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Submission + - SPAM: Racism: It's Not Just For White People Anymore.

Scarred Intellect writes: An article in the Porland Tribune of Porland, OR explains how the peanut butter sandwich is a device of the ruling white and demonstrates white privilege. Or something.

The principle at the local K-12 school states that, in response to a teacher's lesson involving B&J sandwiches: '“Another way would be to say: ‘Americans eat peanut butter and jelly, do you have anything like that?’ Let them tell you. Maybe they eat torta. Or pita.” ' because "...Somali or Hispanic students...might not eat sandwiches."

Comparing ethnicity to race or...country origins? Smart lady. Americans aren't a race.

The article goes on to discuss how it's OK to have a Latino and black boys' drum class but we need to avoid anything that emphasizes the white privilege. Gutierrez, the principle, "vehemently rejects any suggestion that it is discrimination to offer a club catering to minority boys."

She brings this program of Courageous Conversations from California (which probably explains everything).

While further down in the article Gutierrez has seemingly made some impressive improvements in the quality of education, she seems desperately misguided in saying that '“When white people do it, it is not a problem, but if it’s for kids of color, then it’s a problem?” says Gutierrez, 40, an El Paso, Texas, native whose parents were Mexican immigrants. “Break it down for me. That’s your white privilege, and your whiteness.”'

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Prove your IT knowledge without expensive certificates?

An anonymous reader writes: I'm starting my phd in psychology this year and plan to finance this period with IT freelance work, mostly building websites with drupal and setting up linux networks, servers etc.. Now I have a little problem: Since I never studied ICT nor followed a course that resulted in a certificate I can only prove my knowledge by actually doing stuff or showing what I've done so far. Unfortunately that isn't always sufficient to convince potential customers. So I was wondering what other slashdotters do, are there any free or cheap alternatives to get certificates or other more convincing ways to prove your IT knowledge?

Thanks for any help in advance!

Submission + - The 12 Most Dreaded Help Desk Requests (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "'Working on an IT help desk can feel like an endless case of déjà vu. Let's face it: Computer users are damn predictable. If you've heard a problem once, you've heard it a thousand times before. Some things, though, have been said so many times that they've practically become help desk clichés — and the very sound of them is enough to make any IT pro want to smack his or her head with the nearest blunt object.'"

Submission + - World's Subways Share Common Mathematical Structure

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "No two subway systems have the same design. New York City’s haphazard rail system differs markedly from the highly organized Moscow Metro, or the tangled spaghetti of Tokyo’s subway network. Now BBC reports that a study analyzing 14 subway networks around the world has discovered that the distribution of stations within each of the subway networks, as well as common proportions of the numbers of lines, stations, and total distances seem to converge over time to a similar structure regardless of where the networks were, when they were begun, or how quickly they reached their current layout. "Although these (networks) might appear to be planned in some centralized manner, it is our contention here that subway systems like many other features of city systems evolve and self-organize themselves as the product of a stream of rational but usually uncoordinated decisions taking place through time," write the study authors. The researchers uncovered three simple features that make subway system topologies similar all around the world. First, subway networks can be divided into a core and branches, like a spider with many legs. The “core” typically sits beneath the city’s center, and its stations usually form a ring shape. Second, the branches tend to be about twice as long as the width of the core. The wider the core, the longer the branches. Last, an average of 20 percent of the stations in the core link two or more subway lines, allowing people to make transfers. "The apparent convergence towards a unique network shape in the temporal limit suggests the existence of dominant, universal mechanisms governing the evolution of these structures.""

Submission + - Henry Kissinger Gets TSA Pat-Down (washingtonpost.com) 1

TheGift73 writes: "Seems no one is immune from the tender mercies of the TSA pat-down. First, we learned that Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, was subjected to a handsy search. And now we learn of the latest high-profile search-ee: former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

Yeah, the guy who was once an advisor to presidents, the one who helped negotiate the end to the Vietnam War...and, oh yeah, he’s got a Nobel Peace Prize."


Submission + - Ask Slashdot : Is RS232 communication secure ? 1

An anonymous reader writes: I want to connect 2 computers so that they can exchange data securely.

Computer A wouldn't be connected to anything except to computer B and should be safe at all cost from remote attacks.
Computer B would be connected obviously to computer A and to the internet.

The communication between A and B would consist of encrypted data sent by a custom software written by me.
A knows how to decrypt the data, but B doesn't.

If I connect A and B with a RS232 cable, can a remote attacker take control of A if he has control of B ?
I understand that if B is compromised, the attacker can monitor the communications, corrupt them etc ... but can he take control of A ?
A colleague of mine tells me it's impossible, but I'd rather be sure.

My original idea was to create a kind of telegraph to make the 2 computers communicate throught Morse code.

Thank you for your input.
Please note that English is not my mother tongue, please forgive me for any error that I might have left out.

Submission + - Israel Passes Photoshop Law to Combat Anorexia 3

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Atlantic reports that the Israeli parliament has passed legislation that prohibits fashion media and advertising with models who fall below the World Health Organization's standard for malnutrition banning underweight models as determined by Body Mass Index. The new law also stipulates that any ad which uses airbrushing, computer editing, or any other form of Photoshop editing to create a slimmer model must clearly state that fact. Advertising campaigns created outside of Israel must comply with the legislation's standards in order to appear in Israel. "I realized that only legislation can change the situation," says Rachel Adato, an Israeli parliament member with a background in medicine. "There was no time to educate so many people, and the change had be forced on the industry. There was no time to waste, so many girls were dieting to death." The measure has been controversial within Israel for raising the question of where free speech bumps up against the fashion industry's responsibility — and its possible harm — to its customers' psychological wellbeing. Donald Downs, a professor at the University of Wisconsin and an expert on the First Amendment, says that it would be very tough to pass something like Israel's law in the US Congress. "In the US, it would be hard to justify this type of law on either legal or normative policy grounds," says Downs. "The Israeli law is paternalistic in that it prohibits something because of the effect it might have on others in the longer term.""

Submission + - Microsoft backs away from CISPA support, citing privacy (cnet.com)

suraj.sun writes: Microsoft has been counted as a supporter of CISPA since the beginning. Now the company tells CNET any new law must allow "us to honor the privacy and security promises we make to our customers" and protect "consumer privacy." Microsoft is no longer as enthusiastic about a controversial cybersecurity bill that would allow Internet and telecommunications companies to divulge confidential customer information to the National Security Agency. The U.S. House of Representatives approved CISPA by a 248 to 168 margin on Thursday, in spite of a presidential veto threat and warnings from some House members that the measure represented "Big Brother writ large."

Microsoft added that it wants to "ensure the final legislation helps to tackle the real threat of cybercrime while protecting consumer privacy." That's a noticeable change — albeit not a complete reversal — from Microsoft's position when CISPA was introduced in November 2011. To be sure, Microsoft's initial reaction to CISPA came before many of the privacy concerns had been raised. An anti-CISPA coalition letter (PDF) wasn't sent out until April 16, and a petition that garnered nearly 800,000 signatures wasn't set up until April 5.

What makes CISPA so controversial is a section saying that, "notwithstanding any other provision of law," companies may share information with Homeland Security, the IRS, the NSA, or other agencies. By including the word "notwithstanding," CISPA's drafters intended to make their legislation trump all existing federal and state laws, including ones dealing with wiretaps, educational records, medical privacy, and more.


Submission + - Max Payne 3 is a 35GB install on PC

An anonymous reader writes: If you’re a fan of the Max Payne games, and intend playing it on PC, be glad that hard drive prices are returning back to normal following the flooding last year. The reason being, Rockstar Games seems to be going for a world record in storage requirements for Max Payne 3.

The system specifications for the third game in the series have been released, and the hard drive requirements certainly stand out. The minimum space required on your disk? 35GB.

What implications does that have? Game will ship on at least 4 DVDs, the digital download version will take forever to complete, and I'm concerned about level load times if this much data is needed for the game...

Submission + - Squadron of lost WWII Spitfires to be exhumed in Burma (foxnews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Like a treasure chest stuffed with priceless booty, as many as 20 World War II-era Spitfire planes are perfectly preserved, buried in crates beneath Burma — and after 67 years underground, they're set to be uncovered. The planes were shipped in standard fashion in 1945 from their manufacturer in England to the Far East country: waxed, wrapped in greased paper and tarred to protect against the elements. They were then buried in the crates they were shipped in, rather than let them fall into enemy hands, said David Cundall, an aviation enthusiast who has spent 15 years and about $200,000 in his efforts to reveal the lost planes.

Submission + - Graphene Helps A Robot Creep Like An Inchworm (acs.org) 1

LilaG writes: To develop new materials for robotics, scientists have developed graphene-based actuators that convert electricity into motion. In robots, actuators act like muscles, driving the movement of mechanical arms and fins. Most actuator materials, such as ceramics and conductive polymers, respond slowly, require a lot of power, or provide very little force. To make speedy, strong actuators, Chinese researchers coated graphene paper with the polymer polydiacetylene. Graphene provides a highly conductive, flexible backing for the fragile polymer crystals, which deform in response to electrical current. The actuators can bend 200 times per second and generate more force than most current materials. Using a sheet of the material, the scientists built a simple inchworm robot that arches and relaxes to crawl forward.

Submission + - How did your representative respond to SOPA concer (pastebin.com) 1

jeff.j.jeff writes: When I expressed my concerns about SOPA & PIPA to Senator Bennet, I received a response which led me to realize he had co-sponsored PIPA. He started his response by saying

"Let me begin by saying that honoring intellectual property rights is vital to our economy. Every incident of stolen intellectual property costs American businesses billions of dollars and results in the loss of thousands of jobs through copyright infringement and the sale of counterfeit goods."

This response has changed my opinion of him completely. I would like to know what types of responses others received from their elected officials. Did your opinion of them change?


Submission + - Milky Way "Grown" on a Computer (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: If you can create a baby in a test tube, why not an entire galaxy in a computer? For the first time, astronomers have modeled a mix of gas, stars, and dark matter that came together to give birth to a galaxy resembling our Milky Way. The ambitious simulation promises to yield insight into the galaxy's origin and evolution.

Submission + - DHS Warns Of Planned Anonymous Attacks (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "The Department of Homeland Security on Fridayissued a somewhat unusual bulletin warning the security communityabout the planned activities of hacking collective Anonymous over the next few months. It warns financial services companies especially to be on the lookout for attempts by Anonymous to 'solicit ideologically dissatisfied, sympathetic employees' to their cause. The unclassified communique is addressed broadly to those in charge of cybersecurity and critical infrastructure protection and also warns about new tools Anonymous has said it plans to use in launching future attacks. One is dubbed #RefRef, which is said to be capable of using a server's resources and processing power to conduct a denial of service (DoS) attack against itself. 'Anonymous has stated publicly that the tool will be ready for wider use by the group in September 2011,' the DHS said. But although there have been several publicly available tools that claim to be versions of #RefRef, so far it's unclear what the 'true capabilities of #RefRef are.' The bulletin also cites the so-called Apache Killer tool, for which there is a recent fix."

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