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Google

Submission + - Google Unveils Official URL Shortener (blogspot.com)

iONiUM writes: "Today Google has officially release its own URL shortener: g.co, with the public shortener page of goo.gl. On their blog, it notes "There’s no need to fret about the fate of goo.gl; we like it as much as you do, and nothing is changing on that front. It will continue to be our public URL shortener that anybody can use to shorten URLs across the web." As well, it can be assumed they will start using this service shortly on Google+ shared links, along with Buzz and other services."
Robotics

Submission + - Japan’s Robot Picks Only the Ripest Strawber (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: The Institute of Agricultural Machinery at Japan’s National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, along with SI Seiko, has developed a robot that can select and harvest strawberries based on their color. Ripened berries are detected using the robot’s stereoscopic cameras, and analyzed to measure how red they appear. When the fruit is ready to come off the vine, the robot quickly locates it in 3D space and cuts it free. From observation to collection, the harvesting process takes about 9 seconds per berry. Creators estimate that it will be able to cut down harvesting time by 40%.
Transportation

Submission + - A Giant Cargo Ship's Pollution = 50 MILLION Cars (greencarreports.com)

thecarchik writes: One giant container ship pollutes the air as much as 50 million cars. Yes, that's 50 million. Which means that just 15 ships that size emit as much as today's entire global "car park" of roughly 750 million vehicles. Among the bad stuff: Sulfur, soot, and other particulate matter that embeds itself in human lungs to cause a variety of cardiopulmonary illnesses. Since the mid-1970s, developed countries have imposed increasingly strict regulations on auto emissions. In three decades, precise electronic engine controls, new high-pressure injectors, and sophisticated catalytic converters have cut emissions of nitrous oxides, carbon dioxides, and hydrocarbons by more than 98 percent. New regulations will further reduce these already minute limits.
But ships today are where cars were in 1965: utterly uncontrolled, free to emit whatever they like. Just one of many statistics: A car driven 9,000 miles a year emits 3.5 ounces of sulfur oxides--while the engine in a large cargo ship produces 5,500 tons.

Submission + - Sculptor gives a 'hint' for Kryptos (nytimes.com)

omega_cubed writes: "The New York Times reports that Jim Sanborn, the sculptor who created the wavy metal pane called Kryptos that sits in front of the CIA in Langley, VA, has gotten tired of waiting for code-breakers to decode the last of the four messages.

“I assumed the code would be cracked in a fairly short time,” [Sanborn] said, adding that the intrusions on his life from people who think they have solved his fourth puzzle are more than he expected. So now, after 20 years, Mr. Sanborn is nudging the process along. He has provided The New York Times with the answers to six letters in the sculpture’s final passage. The characters that are the 64th through 69th in the final series on the sculpture read NYPVTT. When deciphered, they read BERLIN.

"

Games

Submission + - Don't get naked while playing Xbox Kinect (gamepron.com) 1

UgLyPuNk writes: The latest gaming blockbuster from Harmonix, the Kinect-enabled Dance Central hit shelves this week and already it’s taking the world by storm.

I was trying out the Kinect Dance Central game and I was getting hot so I took off my clothes. I had no idea that the game was going to take A BUNCH OF PICTURES OF ME

Hardware

Submission + - Solar Keyboards: Did Logitech Start a Trend? (i4u.com)

i4u writes: Earlier this week Logitech revealed the K750 solar keyboard. This device uses 2.4 GHz wireless tech and has a lux meter to let you know when light levels are sufficient. It can stay charged for three months in the dark and can even charge from light indoors. Altogether, an elegant solution to the problem of wireless keyboards with crappy batteries. Now LCD panel maker AU Optronics has revealed their own 14" solar touchscreen keyboard. It is just 2.1 mm thick, with the solar module built into the notebook cover and keyboard panel. Apparently, this innovation reduces power draw by an impressive 20%. It is due to be showcased in mid-November.

Submission + - E-voting machine votes 100% wrong (newbernsj.com)

steveha writes: The New Bern, NC Sun Journal newspaper reports that some local voters have seen the e-voting machine record the exact opposite of the voter's request. There is a button to vote a straight Republican ticket, and when pushed, it voted a straight Democrat ticket. A local voter observed this behavior four times in a row; the fifth time, the button worked correctly. If ATMs were this unreliable, no bank would use them. Why is this level of failure acceptable in voting machines?
Google

Submission + - Google Unveils GingerBread Android OS (pcmag.com)

adeelarshad82 writes: Google has officially unveiled the next version of Android OS, Gingerbread, via a new addition to its statuary. The statue was placed next to the statues of the preceding Android OSes, "Eclair" and "Froyo". While the new Android OS is suppose to have a number of new features; according to a recent interview with Andy Rubin the OS will probably target more forms of communications like social media, faster and more robust platform and possibly the reinvention of casual gaming. That said, analyst are putting together their own list of things they want to see with the new OS which unsurprisingly includes tablets from Google.
Science

Submission + - Moving Monopoles Caught on Camera (sciencedaily.com)

Thorfinn.au writes: Science Daily is reporting on magnetic monopoles.
For decades, researchers have been searching for magnetic monopoles — isolated magnetic charges, which can move around freely in the same way as electrical charges. Magnetic poles normally only occur in pairs. Now a team of researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and University College Dublin has managed to create monopoles in the form of quasiparticles in an assembly of nanoscale magnets and to observe how they move using a microscope at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) to make the magnetic structures visible.
As with the elementary monopoles, which were first predicted by the British physicist Paul Dirac in 1931, each monopole is connected by a "string" to a monopole of opposite charge. The two monopoles can nevertheless move independently of each other. These results are not only of scientific interest, but could also provide a basis for the development of future electronic devices. The results are published online in the journal Nature Physics (Oct. 17, 2010).

Hardware

Submission + - Scary USB marketing device 8

snookerhog writes: My boss just came back from a trade show and passed me one of these USB marketing devices. I assumed that it was just a micro flash drive that had some web links or PDFs on it so I stuck it in my computer. After a brief delay and quick driver install, my Run window (Windows 7) opened on its own and typed in a URL to the advertising company's website. This little device is not a storage media, but a crafty little keyboard emulator.

this tech is new to me and it seems pretty scary, especially since I am logged in to my computer with admin rights. Anyone else played with one of these?
Google

Submission + - Google Maps Adds Drone Imagery 1

joshuadugie writes: Slashdot carried a story a while ago that Google had purchased drones for unknown purposes. Google Maps has not added new non-satellite imagery (http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&hq=&ll=30.286747,-97.738924&spn=0.00318,0.004128&t=h&z=19) when you zoom in close enough. Mystery solved!
Science

Submission + - West Virginia is geothermically active (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Researchers have uncovered the largest geothermal hot spot in the eastern United States. According to a unique collaboration between Google and academic geologists, West Virginia sits atop several hot patches of Earth, some as warm as 200C and as shallow as 5 kilometers. If engineers are able to tap the heat, the state could become a producer of green energy for the region.

Submission + - Geek wedding ring? 13

RoadNotTaken writes: Dear Slashdot,
I finally bit the bullet and decided to get married. My fiance and I are looking for wedding rings and I find myself disappointed that they have so-few features. Are there any geeky rings out there that can do something useful? I'm thinking USB or RFID but am open to suggestions. There has to be SOMETHING good you can do with a chunk of metal on your finger...
Google

Submission + - Cherrypal mini-laptop now runs Android (cherrypal.com) 1

kriston writes: The Cherrypal Asia laptop at http://www.cherrypal.com/ is now shipping with Google Android installed. This replaces the older Cherrypal Asia mini laptops that were running Windows CE and Linux based. Both laptops run the ARM9-based VIA 8505 SoIC platform at 533 MHz with 256 megabytes of RAM and 2 gigabytes of NAND flash. The $148 version has a 1024x600 screen while the sub-$100 model runs 800x480. I'm looking forward to seeing how Android can squeeze more throughput out of the VIA 8505 since Windows CE didn't do such a great job on the original Cherrypal Asia.

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