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Submission + - Donald Knuth Worried About the "Dumbing Down" of Computer Science History (

An anonymous reader writes: Thomas Haigh, writing for Communications of the ACM, has an in-depth column about Donald Knuth and the history of computer science. It's centered on a video of Knuth giving a lecture at Stanford earlier this year, in which he sadly recounts how we're doing a poor job of capturing the development of computer science, which obscures vital experience in discovering new concepts and overcoming new obstacles. Haigh disagrees with Knuth, and explains why: "Distinguished computer scientists are prone to blur their own discipline, and in particular few dozen elite programs, with the much broader field of computing. The tools and ideas produced by computer scientists underpin all areas of IT and make possible the work carried out by network technicians, business analysts, help desk workers, and Excel programmers. That does not make those workers computer scientists. ... Computing is much bigger than computer science, and so the history of computing is much bigger than the history of computer science. Yet Knuth treated Campbell-Kelly's book on the business history of the software industry (accurately subtitled 'a history of the software industry') and all the rest of the history of computing as part of 'the history of computer science.'"

Submission + - Mac and Android Users Charged More on Shopping Sites Than iPhone and PC Users (

concertina226 writes: Computer science researchers from Boston's Northeastern University have proved that e-commerce sites are tracking the online shopping habits of people and will charge individuals different prices, depending on what type of device they are using to access a website.

300 participants ran product searches earlier this year on the websites of 16 big US and international retailers, online travel agencies and car rental companies.

Their search results showed that retailers like Home Depot, Sears, JC Penneys, Macy's, Cheaptickets, Orbitz, Priceline, Expedia and Travelocity have been charging higher prices to users on Macs or Android devices, and some retailers had been giving out secret discounts to users on certain devices.


Neil Flesch writes: “In MITCHELLVILLE, Iowa — The Police Department is offering a new program to fight teenager drug use. They are giving parents free drug testing kits. The program is called “Test my Teen.” The test checks for the 10 most common illegal drugs like marijuana, cocaine, and meth. Parents can pick up vouchers at the department to order the kits online. Parents only have to pay for shipping. The test can be performed in less than three minutes.” Source: whotv.

Today, when I read this news, something in my intimate, reminded me of an old saying that, in other words, is something like this: “Worthy of yourself is whom acknowledge mistakes, doing everything for repair them at the right time, not harming the March of Truth”. What is your honest opinion about this news of whotv?

My intuition keeps telling me that we still maintain the serious defect of continuing with the old and bad habits, to always fight the effects without worrying (read more)

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Google to replace GTK+ with its own Aura in Chrome ( 1

sfcrazy writes: Google‘s Chromium team is working on an alternative of Gtk+ for the browser called Aura. Elliot Glaysher, a Google developer explains, “We aim to launch the Aura graphics stack on Linux in M35. Aura is a cross-platform graphics system, and the Aura frontend will replace the current GTK+ frontend.” Free Software community is debating is Google trying to do Canonical? Couldn't Google just switch to Qt which is becoming an industry standard?

Submission + - Google Finds Fraudulent Certificates Used by French Government (

wiredmikey writes: Google announced on Saturday that it detected a French government agency using unauthorized digital certificates for several Google domains to perform man-in-the-middle attacks on a private network.

Google security engineer Adam Langley said the company traced the fraudulent certificates to Agence nationale de la sécurité des systèmes d’information (ANSSI), a French certificate authority that falls under the government's cyber-security agency. "ANSSI has found that the intermediate CA certificate was used in a commercial device, on a private network, to inspect encrypted traffic with the knowledge of the users on that network," Langley noted in a blog post.

In a separate statement, ANSSI blamed "human error" for the incident.

Google's Langley described the incident as a "serious breach" and warned that the company is considering additional actions.

Submission + - GoDaddy Up For Auction (

An anonymous reader writes:, the closely held website that registers Internet domain names, has put itself up for sale in an auction that could fetch more than $1 billion, people familiar with the matter said. The company, which currently has more than 43 million domains under management is well known for its edgy advertising, including Super Bowl commercials and ads featuring different "Go Daddy Girls," including racing car driver Danica Patrick.

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