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Submission + - Comapny disables software of buyer who posted "bad" review

Brymouse writes: Ham Radio Deluxe, a $99 radio control and logging program popular in the amateur radio community, disabled the software of a user after he posted a potentially bad review (was 3/5 stars, now 1/5). Further this user was directed to install the update which disabled the application by HRD's own support.

The original thread was then deleted from "news" site QRZ.com as HRD is a major advertiser and complained about copyright violations from the user posting a PDF of his support ticket. Reddit picked it up here and more research was done showing a pattern of blacklisting bad reviews.

This was picked up by Jason Scott, of the internet archive, on twitter and Ham Radio Deluxe threatened him with libel for posting it.

As of yesterday HRD says an offical statement will be "coming soon". The Strieisand Effect continues with QRZ.com undeleting the threads and HRD still trying to claim copyright on their customers support ticket.
Science

Computers Emulate Neanderthal Speech 220

Clarence writes "After some 30,000 years of silence, the Neanderthal race is once again speaking thanks to some advanced computer simulation. A Florida Atlantic University professor is using software vocal tract reconstructions to emulate the speech of our long-dead distant relatives. 'He says the ancient human's speech lacked the "quantal vowel" sounds that underlie modern speech. Quantal vowels provide cues that help speakers with different size vocal tracts understand one another, says Robert McCarthy, who was talking at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Columbus, Ohio, on April 11. In the 1970s, linguist Phil Lieberman, of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, inferred the dimensions of the larynx of a Neanderthal based on its skull. His team concluded that Neanderthal speech did not have the subtlety of modern human speech.'"

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