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Emscripten and New Javascript Engine Bring Unreal Engine To Firefox 124

MojoKid writes "There's no doubt that gaming on the Web has improved dramatically in recent years, but Mozilla believes it has developed new technology that will deliver a big leap in what browser-based gaming can become. The company developed a highly-optimized version of Javascript that's designed to 'supercharge' a game's code to deliver near-native performance. And now that innovation has enabled Mozilla to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the browser. As a sort of proof of concept, Mozilla debuted this BananaBread game demo that was built using WebGL, Emscripten, and the new JavaScript version called 'asm.js.' Mozilla says that it's working with the likes of EA, Disney, and ZeptoLab to optimize games for the mobile Web, as well." Emscripten was previously used to port Doom to the browser.

Submission + - Unity 3D Game Engine Adds Linux Support (

dartttt writes: After more than 14,000 votes by Linux users and efforts by Brian Fargo, Unity 3D has added Linux support to their popular game engine. Starting with Unity 4.0, Linux will be supported as a publishing platform allowing Unity games to be played natively on Linux. Only standalone desktop games will be supported initially. There is no word on Linux support for game editor and web player.

Submission + - Microsoft Relents On Metro-Only VS Express (

snydeq writes: "After hearing objections from developers, Microsoft will offer a version of its Visual Studio Express 2012 package for desktop application development after all. The company had previously announced that Express 2012 editions, which are free, platform-specific versions of the Visual Studio 2012 IDE, would be limited to Windows 8 Metro-style development as well as development for the Windows Azure cloud platform, Windows Phone, and Web applications. 'We heard from our community that developers want to have for Windows desktop development the same great experience and access to the latest Visual Studio 2012 features at the Express level. ... And it will enable developers working on open source applications to target existing and previous versions of Windows.'"

Submission + - Flame uses a yet unknown MD5 chosen-prefix collision attack (

SpanglerIsAGod writes: We have confirmed that Flame uses a yet unknown MD5 chosen-prefix collision attack," Marc Stevens and B.M.M. de Weger wrote in an e-mail posted to a cryptography discussion group earlier this week. "The collision attack itself is very interesting from a scientific viewpoint, and there are already some practical implications.

Submission + - NPR's "Car Talk" Closing (

stevegee58 writes: After 25 years on the air, Tom and Ray Magliozzi (aka Click and Clack, The Tappet Brothers) are calling it quits in September.
With their nerdy humor, explosive laughter and geek cred (both MIT alums) Tom and Ray will be sorely missed by the average NPR-listening Slashdotter.


Submission + - MIT creates self-assembling 3D nanostructures, could be the future of chips (

MrSeb writes: "MIT has devised a way of creating complex, self-assembling 3D nanostructures of wires and junctions. While self-assembling structures have been made from polymers before, this is the first time that multi-layer, configurable layouts have been created, opening up the path to self-assembled computer chips. Basically, MIT uses diblock copolymers, which are large molecules formed from two distinct polymers (each with different chemical and physical properties). These copolymers naturally form long cylinders — wires. The key to MIT’s discovery is that the scientists have worked out how to exactly control the arrangement of these block copolymers. By growing tiny, 10nm-wide silica “posts” on a silicon substrate, the researchers can control the angles, bends, spacing, and junctions of the copolymer wires. Once the grid of posts has been built, the wafer is simply covered in the polymer material, and chip’s wires and junctions self-assemble. The reason everyone is so excited, though, is that the silica posts can be built using equipment that is compatible with existing semiconductor fabs. Theoretically, chips built using this technique could have a much smaller feature size than the 28nm and 22nm chips produced by TSMC and Intel. According to Caroline Ross of MIT, it should be possible to build posts that are much smaller than 10nm."

Submission + - LinkedIn Password Hashes Leaked Online

jones_supa writes: A user in a Russian forum (which?) is claiming to have hacked LinkedIn to the tune of almost 6.5 million account details. The user uploaded 6,458,020 SHA-1 hashed passwords, but no usernames. Several people have said on Twitter that they found their real LinkedIn passwords as hashes on the list. The Verge spoke with Mikko Hyppönen, Chief Research Officer at F-Secure, who thinks this is a real collection. He told us he is 'guessing it's some sort of exploit on their web interface, but there's no way to know.' We will have to wait for LinkedIn to report back to be sure what exactly has happened.
The Internet

Submission + - Reddit Founder Leads Charge for a "Bat Signal for the Internet" (

TheGift73 writes: "Beyond the Blackout

The Internet Defense League takes the tactic that killed SOPA & PIPA and turns it into a permanent force for defending the internet, and making it better. Think of it like the internet's Emergency Broadcast System, or its bat signal!

The Plan

When the internet's in danger and we need millions of people to act, the League will ask its members to broadcast an action. (Say, a prominent message asking everyone to call their elected leaders.) With the combined reach of our websites and social networks, we can be massively more effective than any one organization."


Submission + - Google Now Searches JavaScript (

mikejuk writes: Google has been improving the way that its Googlebot searches dynamic web pages for some time — but it seems to be causing some added interest just at the moment. In the past Google has encouraged developers to avoid using JavaScript to deliver content or links to content because of the difficulty of indexing dynamic content. Over time, however, the Googlebot has incorporated ways of searching content that is provided via JavaScript.
Now it seems that it has got so good at the task Google is asking us to allow the Googlebot to scan the JavaScript used by our sites.
Working with JavaScript means that the Googlebot has to actually download and run the scripts and this is more complicated than you might think. This has led to speculation of whether or not it might be possible to include JavaScript on a site that could use the Google cloud to compute something. For example, imagine that you set up a JavaScript program to compute the n-digits of Pi, or a BitCoin miner, and had the result formed into a custom URL — which the Googlebot would then try to access as part of its crawl. By looking at, say, the query part of the URL in the log you might be able to get back a useful result.

United States

Submission + - ZTE Confirms Security Hole in U.S. Phone (

fishmike writes: ZTE Corp, the world's No.4 handset vendor and one of two Chinese companies under U.S. scrutiny over security concerns, said one of its mobile phone models sold in the United States contains a vulnerability that researchers say could allow others to control the device.

Submission + - Supervolcano Drilling Plan Gets Go-Ahead (

sciencehabit writes: A project to drill deep into the heart of a “supervolcano” in southern Italy has finally received the green light, despite claims that the drilling would put the population of Naples at risk of small earthquakes or an explosion. Yesterday, Italian news agency ANSA quoted project coordinator Giuseppe De Natale of Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology as saying that the office of Naples mayor Luigi de Magistris has approved the drilling of a pilot hole 500 meters deep.

Submission + - NASA Investigating Possible SSL Compromise (

wiredmikey writes: A NASA spokesperson has told SecurityWeek that they’re investigating claims made by a group of Iranian hackers earlier this week. The claim is that a SSL certificate issued to NASA’s Research and Education Support Services (NRESS) group has been compromised, and used in a Man-in-the-Middle attack.

On Wednesday, an Iranian student group comprised of programmers and hackers, known as the Cyber Warriors Team, claimed to have compromised the SSL cert used on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System (NSPIRES) website.

If the claims are true, this wouldn’t be the first time the space agency has had security issues. In March, NASA Inspector General Paul K. Martin told the House’s Committee on Science, Space, and Technology’s Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, that the agency faces serious challenges when it comes to protecting its information and systems from cyber attacks, and that at one point, attackers had full functional control over NASA networks.


Submission + - White House Threatens To Veto CISPA (

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: Looks like CISPA may be headed the way of SOPA. Despite some proposed amendments to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, the White House issued a statement Wednesday threatening to veto the bill if it's passed by Congress. The president’s advisors now say they fear the bill’s vague language would allow too much of users’ private information to be leaked to the government while still not going far enough to offer real defenses against digital attacks. "Cybersecurity and privacy are not mutually exclusive," the statement says.

Submission + - 7 Programming Myths ( 1

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Neil McAllister offers up seven myths of modern programming practices, noting that while programming tools have gotten sharper, software development remains rife with misconceptions on productivity, code efficiency, offshoring, and more. 'Even among people as logical and rational as software developers, you should never underestimate the power of myth. Some programmers will believe what they choose to believe against all better judgment,' McAllister wrties. 'The real shame is that, in many cases, our elders pointed out our errors years ago, if only we would pay attention. Here are just a few examples of modern-day programming myths, many of which are actually new takes on age-old fallacies.'"

Submission + - Gabriel Knight creator's new game project gains traction! (

joseph_austin writes: This article explains newly divulged information about the new project by Jane Jensen, creator of the Gabriel Knight series. The Kickstarter behind this is well on the way to being funded, but if it doubles its mark then Jane Jensen has promised a second game. (Note: I'm not affiliated with Pinkerton Road, but I am a backer. Hope this peaks some interest if anyone hasn't heard of the project.)

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