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Submission + - The Silent Killer, Hepatitis C, Meets Its Match

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: An estimated three to four million Americans are infected with "the silent killer," Hepatitis C, but most people who are infected do not know it because it can take decades for the virus to damage the liver sufficiently to cause symptoms. Now Andrew Pollack writes in the NYT that medicine may be on the brink of turning the tide against hepatitis C, a plague that kills more Americans annually than AIDS and is the leading cause of liver transplants. If the effort succeeds, it will be an unusual conquest of a viral epidemic without using a vaccine. “There is no doubt we are on the verge of wiping out hepatitis C,” says Dr. Mitchell L. Shiffman. Over the next three years new drugs are expected to come to market that will cure most patients with the virus, in some cases with a once-a-day pill taken for as little as eight weeks, and with only minimal side effects. The new drugs are specifically designed to inhibit the enzymes the hepatitis C virus uses to replicate, the same approach used to control HIV. But the big difference is that HIV forms a latent reservoir in the body, so HIV drugs must be taken for life to prevent the virus from springing back. Hepatitis C does not form such a reservoir, so it can be eliminated permanently. Many doctors are now “warehousing” their hepatitis C patients — urging them to forgo treatment until the new drugs are approved. But the new drugs are expected to cost from $60,000 to more than $100,000 for a course of treatment and some critics worry that the bill will be run up when huge numbers of people who would have done fine without them turn to the drugs. “The vast majority of patients who are infected with this virus never have any trouble,” says Dr. Ronald Koretz. "Since the vast majority of patients become infected after age 20, most patients infected with hepatitis C will have to die of something else before their livers fail."

Submission + - Nanowires Improve Graphene Conductance (

MTorrice writes: "Researchers may have found a way to turn one-atom-thick sheets of graphene into a promising material for making transparent electrodes needed in solar cells and displays. Transparent electrodes in today’s devices are made of indium tin oxide films. These films are typically 90% transparent and have a resistance of less than 100 ohms. But they are expensive and brittle. Graphene could be a stronger, lower-cost, and more bendable alternative. However, the resistance of a typical graphene sheet is usually more than 500 ohms. By integrating metal nanowires into conventionally grown graphene films, researchers lowered the films’ resistance. The resulting material is 94% transparent and has a resistance of 64 ohms."

Submission + - the worlds first anonymous general purpose operating system ( 2

S414m4n63r writes: Whonix (called TorBOX or aos in past) is an anonymous general purpose operating system based on Virtual Box, Debian GNU/Linux and Tor. By Whonix design, IP and DNS leaks are impossible. Not even malware with root rights can find out the user's real IP/location.

This is because Whonix consists of two (virtual) machines. One machine solely runs Tor and acts as a gateway, which we call Whonix-Gateway. The other machine, which we call Whonix-Workstation, is on a completely isolated network. Only connections through Tor are possible.

Wireless Networking

Submission + - Should Wireless Carriers be required to Back-up Cell Towers? ( 1

broadbandconvergent writes: "Lets’ be realistic when we ask if government should act as “big brother” and require Wireless Industry carriers to back-up cell towers in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. This issue came to light before Sandy began its rampage on the East Coast this past week. As reported by the Huffington Post, legislation was introduced prior to the mega storm that ravaged the New York, and New Jersey coastal landscape. Such government mandates would have required cell phone carriers to back-up their cell towers with power generators. The legislation went nowhere fast, struck down by heavy wireless industry lobbying."

Submission + - First Fan-Sponsored Ad Runs on Network TV (

blackbearnh writes: Fans can be passionate about their favorite TV programs, but the Bronies (adult My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic) fans have taken it to the next level. In an effort to support the show, they have purchased commercial air time on The HUB, the network that airs My Little Pony.

The ad thanks the makers of the show for doing such a good job, and encourages viewers to donate to Toys for Tots to show their appreciation. As far as can be determined, this is the first time (Star Trek included!) that fans of a show have ever purchased advertising time. The group that produced the ad, The Brony Thank You Fund, is also in the middle of fundraising to endow an animation scholarship at CalArts.


Submission + - HP becomes a platinum member of the Linux Foundation (

who_stole_my_kidneys writes: "Snagging a first-class upgrade might empty out the contents of your wallet, but be glad you're not trying to buy your way to the Linux Foundation's top table. With a strategic investment of $500,000, Hewlett Packard has just become a platinum member of the body, alongside companies like Intel, Qualcomm and Samsung. In exchange for all that cash, HP gets a seat on the Foundation's board of directors and will have a say in how to advance the foundation's aims — and hopefully give Open webOS a gentle push, too."

Submission + - How To Cover Your Tracks Online (

snydeq writes: "Steganography expert Peter Wayner discusses six techniques that help obscure the data and traces you leave online. 'The truth is, worrying about the trail of digital footprints and digital dustballs filled with our digital DNA is not just for raving paranoids. Sure, some leaks like the subtle variations in power consumed by our computers are only exploitable by teams of geniuses with big budgets, but many of the simpler ones are already being abused by identity thieves, blackmail artists, spammers, or worse.' What tools and techniques do you use to ensure greater privacy and better security of personal data on the Web?"

Submission + - Gate One 1.1 Released: Demo Now With More Nethack (

Riskable writes: "Version 1.1 of Gate One (HTML5 terminal emulator/SSH client) is now available (download). New features include major performance improvements (both client and server-side), security enhancements, mobile browser support, improved terminal emulation, automatic syntax highlighting of syslog messages, PDFs can now be captured/displayed just like images, Python 3 support, Internet Explorer (10) support, a new tutorial on how to embed Gate One into other apps, a new theme (Solarized), an Example plugin, and a whole heck of a lot more (full release notes). There's also a new demo up at where you can play terminal games (nethack, zangband, greed, vitetris, and more), surf the web in lynx, and a use full suite of IPv6-enabled network tools (ping, traceroute, nmap, dig, and a wicked fast domain name checker)."

Feed Science Daily: Researcher Doubts U.S. Program To Track Avian Flu In Wild Birds (

Government monitoring for H5N1 focuses on migrating waterfowl in Alaska. According to an expert, a more effective system to detect the appearance of H5N1 would track wild birds all along the Atlantic and Pacific "flyways" of North America. An investigator, closely following the spread of the avian influenza known as H5N1, said that U.S. government monitoring efforts easily could miss the entry of the virus into North America.

Feed Science Daily: Milk And Egg Allergies Harder To Outgrow (

Considered "transitional" a generation ago, milk and egg allergies now appear to be more persistent and harder to outgrow, according to new research. In what are believed to be the largest studies to date of children with milk and egg allergies, researchers followed more than 800 patients with milk allergy and nearly 900 with egg allergy over 13 years, finding that, contrary to popular belief, most of these allergies persist well into the school years and beyond.

More Details Emerge On Domestic Spying Programs 282

The feed brings us this NYTimes story giving new details on the telecom carriers' cooperation with secret NSA (and other) domestic spying programs. One revelation is that the Drug Enforcement Agency has been running a program since the 1990s to collect the phone records of calls from US citizens to Latin America in order to catch narcotics traffickers. Another revelation is what exactly the NSA asked for in 2001 that Qwest balked at supplying. According to the article, it was access to the company's most localized communications switches, which primarily carry domestic calls.

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