice, which is representing some the groups in the Northern Mariana Islands fighting this action. The 18-square-mile island, which is part Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and a U.S. territory, is about about the size of Hartford, Conn. It is a volcanic island, shaped by magma and violent explosions. There are large rock outcrops, cliffs, King Kong Island-type vistas, relatively high elevations and plateaus. The island was evacuated in 1981 because of volcanic activity, but a handful of people have taken up residence. The government's proposal is reminiscent of the takeover of Bikini Atoll in 1946, which was used for nuclear testing. The U.S. Environmental Impact Statement suggest that the government has made plans to protect the native’s island wildlife. For instance, consider the protections for the fruit bat. “The proposed 0.5- mile (0.8-kilometer) buffer zone around each (Fruit Bat) colony will significantly reduce the potential for aircraft strikes of fruit bats.” [Emphasis added]

Submission + - Towards A Global Network Of Neighbourhoods And Cities Rejecting Surveillance

Presto Vivace writes: Connect with other rebel cities and collectives

To free ourselves from surveillance and other repressive and authoritarian forms of power that this opens up, we must immediately activate the mechanisms of law that allow us to oversee the functions of mass surveillance systems in our cities. And do this collectively, in coordination with other cities affected by the problem. Just as there are Smart Cities networks we should form our own Rebel Cities networks where surveillance is rejected and participatory democracy is affirmed, a democracy framed in respect for human rights and diversity, focused on collective solutions, which is the true path to safer cities. Not cameras.

We can then simultaneously activate collaborative mechanisms to prevent their expansion. Make freedom of information requests for public information detailing their costs. Demand studies on their results. Take serious legal action in face of possible illegal uses of surveillance for discriminatory policies. Demand from authorities protection of personal data where it exists, and where it does not, demand that human rights authorities undertake feasibility studies, weighing the impact on individual guarantees before installing systems. Democracy begins and ends there. In its exercise.

This is why it matters who gets elected to city council.

Government

Submission + - Congress, at Last Minute, Drops Requirement to Obtain Warrant to Monitor Email (allgov.com) 1

davidwr writes: Before passing the Video Privacy Protection Act Amendments Act, the Senate dropped an amendment which would require the feds to get warrants before looking at mail older than 6 months that is stored on a 3rd-party server.

This means the status quo, dating from the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, remains.

China

Submission + - World's Longest High Speed Rail Line Opens in China (inhabitat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Today China continued rolling out the future of high speed rail by officially unveiling the world’s longest high-speed rail line — a 2,298-kilometer (1,428-mile) stretch of railway that connects Beijing in the north to Guangzhou in the south. The first trains on the new route hit 300 kph (186 mph), cutting travel time between the two cities by more than half.
News

Submission + - FDA Closer to Approving Biotech Salmon, Critics Furious (medicaldaily.com)

delishfruit writes: A controversial genetically engineered salmon has moved a step closer to the consumer's dining table after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday the fish didn't appear likely to pose a threat to the environment or to humans who eat it.
  AquAdvantage salmon eggs would produce fish with the potential to grow to market size in half the time of conventional salmon. If it gets a final go-ahead, it would be the first food from a transgenic animal — one whose genome has been altered — to be approved by the FDA.

 

Privacy

Submission + - Lax SSH key management a big problem

cstacy writes: Tatu Yionen, inventor of SSH, says he feels "a moral responsibility" to come out of retirement and warn that a "little-noticed problem" could jeopardize the security of much of the world's confidential data. He is referring to the management (or lack thereof) of SSH keys (i.e. "authorized_keys") files. He suggests that most organizations simply allow the SSH key files to be created, copied, accumulated, and abandoned, all over their network, making easy pickings for intruders to gain access.

Do you think this is a widespread problem?
How does your company manage SSH keys?
Security

Submission + - Critical Security Vulnerability Discovered in Nvidia ForceWare (ngohq.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A freelance security consultant by the name of Peter Winter-Smith has discovered a stack buffer overflow in Nvidia's drivers that could allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to compromise your system and gain control over it.
Ubuntu

Submission + - Ubuntu Unity In 2013 Will Be All About Mobile: Mark Shuttleworth Swapnil Bharti (muktware.com) 2

sfcrazy writes: Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu, has shared his plans for 2013. It was clear from the Nexus 7 initiative that Ubuntu is eventually looking into the mobile space more seriously. Google created the cheap device Ubuntu was looking for wider testing and development. The initial builds of Ubuntu for Nexus 7 also showed that despite popular perception Unity is far from ready for the mobile devices. In fact quite a lot of 'controversial' technologies introduced in Unity don't fit on a mobile devices such as Global Menus or HUD.

So there are many challenges for Mark — redesign Unity for mobile, which may upset users again, get Ubuntu app developers to redesign apps for Ubuntu mobile, get top developers to write apps for Ubuntu... Is it all feasible when companies like RIM or Microsoft are struggling or is Ubuntu becoming a me too company which is not brining anything new to the table and is simply trying to claim a pie?

Submission + - Scientists Construct First Map of How the Brain Organizes Everything We See

An anonymous reader writes: Our eyes may be our window to the world, but how do we make sense of the thousands of images that flood our retinas each day? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that the brain is wired to put in order all the categories of objects and actions that we see. They have created the first interactive map of how the brain organizes these groupings.

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