Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - Wi-Fi signals allow gesture recognition all through the home (washington.edu)

vinces99 writes: Forget to turn off the lights before leaving the apartment? No problem. Just raise your hand, finger-swipe the air and your lights will power down. Want to change the song playing on your music system in the other room? Move your hand to the right and flip through the songs. University of Washington computer scientists have developed gesture-recognition technology that brings this a step closer to reality. They have shown it’s possible to leverage Wi-Fi signals around us to detect specific movements without needing sensors on the human body or cameras. By using an adapted Wi-Fi router and a few wireless devices in the living room, users could control their electronics and household appliances from any room in the home with a simple gesture.
Youtube

Submission + - UMG uses DMCA to get Bad Lip Reading parody taken 3

Joren writes: "Bad Lip Reading is an independent producer known for anonymously parodying music and political videos by redubbing them with his humorous attempts at lip-reading, such as Everybody Poops (Black Eyed Peas) and Trick the Bridesmaid (Obama). According to an interview in Rolling Stone , he creates entirely new music from scratch consisting of his bad lip readings, and then sets them to the original video, often altering the video for humorous effect and always posting a link to the original off which it is based. Although his efforts have won the respect of parody targets Michael Bublé and Michelle Bachman, not everyone has been pleased. Two days ago, UMG succeeded in getting his parody Dirty Spaceman taken down from YouTube, and despite BLR's efforts to appeal, in his words UMG essentially said "We don't care if you think it's fair use, we want it down." And YouTube killed it.So does this meet the definition of parody as a form of fair use? And if so, what recourse if any is available for artists who are caught in this situation? Are UMG's actions a justifiable attempt to defend their rights under the law, or should this be seen as an attempt to get content they don't like removed from the Internet?"
Movies

Submission + - Starz To Pull Content From Netflix (tekgoblin.com)

tekgoblin writes: "Starz plans to pull all of its movies and TV shows from the Netflix streaming library after talks failed. Starz which is owned by John Malone’s Liberty Media said that they have ended talks with Netflix to renew a deal that ends February 28th. Netflix stands to lose a large amount of content as Starz has licenses for first run Sony and Walt Disney movies."
Japan

Submission + - Satellite Sees Atmospheric Warming Before Quake (technologyreview.com)

cybrpnk2 writes: From Tech Review's arXiv Blog: "Dimitar Ouzounov at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre in Maryland and a few buddies present the data from the Great Tohoku earthquake which devastated Japan on 11 March. Their results, although preliminary, are eye-opening. They say that before the M9 earthquake, the total electron content of the ionosphere increased dramatically over the epicentre, reaching a maximum three days before the quake struck. At the same time, satellite observations showed a big increase in infrared emissions from above the epicentre, which peaked in the hours before the quake. In other words, the atmosphere was heating up."
DRM

Submission + - Wanted: 15 Billion CDs (wistechnology.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Murfie.com is one of the coolest ways I have seen to sell, buy and trade music online. I am sure that, like me, you have a box full of CDs sitting in your closet that you haven't touched in years. Murfie will pay for you to send them in (they even provide a box) and then give you the ability to trade and sell your music online. The site seems very well done and dead simple to use. Already bought a few albums and traded some away. The best part is that you can download the music later. Thank god. Never have to see those CDs again, but still get to enjoy the music. They even let you download in FLAC for you audiophiles out there.
Image

Experiment Shows Not Washing Jeans for 15 Months is Disgusting But Safe Screenshot-sm 258

dbune writes "Young people who argue with their parents over wearing the same pair of smelly jeans can now cite the work of a 20-year old University of Alberta student who wore the same jeans for 15 months straight. From the article: 'Josh Le wore the same pair of jeans to break in the raw denim, so it would wrap the contours of his body, leaving distinct wear lines. He had his textile professor test the jeans for bacteria before washing them for the first time. The results showed high counts of five different kinds of bacteria, but nothing in the range of being considered a health hazard."
Firefox

Nevercookie Eats Evercookies 91

wiredmikey writes "Anonymizer, Inc. has developed Anonymizer Nevercookie, a free Firefox plugin that protects against the Evercookie, a javascript API built and made available by Samy Kamkar (same guy who brought you the Samy Worm and XSS Hacking to Determine Physical Location) who set out to prove that the more you store and the more places you store it, the harder it is for users to control a Web site's ability to uniquely identify their computer. The plugin extends Firefox's private browsing mode by preventing Evercookies from identifying and tracking users."
Privacy

Introducing the Invulnerable Evercookie 332

An anonymous reader writes "Using eight different techniques and locations, a 'security' guy has developed a cookie that is very, very hard to delete. If just one copy of the cookie remains, the other locations are rebuilt. My favorite storage location is in 'RGB values of auto-generated, force-cached PNGs using HTML5 Canvas tag to read pixels (cookies) back out' — awesome."
Image

Researchers Discover Irresistible Dance Moves Screenshot-sm 215

sciencehabit writes "To find out if certain dance moves are more attractive to women than others, researchers recruited a bunch of college guys and used motion-capture to create avatars of them dancing. When women watched the avatars (2 videos included in story), the men they found most attractive were those who kept their heads and torsos moving without flailing their arms and legs. The researchers say dancing is thus an honest signal to women of the man's strength and health, just as it is in crabs and hummingbirds, who also move in special ways to attract mates."
Science

Submission + - Light Stopped by Cold (harvard.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: Harvard professor who once slowed light to a mere 38mph has officially managed to stop light in its tracks. By "passing a beam of light through a small cloud of atoms cooled to temperatures a billion times colder than those in the spaces between stars," Lene Hau has officially put disco out of business.
Transportation

Tesla IPO Raises $226 Million 274

An anonymous reader writes "Tesla, which will trade under TSLA on Nasdaq, has been priced at $17 per share, allowing the electric car start-up to raise more than $226 million in its IPO. Investors were expecting the share price target range to be between $14 and $16 but the overflow of excitement saw Tesla increase the number of shares it plans to offer to 13.3 million, nearly 20 percent more than originally planned." Reader hlovy contributes a link from Xconomy.com summarizing the skepticism among some analysts as to how much staying power TSLA will demonstrate.
Transportation

Inventor Demonstrates Infinitely Variable Transmission 609

ElectricSteve writes with this excerpt from Gizmag: "Ready for a bit of a mental mechanical challenge? Try your hand at understanding how the D-Drive works. Steve Durnin's ingenious new gearbox design is infinitely variable — that is, with your motor running at a constant speed, the D-Drive transmission can smoothly transition from top gear all the way through neutral and into reverse. It doesn't need a clutch, it doesn't use any friction drive components, and the power is always transmitted through strong, reliable gear teeth. In fact, it's a potential revolution in transmission technology."
Google

Google Releases a Web-App Case Study For Hackers 95

Hugh Pickens writes "The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Google has released Jarlsberg, a 'small, cheesy' web application specifically designed to be full of bugs and security flaws as a security tutorial for coders, and encourages programmers to try their hands at exploiting weaknesses in Jarlsberg as a way of teaching them how to avoid similar vulnerabilities in their own code. Jarlsberg has multiple security bugs ranging from cross-site scripting and cross-site request forgery, to information disclosure, denial of service, and remote code execution. The codelab is organized by types of vulnerabilities." (Read on for more.)

Submission + - XKCD Color Survey Has Interesting Results (xkcd.com)

dragoncortez writes: Randall Munroe has posted the results of his color survey and his analysis is both thorough and surprising. It turns out that men and women name colors pretty much the same as a general rule, although women prefer flower-sounding color names, while men prefer such manly sounding color names as "penis" and "dunno." It also turns out that "nobody can spell 'fuchsia'”.

Slashdot Top Deals

"Say yur prayers, yuh flea-pickin' varmint!" -- Yosemite Sam

Working...