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Submission + - "Dilbert" creator, Scott Adams, endorses Gary Johnson for President (dilbert.com) 1

SonicSpike writes: Scott Adams, creator of the popular comic, Dilbert, has decided to endorse Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson for President.

He writes at his blog:

"I don’t know how to write this post without unintentionally disrespecting the real victims of abuse in any form. I apologize in advance if it comes off that way. But it’s part of the national conversation now, and unavoidable. The best I can do is focus on how voters perceive the situation. I don’t have an opinion about who did what to whom because I wasn’t in the room any of those times. That said

We fine citizens of the United States find ourselves playing some sort of sex abuse poker in which we have to assign value to various alleged sex crimes to see which alleged rapist/groper/enabler combination we want to inhabit the White House and represent our national brand. Let’s call that situation “not ideal.”

My view is that if either Clinton or Trump can be judged by the weight of the allegations against them, both are 100% unfit for the office. I think Trump supporters think it’s worth the hit to our national brand just to get some specific improvements in the country.

Clinton supporters have been telling me for a few days that any visible support for Trump makes you a supporter of sex abuse. From a persuasion standpoint, that actually makes sense. If people see it that way, that’s the reality you have to deal with. I choose to not be part of that reality so I moved my endorsement to Gary Johnson.

I encourage all Clinton supporters to do the same, and for the same reason. I don’t know if any of the allegations against the Clinton’s are true, but since we are judging each other on associations, you don’t want to be seen as supporting sex abuse by putting an alleged duo of abusers (the perp and the clean-up crew) into office. I think you will agree that it doesn’t matter if any of the allegations are true, because the stink from a mountain of allegations – many that seem credible to observers – is bad for the national brand too. To even consider putting the Clinton’s back in the White House is an insult to women and every survivor of abuse.

To be fair, Gary Johnson is a pot head who didn’t know what Allepo was. I call that relatable. A President Johnson administration might bring with it some operational risks, and policy risks, but at least he won’t slime you by association and turn you into some sort of cheerleader for sex abuse in the way you would if you voted for the Clintons or Trump.

If you take allegations of sex abuse seriously – and you should – vote Johnson. To vote for Clinton or Trump is to be seen by others as an enabler for sexual abuse. I don’t think that’s what anyone had in mind by breaking the glass ceiling. Don’t let it happen to you."

Submission + - Lewd Donald Trump Caught On Tape (washingtonpost.com) 2

dark.nebulae writes: US Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump was recorded in 2005 speaking in vulgar terms towards women. The recording is causing turmoil within the Republican party and the Trump Pence campaign.

Submission + - SPAM: Prosecutorial Misconduct is Now a Felony in California 1

schwit1 writes: Along with signing a major asset forfeiture reform bill last week, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law making it a felony for prosecutors to intentionally withhold evidence.

Under the new law, prosecutors who alter or intentionally withhold evidence from defense counsels can face up to three years in prison. Previously, prosecutorial misconduct in California was only a misdemeanor. Courts were statutorily required to report misconduct to the state bar association, but advocates of the bill say the laws were rarely enforced.

"When a prosecutor intentionally withholds exculpatory evidence, an unknowing and innocent defendant can be convicted, sentenced, and incarcerated for a long time," California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, a group of criminal defense lawyers that supported the bill, told The Los Angeles Times. "These bad-acting prosecutors rarely, if ever, face any actually consequences for their actions."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Federal Prosecutors actually prosecuting H1-B Fraud (ap.org)

McGruber writes: The Associated Press is reporting (http://bigstory.ap.org/article/8fb0819e3b6543788237f32070f73974/business-owner-2-firms-face-visa-fraud-charges) that Federal Prosecutors have filed conspiracy charges against a part-owner of two information technology firms and an employee for fraudulently using the H-1B program.

Prosecutors said the conspirators falsely represented that the foreign workers had full-time positions and were paid an annual salary. They said the workers were only paid when placed at a third-party client and the defendants sometimes generated false payroll records. The defendants are charged with conspiracy to commit visa fraud and obstruct justice and conspiracy to harbor aliens. They face up to 15 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

Submission + - Oldest-ever proteins extracted from 3.8-million-year-old ostrich shells (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Scientists have smashed through another time barrier in their search for ancient proteins from fossilized teeth and bones, adding to growing excitement about the promise of using proteins to study extinct animals and humans that lived more than 1 million years ago. Until now, the oldest sequenced proteins are largely acknowledged to come from a 700,000-year-old horse in Canada’s Yukon territory, despite claims of extraction from much older dinosaurs. Now geneticists report that they have extracted proteins from 3.8-million-year-old ostrich egg shells in Laetoli, Tanzania, and from the 1.7-million-year-old tooth enamel of several extinct animals in Dmanisi, Georgia. The teeth, buried at the fossil site that houses the earliest hominin remains outside Africa, came from extinct horses, rhinos, and deer. One team has also extracted proteins from 3.8-million-year-old ostrich eggshells from the site of some of the world’s earliest human footprints.

Submission + - Norwegian Oil Fund Asked to Consdier if Facebook is Unetical 2

polemistes writes: During the last few weeks there has been an uproar (this is in English) in Norwegian media about Facebook censorship. It started with writer Tom Egeland posting the iconic 1972 photo of Kim Phuc, running from a napalm bomb. Facebook decided that the nudity in the photo could be offensive, so they deleted it. When Egeland posted to criticise the censorship, the whole post was deleted. A major internet news site wrote about it, and the editor shared his article on Facebook, and was blocked for 24 hours. Now the Norwegian Press Association has asked the ethics committee of the Norwegain Oil Fund, who has invested about $1.6 billion in Facebook, to consider whether Facebook is acting unethically. If they are found to do so, the fund will have to withdraw their investments, because its strict ethical code. As a side-note:The google-translated article also censors the photo.

Comment Actually Powered by the Ejecta... (Score 1) 248

... of the trillions of endless assertions on the internet which neither create any nor meet any equal and opposite force, since they have no causal effect on reality. To resolve this discrepancy of pent-up psychodimensional energy, the universe has willed into existence such a drive tapping into a transdimensional energy portal releasing the pent-up energy of those assertions, thereby preventing a massive buildup which would eventually cause such a huge catastrophic explosion so as to render reality as we know it utterly destroyed.

Ah, the Universe.

Submission + - Hiding Commands in AAAA DNS Records for Covert Command and Control Channels (sans.edu)

UnderAttack writes: DNS makes for a great command and control channel. Pretty much all systems are able to reach the global DNS infrastructure via recursive name servers. The other advantage of DNS is that any operating system includes tools to perform DNS lookups on the command line. To exfiltrate data, a simple "A" record lookup for a hostname can be used like 4111111111111111.evilexample.com to exfiltrate a credit card number. But to send commands back to the system, many covert channels use "TXT" records, which are much less common and easily detected or blocked.

The script prevented here uses a simple bash script to instead encode commands in AAAA records, and use them to send command back to the compromised systems. AAAA records hold 16 bytes per record, and due to them being displayed in hex, are easily decoded with tools like xxd.

Submission + - Bitcoin Not Money, Rules Miami Judge In Dismissing Laundering Charges (miamiherald.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Bitcoin does not actually qualify as money, a Miami-Dade judge ruled Monday in throwing out criminal charges against a Miami Beach man charged with illegally selling the virtual currency. The defendant, Michell Espinoza, was charged with illegally selling and laundering $1,500 worth of Bitcoins to undercover detectives who told him they wanted to use the money to buy stolen credit-card numbers. But Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Teresa Mary Pooler ruled that Bitcoin was not backed by any government or bank, and was not “tangible wealth” and “cannot be hidden under a mattress like cash and gold bars.” “The court is not an expert in economics, however, it is very clear, even to someone with limited knowledge in the area, the Bitcoin has a long way to go before it the equivalent of money,” Pooler wrote in an eight-page order. The judge also wrote that Florida law – which says someone can be charged with money laundering if they engage in a financial transaction that will “promote” illegal activity – is way too vague to apply to Bitcoin. “This court is unwilling to punish a man for selling his property to another, when his actions fall under a statute that is so vaguely written that even legal professionals have difficulty finding a singular meaning,” she wrote.

Submission + - SPAM: Use Hypnotism to Make Your Kids Behave?

kheldan writes: Apparently someone thinks hypnotizing kids to make them do their homework, chores, and otherwise 'behave' is a good idea. Lisa Machenberg, a professional hypnotist, has been using this on over 1000 kids in the last 23 years. “I hypnotize my children and my husband to do things for my benefit all the time,” she says.

But hypnosis can have serious side effects, including tiredness, crisis of identity, insomnia, irritability, fears, panic attacks, deficit of attention, distorted sense of self, confusion, sexually abberant behaviors, unexpected trance-like state, delusional thinking, depression, dizziness, syncope, fearfulness, feelings of guilt, histrionic reactions, impaired memory, nausea, obsessions, changes in personality.

Panacea, or child abuse? You be the judge.

Submission + - Pending bill would kill a big H-1B loophole (computerworld.com)

ErichTheRed writes: This isn't perfect, but it is the first attempt I've seen at removing the "body shop" loophole in the H-1B visa system. A bill has been introduced in Congress that would raise the minimum wage for an H-1B holder from $60K to $100K, and place limits on the body shop companies that employ mostly H-1B holders in a pass-through arrangement. Whether it's enough to stop the direct replacement of workers, or whether it will just accelerate offshoring, remains to be seen. But, I think removing the most blatant and most abused loopholes in the rules is a good start.

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