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Submission + - Connected TVs will not break the Internet, but may be illegal in your country (oecdinsights.org)

Raindeer writes: The OECD, an organisation working on better policies for better lives in 34 countries, released a new report last week showing that combining the Internet and television will not break the Internet. Most networks will be able to handle it. Some networks, such as Swisscom, are even encouraging Over-The-Top television. Other networks however are considering charging content providers. This reports evaluates those proposals and also shows why content providers do not sign up for many proposals. Furthermore it shows that for-example Cablevision's Cloud DVR would be illegal in France and Australia. (btw I'm the author)
The Internet

Submission + - Internet traffic exchange: 2 billion users and it's done on a handshake (oecdinsights.org)

Raindeer writes: "Every day one Exabyte of data is said to travel over the Internet – enough data to fill 300,000 of the world’s biggest hard disks or 212 million DVDs. And astonishingly, according to Internet Traffic Exchange: Market Developments and Policy Challenges a new OECD report on Internet traffic exchange, most of the thousands of networks that exchange this traffic do so without a written contract or formal agreement.

The report provides evidence that the existing Internet model works extremely well, has boosted growth and competition and brought prices for data down to 100,000 times less than that of a voice minute. A survey of 4300 networks, representing 140,000 direct exchanges of traffic, so called peerings, on the Internet, found that 99.5% of “peering agreements” were on a handshake basis, with no written contract and the exchange of data happening with no money changing hands. Moreover, in many locations, multilateral agreements are in place, using a so-called route server, where hundreds of networks will accept to exchange traffic for free with any network that joins the agreement. The parties to these agreements include not only Internet backbone, access, and content distribution networks, but also universities, NGOs, branches of government, individuals, businesses and enterprises of all sorts – a universality of the constituents of the Internet that extends far beyond the reach of any regulatory body’s influence."

Submission + - How to be the world's greatest ISP (arst.ch) 3

Raindeer writes: We're not always aware of it here in the USA, but there are many ISPs out there in the world who do things quite differently than what we're used to. Some of these ISPs ideas are even really good. Ars surveys the global ISP landscape and paints a picture of what a dream ISP might look like.

So what would it take to craft a truly "cool" ISP, one that attracted legions of adoring customers who sing its praises to everyone they meet? Fortunately, ISPs around the world are doing innovative things at prices that will make your jaw drop. Join us on our worldwide quest to find the coolest ISPs in the world, then get ready to write your own service provider a strongly worded note once you know what else is possible.

Submission + - Nominum calls Open Source DNS 'a recipe for proble

Raindeer writes: "In an effort to promote its new Cloud based DNS service SKYE, Nominum one of the commercial DNS-software, providers slaundered all open source/freeware DNS packages. It said: "Given all the nasty things that have happened this year, freeware is a recipe for problems, and it's just going to get worse.(....) So, whether it's Eircom in Ireland or a Brazilian ISP that was attacked earlier this year, all of them were using some variant of freeware. Freeware is not akin to malware, but is opening up those customers to problems. " This has the DNS community fuming. Especially when you know Nominum was one of the companies affected by the DNS Cache poisoning problem of last year. Something PowerDNS, MaraDNS and DJBDNS all open source weren't vulnerable too."

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