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Submission + - Significant BASH vulnerability found ( 2

SpuriousLogic writes: US-CERT is aware of a Bash vulnerability affecting Unix-based operating systems such as Linux and Mac OS X. Exploitation of this vulnerability may allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on an affected system.

US-CERT recommends users and administrators review the Redhat Security Blog (link is external) for additional details and to refer to their respective Linux or Unix-based OS vendor(s) for an appropriate patch. A GNU Bash patch is also available for experienced users and administrators to implement.
Operating systems with updates include:
Redhat (link is external)

Submission + - A&E Network: Disabling Video On Demand Fast-Forward Is Good

QuietLagoon writes: "A study commissioned by A+E Networks concluded fast-forward disabling did not have any “adverse effects” to the program viewing experience via Video On Demand, nor did it negatively impact intent to continue using VOD."

Apparently, the Video On Demand viewers enjoy watching commercials, and do not mind the removal of the ability to fast forward past those commercials.

Security Fix Leads To PostgreSQL Lock Down 100

hypnosec writes "The developers of the PostgreSQL have announced that they are locking down access to the PostgreSQL repositories to only committers while a fix for a "sufficiently bad" security issue applied. The lock down is temporary and will be lifted once the next release is available. The core committee has announced that they 'apologize in advance for any disruption' adding that 'It seems necessary in this instance, however.'"

Submission + - Chinese firms and the kill switch danger (

An anonymous reader writes: The Natanz case proved that cyber instruments can bridge air gaps to poach data and cause physical harm, and supply chains can easily assist these offenders. It takes rigorous and intense efforts to weed out back doors, kill switches, and insidiously implanted malware. Governments need to establish a flexible, risk-based and transparent standard to check supply chain risks – one that covers the entire lifecycle – from production to resale and system upgrade. After all, even if the United States successfully keeps Huawei and ZTE from entering its borders, current global manufacturing processes and markets make it impossible to shut out all Chinese-made products and components that may flow in. If the Chinese Communist Party, or any other perpetrator, wants to implant a kill switch, they can simply sneak it in.

Submission + - Petition: Workers shouldn't die for the iPhone 5 (

zacharye writes: A new web-based petition singles out Apple and calls for the company to force its suppliers to reform the working conditions at their factories. Original device manufacturer Hon Hai and its subsidiary Foxconn are among the Eastern firms repeatedly accused of mistreating workers, and Apple has again been called upon to demand change as Foxconn’s biggest customer...

Submission + - 92 percent of developers ignoring Vista ( 3

mjasay writes: "And to think Microsoft used to be popular with the developer crowd...Not anymore. A recent report from Evans Data shows fewer than one in 10 software developers writing applications for Windows Vista this year. Eight percent. This is perhaps made even worse by the corresponding data that shows 49 percent of developers writing applications for Windows XP. Such appreciation for history is not likely to warm the cockles of Microsoft's heart, especially when Linux is getting lots of love from developers (13 percent writing apps for it this year and 15.5 percent in 2009). The Mac? Mac OS has rocketed by 380 percent as a targeted development platform. Will Vista's lack of success contribute to a long-term decline in Microsoft-focused development?"

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