Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Trust the World's Fastest VPN with Your Internet Security & Freedom - A Lifetime Subscription of PureVPN at 88% off. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Submission + - FBI Has a National Watchlist That Gives Companies Real Time Updates on Employees (theintercept.com)

schwit1 writes: Rap Back has been advertised by the FBI as an effort to target individuals in "positions of trust," such as those who work with children, the elderly, and the disabled. According to a Rap Back spokesperson, however, there are no formal limits as to "which populations of individuals can be enrolled in the Rap Back Service." Civil liberties advocates fear that under Trump's administration the program will grow with serious consequences for employee privacy, accuracy of records, and fair employment practices.

Rap Back has been advertised by the FBI as an effort to target individuals in "positions of trust," such as those who work with children, the elderly, and the disabled. According to a Rap Back spokesperson, however, there are no formal limits as to "which populations of individuals can be enrolled in the Rap Back Service." Civil liberties advocates fear that the program will grow with serious consequences for employee privacy, accuracy of records, and fair employment practices.

Submission + - SPAM: Social Media And The 2017 Elections

Presto Vivace writes: DownWithTyranny

Create news alerts on the names of every local politician you wish to track, and then share those links on social media whenever you think appropriate. If you are on your neighborhood or civic association's email list, that is a good place to share news articles. You could share press releases of your favorite politician on such lists, but I would advise caution in that regard. The same people who might be interested in a news article might not be receptive to a politician's press release. ... Don't worry if your link doesn't receive any clicks or shares. The power of precinct work is in its cumulative effect. It is sufficient to make your point, it is not necessary to “win the internet.” What you are attempting here is to draw the connection between your elected official's actions and what is happening in your community.

Submission + - Signal, spies and the cult of crypto

Presto Vivace writes: Surveillance Valley

Signal (like Tor and other related "grassroots" crypto Internet Freedom projects) are creations of America's spooky military-corporate machine. They are regime change weapons, designed to project American imperial power in the age of the Internet. Signal might work if you're chatting with your local neighborhood dealer to score a few grams of coke, but don’t expect it to protect you if you decide to do anything really transgressive — like organizing against concentrated corporate political power in the United States. ... And that's what makes Signal's successful marketing to activists in America so disturbing.

Submission + - How to Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping

Presto Vivace writes: Timothy Fadek for WIRED

Your smartphone can reveal essentially your entire digital life, so part of protecting your privacy while protesting is making sure that data doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. Should an altercation with police take place, they could seize your phone and may have cause to search it. Leaving it at home and packing only a standalone camera, or bringing a burner phone, are two ways to ensure that the device you have on you isn’t tied to your online identity. ... ... If you do bring your everyday device, encrypting it with a passcode, using the camera while the phone is still locked, and using end-to-end encrypted messaging services are all ways to protect yourself from proactive government surveillance at marches and rallies. And make sure you have a backup of the data on the device. That way if you want to ditch it, you won’t lose everything.

Submission + - Cybercrooks can crack Android devices' unlock pattern in seconds (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: The pattern lock system used by millions of Android users to secure their phones can be cracked in just five attempts simply by observing hand movements, security experts have claimed.

A study by universities in the UK and China revealed found that the system can be compromised by covertly filming someone unlocking their phone from and feeding this into a computer vision program capable of matching finger movement with the position of the device.

During tests involving 120 participants, the software was able to guess 95% of patterns within five attempts even when the device's screen wasn't visible. Interestingly, the researchers found that more complex patterns were easier to crack than simpler ones.

Submission + - Trump's Treasury pick appears to be part of a federal investigation (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: Trump's transition strategy of picking some of the shadiest people on earth is still going strong. The latest: According to the FBI, his Treasury pick Steven Mnuchin is involved with an "ongoing investigation", as reported by Mike Best over at the FOIA site MuckRock. Best requested Mnuchin's FBI files, but the request was rejected under the grounds of an open investigation, likely related to Mnuchin's superbly-timed exit from Relativity Media — right before it cratered.

Submission + - Vapour Voting in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

Presto Vivace writes: Jill Stein has done the nation a tremendous public service

Pennsylvania has the worst voting system of all. The vast majority of voters use machines with no paper ballot to verify the vote. According to leading computer scientists, these direct recording electronic machines, or DREs, are unreliable, antiquated and easy to hack. ... ... The machines claim, for example, that more than 4,000 voters in Montgomery County , Pa., took the trouble to go to the polls, then supposedly voted for no one in any election. In reality, when these voters in Montgomery selected candidates on the machine, a “no vote” box popped up, meaning thousands of votes were lost inside those machines.

Submission + - Parents sue Apple for toddler's death after a traffic accident. (fox5sandiego.com)

sabri writes: A Texas couple is going after the money by suing Apple for the tragic death of their daughter. How Apple contributed to the girl's death?

Garrett Wilhelm, 22, was able to use FaceTime while driving 65mph on Interstate I-35 near Dallas on Christmas Eve in 2014, when he slammed into the back of someone else's vehicle.

Wait while I sue McDonalds for being fat.

Submission + - Smart Electricity Meters Can Be Dangerously Insecure, Warns Expert (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Smart electricity meters, of which there are more than 100 million installed around the world, are frequently “dangerously insecure," a security expert has said. The lack of security in the smart utilities raises the prospect of a single line of malicious code cutting power to a home or even causing a catastrophic overload leading to exploding meters or house fires, according to Netanel Rubin, co-founder of the security firm Vaultra. If a hacker took control of a smart meter they would be able to know “exactly when and how much electricity you’re using”, Rubin told the 33rd Chaos Communications Congress in Hamburg. An attacker could also see whether a home had any expensive electronics. “He can do billing fraud, setting your bill to whatever he likes [...] The scary thing is if you think about the power they have over your electricity. He will have power over all of your smart devices connected to the electricity. This will have more severe consequences: imagine you woke up to find you’d been robbed by a burglar who didn’t have to break in. “But even if you don’t have smart devices, you are still at risk. An attacker who controls the meter also controls the meter’s software, allowing him to cause it to literally explode.” The problems at the heart of the insecurity stem from outdated protocols, half-hearted implementations and weak design principles. To communicate with the utility company, most smart meters use GSM, the 2G mobile standard. That has a fairly well-known weakness whereby an attacker with a fake mobile tower can cause devices to “hand over” to the fake version from the real tower, simply by providing a strong signal. In GSM, devices have to authenticate with towers, but not the other way round, allowing the fake mast to send its own commands to the meter. Worse still, said Rubin, all the meters from one utility used the same hardcoded credentials. “If an attacker gains access to one meter, it gains access to them all. It is the one key to rule them all.”

Slashdot Top Deals

In a consumer society there are inevitably two kinds of slaves: the prisoners of addiction and the prisoners of envy.

Working...