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Submission + - More Transistors on Chips than Neurons in our Brains Within 12 Years (ibtimes.co.uk)

DavidGilbert99 writes: Within the next 10-12 years, the chips powering our PCs will have more transistors on them than our brains have neurons — and that's around 100 billion in case you were wondering. However, Intel's Mooly Eden told an audience at CES 2014, than adding more transistors alone won't make computing better, that in order to do that we need to make computing more natural, intuitive and immersive.

Submission + - Bribe Devs To Improve Open Source Software (i-programmer.info) 1

mikejuk writes: Bribe.io announces itself as:
A super easy way to bribe developers to fix bugs and add features in the software you're using.
Recognizing the fact that a lot of open source projects are maintained by developers working alone and in their spare time, the idea is to encourage other developers to by specifying a monetary value to a bug report or feature enhancement. Once an initial "Bribe" has been posted others can "chip in" and add to the financial incentive.
Obviously there are problems to overcome — will it lead to devs introducing bugs at the same time as new features just to get paid to fix them? Also how does this fit with the underlying ethos of open source software? I Can hear RMS already....

Submission + - Vastly improved Raspberry Pi performance with Wayland

nekohayo writes: While Wayland/Weston 1.1 brought support to the Raspberry Pi merely a month ago, work has recently been done to bring true hardware-accelerated compositing capabilities to the RPi's graphics stack using Weston. The Raspberry Pi foundation has made an announcement about the work that has been done with Collabora to make this happen. X.org/Wayland developer Daniel Stone has written a blog post about this, including a video demonstrating the improved reactivity and performance. Developer Pekka Paalanen also provided additional technical details about the implementation.

Submission + - Snags on the Road to WWW History (bbc.co.uk)

Rambo Tribble writes: The BBC is reporting that difficulties are being encountered in Cern's effort to recreate the original World Wide Web. It appears no one kept adequate backups and passwords have been lost, (can you imagine?) The public is being asked to help and one early page from 1991 has been recovered from the Next machine of American Paul Jones. Can you help?

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